Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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what does “showing the fly the way out of the fly-bottle” literally means?

I saw this expression: "the aim of the activity is "to show the fly the way out of the fly-bottle". " (It is connected with this other expression: "I don't know my way about".) I grasped the ...
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1answer
193 views

What does “go on floors” really mean?

When reading movie magazines or news I come across lines like the below: Mr. A's new film goes on floors next month. The actors 2 movies are going on floors later this year. One can ...
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6answers
4k views

Is there a pre-Internet term for “gamification”?

Gamification is a relatively new term which was coined and has been made highly popular in the Internet era. From the related Wikipedia article: Though the term "gamification" was coined in 2002 ...
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Is there a proper name for an exchange trophy?

Institutions often hand out awards that include trophies that are either to be returned after the ceremony, or after one year when a new candidate is awarded the same trophy and their name is engraved ...
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1answer
54 views

Need a word for someone not acknowledging what you are saying, and who attempts to put you in a bad light [closed]

Word for: when a person you are dealing with does not acknowledge what you are saying but rather, goes on the attack and attempts to present you in a bad light, such as diversionary tactics
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1answer
77 views

Word or phrase to describe increasing periods between attempting the same operation

I'm looking for a term (single word or phrase) that describes the trick in software development to (typically exponentially) increase time between successive attempts to do an action on a server, for ...
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1answer
94 views

Is it now standard to refer to February 29th as a “bissextile day”?

I've noticed the obscure word "bissextile" showing up with greater frequency, especially in the past few leap years. In the past, the word would occasionally show up to refer to leap years as ...
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2answers
78 views

Meaningless/Placeholder Verb?

In some fields of study, there are various placeholder nouns/proper nouns---basically nouns that are conventionally used in an example but are understood not to correspond to an actual object. In ...
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1answer
36 views

How to explain the action of putting a table calendar facedown from an upright position?

I am unable to come up with the words to explain this action. To turn it the other away would still mean it is in an upright position. Put it down does not sound right either. Please help.
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6answers
269 views

In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun?

I thought I'd post this as it illustrates a problem often encountered on ELU. In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun? I've seen ...
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1answer
49 views

Name for person who uses epanorthosis

How would you from the noun epanorthosis derive a name describing a person who frequently uses this rhetorical tactic? An epanorthocian? Eparnorcian? Epanorthologist? Epanorthic? Something else? The ...
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2answers
160 views

Is “each and everyone” redundant? [closed]

Is saying "each and everyone" redundant? Also, what is the difference between "each and everyone" and "each and every one"? Thanks
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13answers
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Is there a term for “likes” and “dislikes” on a social network?

What is the term to use for "likes" and "dislikes" on social networks? Are they marks or grades or rates or anything else? My purpose is that I'm programming a system where I have a Post domain ...
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1answer
59 views

Term for appending “-esque” or “-ish” to a a word to form an adjective

What is the name of the term for when someone transforms a noun into an adjective by appending -esque or -ish to the end of the noun? I see this in cases where an appropriate adjective doesn't readily ...
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2answers
151 views

Is it correct to use “git” as verb?

I know that the word git is used for describing an unpleasant person. Also Git is a name of a version control system which is quite popular among software developers. I thought this word did not ...
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14answers
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What is the correct term for 'misleading' investigations?

I am looking for the more common and correct term used when someone tries to misdirect investigations on a crime that has been committed . For example, a murderer who tries to create false ...
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0answers
46 views

“lmfaoooooooo”, “nooooooo” and other elongated words [closed]

Is there are phrase for elongating a word based off a less formal way of speaking (or would speak for colloquialisms like lmfao)? examples: noooooooo -> no yeaaaaaahhhh -> yeah loooooool ...
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1answer
79 views

Those damned “Screws” in the “Das Boot” [closed]

In the emergency dive scene one seaman is carrying a box with eggs which also has the convenient inscription "Vorsicht Eier!" (Careful, eggs !). On 0:14/0:15 he says on German: "Wahrschau ! Eier !" ...
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1answer
35 views

Employee “Registration Number” [closed]

I need to know what is the proper way to name the registration number of an employee within a company or firm to uniquely identify her/him. In my country (Italy) we we make large use of it. Thanks. ...
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1answer
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“Real estate” or “property” in my particular case?

I am launching a service for adding and viewing classifieds of houses, land (plot) and commercial real estate. Must it be described as "Real Estate Listings Platform" or "Property Listings Platform"? ...
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3answers
938 views

Why do Americans still call Native Americans “Indians”? [closed]

Why do some Americans still call the indigenous people of the Americas "Indians" when they now know that they're not from India?
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1answer
54 views

Term to describe such conversational phrases [closed]

Is there a term to describe colloquial, chatty phrases such as: Weird, I know. Who knew there was a place called Pikachu. You may be wondering... I'm doing a written assignment and I have to ...
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3answers
77 views

Argumentation fallacies: Impossible to prove the non-existing [closed]

"It is impossible to prove that something does not exist, it is only possible to prove that sth does exist." - Is there an english term or does there exist a known argumentation fallacy to describe ...
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2answers
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What would be a good antonym for the term “reflective equilibrium”?

The term reflective equilibrium refers to, very simply put, when there's a balance between one's intuition and one's theories about the world. Personally, I tend to strive for the opposite, an ...
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2answers
156 views

What did English use before “triangle”?

Apparently the word "triangle" was borrowed into English in the late 1300s. Triangles are a very common shape in everyday life, and there were certainly English-speaking craftsmen and artists before ...
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3answers
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Is there a word that means “to rotate into the correct position”?

Say you have a rocket in the incorrect orientation, and it moves into the correct orientation, what is a word instead of moves that describes what the rocket did?
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2answers
115 views

Is there a term for the use of adjectives as nouns?

I wonder when this horrible trend started—to me it seems to have proliferated very recently, over the last year or two: Give the gift of happy this Christmas ..or how about this, from the ...
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5answers
701 views

Is there a word for “a person from another race”?

I am searching for a word that means ‘of another race’ to be used in context of a sentence such as "She was deeply protective to her [of other race] foster children." "They shunned the ...
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1answer
149 views

What do you call a murderer who burns their victims alive?

I promise this isn't as weird as it sounds. I've tried a bit of Googling but I can't find anything that works well. I'm looking for a single word for a pyromaniac that burns people alive. The ...
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2answers
72 views

Is there a term for someone who barely moves their arms whilst walking?

I know someone who barely moves his arms when he walks, a bit like Frankenstein's monster. There is a Seinfeld episode ("The Summer of George") in which someone with the same behaviour is made fun of ...
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5answers
275 views

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...
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1answer
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Best or technical term for the act of including a *purposeful gaff* in writing?

Although I suspect there are applicable examples in literature and newsprint, the specific context here is the online practice of either including a dud, or excluding an obvious/needed example in a ...
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In Baseball, is there a specific term for the team that bats second?

I am studying the similarities between Cricket and Baseball. I understood that every Baseball game consists of a series of innings (7-9 depending on the league) where one team tries to score as much ...
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2answers
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What do I call software as opposed to DB/DBMS?

In my documentation I'm trying to refer to the program in context of interaction with database / DBMS as opposed to the latter. How do I call such program or software? "Outbound", "outer", "calling", ...
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3answers
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How to differentiate from multiple interpretations of the word “language”

Suppose I'm currently writing an introduction to programming languages. One of my paragraphs start as follows: Everyone can learn how to program. It is like learning a new language. [...] In ...
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4answers
162 views

What official English words describe these activities?

Court man goes to bank, and ask for information about suspect's account. Court man goes to bank, and ask for taking steps to control suspect's account, such as freeze suspect's account or unfreeze ...
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0answers
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Modern Term for Right/Secondary Click

In order to access secondary functions in a graphical interface (such as a context menu), users often have to "right click" an object on the screen. Some variations of this terminology I have seen ...
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“Digital computer” in the 1940s

I was watching the DVD movie Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing, the British mathematician who helped crack the Nazi's enigma code in WWII. In one key scene, Turing uses the ...
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3answers
176 views

Why is German anti-aircraft fire called “Archibald”?

Reading The War Illustrated (January 30th, 1915 number), I came across this passage:- At this speed they offer a comparatively stationary mark for the German anti-aircraft guns, always known as ...
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3answers
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What is the correct term for a must-answer-correctly question in a test?

In some tests a question is critical, ie. answering that question incorrectly makes you fail the whole test, even if that's your only wrong answer. I tried serching for 'sudden death question' but it ...
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1answer
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Is “Inversely Proportional” the right term here?

The effort required to design something is inversely proportional to the simplicity of the result. -Roy T. Fielding, http://roy.gbiv.com/untangled/2008/rest-apis-must-be-hypertext-driven ...
2
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1answer
86 views

Which one is common: “Diagnostic” or “Diagnostics”

I'm translating the interface texts of an industrial control panel software and got stuck on this one. The module I'm referring to has some lists containing the sensors and switches for the digital ...
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2answers
37 views

Term for “representative” animal sound?

Is there a term for the sound word associated with a certain type of animal, that is considered the most frequent or usual representation? e.g. Cat - meow; Duck - quack; Owl - whoo; Frog - ribbit; ...
2
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1answer
114 views

Correct term for computer language that's close to human in syntax

I've always used the term canonical syntax to refer to a computer language, the syntax of which is verbose and resembles the patter in conventional human speech. Recently, I learned that canonical ...
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2answers
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A Term for a Location Where a Person has Stopped or Idled for an allocated length of time

I am developing a Geographic Information System where GPS coordinates are gathered and analyzed in a server. I have a module where I collect coordinates/points in a map where a person has stopped for ...
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8answers
1k views

Word for the opposite of digital art

I'm looking for a word to distinguish digital artwork from non-digital artwork. I've already looked at various suggestions for the opposite of the word digital, but none seem to fit the concept. ...
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3answers
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Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?

Occasionally, as part of the release of an original movie, the production company will commission a writer to produce a full-length novel based on the script. This happened recently, for example, with ...
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What does the phrase “this the new vivy and millennium wavy” mean? Is it a slang?

I was listening to the new Chris Brown's album, "Royalty" and the last track/song called "U Did It" which features the rapper Future has the following line that I didn't understand at all: I just ...
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0answers
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Is there a more accurate way to describe “short vowels” and “long vowels”?

I was taught in primary school about "short vowels" vs "long vowels". Although it is a simplistic way to teach children, it is also inaccurate, because the sounds are different, not just longer and ...
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2answers
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What is the term for following a number, ie: ten (10) with the numeric version for clarity

I see this a fair bit in journal papers, and wanted to know if there is a specific reason and/or term for this: having the spelled/lexical version of a number followed by the literal/logical ...