Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Is there a better term for 'low-level?'

In computer programming, low-level means something used as a base upon which to build more complex mechanisms. To the untrained ear, I think the term might imply inferiority, which is simply not the ...
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5answers
12k views

Relation between “concept” and “conception”

concept: an abstract idea; a general notion conception: the way in which something is perceived or regarded These two words are troubling me because it seems that there is a way that concept ...
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3answers
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A person you have a relationship for only business

In a piece of software, what would I call a person you have a relationship for only business in real life. He/she is not your friend and you are not working in same place. For instance, you are ...
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9answers
8k views

What is the word for something that is punishable by law, but is not a crime?

What is the legal term in English for something that is punishable by law, but is not a crime (i.e. does not affect your criminal record)? I mean all the lesser (than crime) violations of the law, ...
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2answers
284 views

Omitting the definite article before “problem is”

I've noticed that the definite article is often omitted preceding the word "problem" in newspapers and magazines. Not in speech, but just in print. Here's an example: Many politicians feel that ...
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2answers
261 views

Is “underlying” the right word?

I am describing a mathematical model, where the probability density function of a variable is made up of two contributions, two distributions. Mathematically we would say that f(x) = g1(x) + g2(x). ...
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13answers
80k views

How can I describe someone who feels little or no emotion?

I don't mean someone who lacks emotion because they "don't care", but because either they can't feel emotion or the emotional response is delayed because of a genetic disposition. Maybe there is an ...
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2answers
6k views

When someone says “that explanation was a lot of hand-waving” what does this mean?

I've been hearing term "hand-waving" thrown around a lot, especially when my peers describe their CS(computer science) classes. Does anyone know what that term means in this context? (also a little ...
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2answers
137 views

Term for emergent system with its own logical rules/laws?

Eigenlogik in German means that a subsystem has its own set of rules determining its phenomenological behavior. E.g. in sociology, a social group of humans shows a group behavior based on rules/laws ...
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2answers
306 views

Will my audience understand the phrase “lead time”?

...results in a relatively long lead time for our software products. Should I use this expression in an article for average software developers? (i.e. an international Java magazine) Would it ...
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4answers
1k views

What's the correct grammatical term for clauses expressing the goal or a target of an action expressed in the main clause?

What's the correct grammatical term for clauses expressing the goal or a target of an action expressed in the main clause? For example: Jack gave me his cell phone so that I could call my Mom. Dad ...
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3answers
1k views

What term is most appropriate when describing the infinite space of possibilities created through inductive reasoning?

In arguments contrasting the differences between deductive reasoning and inductive reasoning, it is often pointed out that deductive reasoning is, by definition, bounded by the terms described in the ...
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4answers
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Why does “air conditioning” always mean “cooling” and never “heating”?

For that matter, air conditioning could include humidifying or dehumidifying, but it doesn't: only cooling. Why weren't air conditioners called air coolers?
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1answer
239 views

What is the name for the class of computer programs that act as a front end for a database? [closed]

If you are writing a computer program that manages a large database of clients, like a rolodex, or a program that stores medical records for patients. What is that "class" of program called. The ...
11
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4answers
22k views

What are the treads on the side of the highway called?

On the sides of most highways (in the U.S. at least), there are rough treads just outside the travel lanes to snap a driver to attention if the vehicle is drifting off the road. Is there a name for ...
6
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3answers
639 views

Is there a term for it when you use an obviously false statement to highlight the falsity or absurdity of another?

For example, person A states something. Person B says "And pigs fly" to imply person A was wrong. If there's no term for it, what could you call that that sounds smart?
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1answer
4k views

An alternative to “stakeholder”

Here's a sentence taken from an executive memo, "Action item: get feedback from stakeholders on SuperDongle 9000". Is there something that can replace "stakeholder"? The word is not being used ...
5
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1answer
7k views

“Notepad” vs. “notebook” — what's the difference?

Can you please tell me the difference between a notepad and a notebook (as in paper, not electronic ones)? To me, they are the same but I guess there must be some difference.
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2answers
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Is “Monday” a proper noun or a common noun?

I can understand why Monday is an abstract noun (it isn't something we can perceive with any of our 5 senses), But is Monday considered a proper noun or a common noun?
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2answers
23k views

Distinguish “naming” and “telling” part of simple sentence with compound predicate

Dad caught fish and cooked them for supper. This is a question from a test that my son missed; he is in the second grade. The instructions for the test are as follows: Put one line under the ...
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4answers
26k views

What do you call the “narrator” of lyric poem?

In a narrative poem, the entity telling the story is called the narrator. The narrator is different from the author, in that the author is the real person who wrote the poem, while the narrator is a ...
3
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1answer
181 views

addressee-new vs discourse-new

Regarding terminology used by CEGL as referenced in this question, can anyone explain the difference between addressee-new and discourse-new? My understanding of addressee-new is that this refers to ...
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5answers
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What is the name of this type of word: “Mr.”, “Ms.”, “Dr.”?

What is this type of word called: Mr., Ms., Dr.? In the document I am using, it is referred to as the "prefix", but I don't think that is correct.
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2answers
2k views

How to write “calf's liver” on menu [closed]

Calf's liver as an item on a restaurant menu is certainly correct, but one also sees calves liver written down. What certainly is wrong is calves' liver, except if one assumes that many calves were ...
2
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2answers
279 views

Is there a more-accepted synonym to the term “Commonwealth English”?

I've mainly encountered the term "Commonwealth English" in The Jargon File. However, Wiktionary says the term is fairly rare. Are there more accepted terms? Ones that I'm aware of include: British ...
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4answers
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What do you call a pair of words which would be meaningless without one of them?

I am referring to a set of words that wouldn't make sense if one word or the other was omitted. Like barbershop quartet, or Cyber Security. What do you exactly call this set of words?
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1answer
455 views

How to derive a noun or adective or adverb from “nya”? [closed]

In Russian network jargon there is adjective "няшный" (originating from anime fandom's "nya"). It is somewhat related to "kawaii" (cute) or "nice", but not the same. However in English any attempts ...
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3answers
685 views

generic term for “A-hed”? (quirky article at the bottom of the front page of the Wall Street Journal) [closed]

The Wall Street Journal usually has a quirky article on the bottom of the front page, on anything from paper clips to tugboat racing to borscht manufacturers. Their name for it is an A-hed. Is there a ...
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4answers
9k views

“Let's burn that bridge when we come to it” – is this sort of idiom mixing considered a pun, and if so, does it have a specific name?

I couldn't come up with a short title, but the upside is that there is not much needed to be said in the body of the question! For @dmr (and others), it mixes “let's cross that bridge when we come ...
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2answers
2k views

Why is the current unrest in the Arab world called the “Arab Spring”?

Does spring in "Arab Spring" refer to the season - or something else?
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2answers
704 views

What's the grammatical term for this phenomenon? [closed]

There is obviously a big essential difference between "no towel" and "there isn't a towel". I mean, the former cannot probably serve as a complete sentence, while the latter can. The former can ...
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2answers
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Etymology of “binky” — three questions

Definition 2 of binky at wiktionary is "(rabbit behavior) A high hop that a rabbit may perform when happy." This definition is consistent with that at rabbitspeak, and not inconsistent with "A kind ...
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1answer
128 views

What is the term for an item/entry in a compendium?

A compendium is a concise, yet comprehensive compilation of a body of knowledge. Source: Wikipedia What then would I call an entry or item of knowledge that is contained by a compendium? Is there a ...
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3answers
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Is there a technical term for insideout-ness?

So the technical term for right or left handedness is chirality. The technical term for evenness or oddness is parity. Is there a similar term for inside-out-ness vs right-side-out-ness? EDIT: I ...
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2answers
150 views

What is one “content” item in a Wikipedia called?

I think that my question can best be explained by an example: In the following Wikipedia entry (I hope "entry" is the right term), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Herring, there are multiple "...
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5answers
315 views

What's the term to describe this kind of sentence?

What is the term to describe this kind of sentence: I don't know why people like to study things that they don't like to study. There's some kind of logic error with this statement, and it's ...
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3answers
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“Bring 6 eggs. If there are potatoes, bring 9.”

This is with reference to this comic, called A Programmer's Life (translated from Portuguese): Programmer: My wife asked me to go to the market and said: “Bring six eggs. If there are potatoes, ...
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4answers
3k views

What's the origin of “beta” to describe a “user-testing” phase of computer development?

It occurred to me that I use the term "beta" to describe a "release candidate" of a computer product that has passed all expectations of the development team, and is now being given limited exposure ...
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4answers
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What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?

Is sunlight a concrete or abstract noun? What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
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1answer
24k views

“Production” vs. “manufacturing”

What are the connotations of production and manufacturing? In what situation would you prefer one over the other?
4
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4answers
1k views

“Injunct” vs “Enjoin”

The injunctions (and super-injunctions) that occasionally make the headlines restrain a defendant from doing something. It is fairly clear (e.g. OED) that the word was formed as a noun from enjoin in ...
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4answers
104 views

Error on wiki page - Is it ok?

Taken from Wikipedia on Windows and Linux However such an approach has indeed produced several vulnerabilities, although this is a rare case Is that statement logically correct because it ...
5
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5answers
507 views

Word to describe a mathematical variable that repeats, like an angle or time

In mathematics a variable can be said to be constrained if it must lie within certain bounds, for example: 0 < x < 1 (the variable x is constrained: it lies between zero and one) However ...
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5answers
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What do we call an adjective made of a verb?

What do we call adjectives formed from verbs? For example: Lost is an adjective made from lose, Forgotten is an adjective made from forget, Broken is an adjective made from break. What is the ...
5
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2answers
12k views

Term for "married bridesmaid”

It was my understanding that, in traditional Western weddings, if the bride were to become unavailable on the day of her wedding then the groom was expected to wed the maid of honor or the next ...
6
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2answers
9k views

Why do people use “mayday” and not “help”? [closed]

I’m not native English speaker, so I wonder why forces like policemen and firemen and such use Mayday instead of the simpler Help. What is origin of this habit?
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2answers
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What's the rule for writing sentences with parallel clauses?

I've sometimes seen very nicely written sentences that have 2 clauses: the first is a full sentence, while the second, which is supposed to have a similar structure, was shorten into a special ...
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9answers
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Is the term 'String' too jargony to use in a user interface?

Having worked as a software developer for a long time, I'm out of touch sometimes with whether a word would be considered jargon. I am adding something to a user interface where a name is given, and ...
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6answers
1k views

What is the technical name for quotes?

This should be an easy question to answer. In my program, I am building a structure which will hold the symbol which identifies a string literal. I want to give the element a meaningful name that ...
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2answers
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Is there a word or term other than ‘exemplar’ for the educational cards used to teach English?

Is there a word or term other than ‘exemplar’ for the educational cards used in primary classrooms to teach English? These are the: 'A' is for 'Apple' Or for the cards which show how to write a ...