Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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503 views

“Order of magnitude” for changes in prefix

Order of magnitude usually denotes a change of a factor of 10. Is there a similar term for a change by a factor of 1000? For example: Kb -> Mb Tb -> Gb Edit: I agree that you can just say "three ...
1
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2answers
466 views

Deconstruction of the phrase “some variety of” to refer to a single type or class of object

In informal English, I often see the phrase "some variety of" referring to a singular classification of a particular object of a sentence. For example: That appears to be some variety of plant. ...
8
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2answers
334 views

What do you call Xo-Y words? (ex: Judeo-Christian)

Is there a special name to call words like Judeo-Christian, following the construction Xo-Y? (Same question for French)
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4answers
2k views

What is a “Norman genitive”? [closed]

I have encountered such a term, and I have no idea what it is. Could it be 'of'?
10
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2answers
39k views

What term is used for the closing of a letter?

Salutation is the term used to describe the beginning of a letter or other correspondence. What is the term used for the closing of a letter? Here are some examples: Yours truly, Sincerely, Best ...
10
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6answers
8k views

Proper term for people from eastern Asia

I once posted an article on the web in which I referred collectively to people from China, Japan, and the Koreas as "Oriental". I got an email from someone who informed me that this is an offensive ...
3
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1answer
143 views

Meaning of “float a deadpoint”

In a book about climbing technique (written by an American) I found the following expression: ...: floating a deadpoint from any one of a million different body positions. While the meaning of ...
3
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1answer
30k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English ...
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3answers
195 views

Image in article

What would you call an image in a newspaper article that appears in the flow of the article with text wrapped around it? For example an article with two columns — on the right column there's an image ...
3
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3answers
168 views

Is “constringence” a word?

I would like to express, in one word, the tendency to concentrate excessively rather than disperse. This is applied in a sentence where I describe a set of data, which has too much focus on one aspect ...
7
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3answers
3k views

Is “wtf” an abbreviation or a euphemism?

In the English language we have a lot of euphemisms for profanities that take the form of abbreviations; for instance, people may say the f-word or the s-word if they don't want to say fuck and shit. ...
11
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7answers
2k views

“Bear market” / “Bull market” : what relationship those animals have with economy?

A bull market is a upward trend and a bear market a downward trend, but how did those animals end up in financial terminology?
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3answers
965 views

A generic term for both fast-forward and rewind modes?

I'd like to add an option to some program that would control the speed (or more exactly the delay between steps) in fast-forward or rewind modes. I don't know how to name it. If it wasn't for the ...
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1answer
1k views

What do you call a man who desires to have a lifelong, non-sexual but intimate relationship with a woman? [closed]

The man lives in the same house with a woman but he never has sex or desires to have sex. He is comfortable being nude with her and so is she, but there is no sexual touching or lust. He cuddles her ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Word for “library staff member”

I'm looking for a word to indicate a member of a library's staff. The obvious choice, librarian, is not appropriate, because it refers to someone with a specific degree, usually in Library or ...
1
vote
2answers
366 views

What type of phrase is “done”?

Examples are provided aplenty, from chef Gordon Ramsay: Fry. Roast. Drizzle. Done. Drizzle olive into the sauce circling the fish. Done. But you also see the term used on buttons in ...
4
votes
5answers
612 views

What's a more formal name for a “third” party?

Two parties are trying to resolve some dispute that involves interest of both. Sometimes it's hard for them to reach an agreement on a fair basis. This is typically when another party who has no ...
3
votes
4answers
307 views

A rude equivalent to a “TV box” term

I am looking for an American English term for a "TV box" as a source of zombification and brain killing. Maybe "boob tube" is the right one? The shorter, the better.
4
votes
2answers
441 views

Plural of “copula”, does “copulas” or “copulae” sound more professional?

When talking in linguistics topics about the word "to be" and its foreign language equivalents like Spanish "ser" and "estar", the name of this kind of special verb is "copula". But copula has two ...
3
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3answers
209 views

Are “academic society” and “industrial society” correct?

I'm writing a Personal Statement and I need to say something like "this research topic is hot in both academic society and industrial society". Are these phrases correct?
21
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9answers
3k views

How can I translate the words for the two types of bathrooms found in Russia into English?

I work in real estate, and sometimes I have to translate respective inscriptions from my native Russian into English. I get stuck in some cases where not only linguistic, but cultural differences have ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

“I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream”- Is there a term that describes this 'word play'?

What is the term that describes the word play found below? “I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream” Another example might be the punchline: "Orange you glad to see me"?
4
votes
2answers
465 views

What is the “not only … but also” sentence pattern called?

"Not only ... But also" What is this sentence pattern called in English grammar? How can I find these patterns?
3
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2answers
262 views

“Supreme court” vs. “highest court”

I just read an article about aided suicide on Toronto Star which mentioned B.C. supreme court and Canada's highest court. Do supreme court and highest court mean the same thing? The different ...
5
votes
2answers
13k views

How should I say the “relationship” between the professor and student in America?

When I apply for the admission to the graduate school in America, I need to provide the "Recommendation Provider" in the online system. What should I write when I am asked "relationship to you"? ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Is “Windows-based PC” a correct term in American English?

I am writing a support message to a customer support of an audio hardware vendor. I need to describe them that I am running Microsoft Windows as the main OS on my computer. Is "Windows-based PC" term ...
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4answers
1k views

What is the subjunctive mood?

I had always understood the subjunctive mood to mean a hypothetical present tense. However, I think it might also imply that the hypothetical event is outside the realm of possibility. Is that ...
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1answer
371 views

Looking for a technical term that goes hand in hand with the strategy used in the joke [closed]

Here's the joke: Tom's Dad:(in Bill Gates's office) My son Tom wants to marry your daughter. Are you interested? Bill: No, my daughter is still too young. Tom's Dad: What if my son is a VP at ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the origin and prevalence of the term “server” meaning “wait(er/ress)”?

In a comment on this question, the term "server" is used to refer to the guy working at the register in a pizza restaurant. I have never heard this usage before (in Australia), and was only able to ...
3
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2answers
5k views

Are 'dysfunction' and 'malfunction' complete synonyms?

Dictionaries give both dysunction and malfunction the meaning 'failure to function properly'. Are they complete synonyms?
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3answers
13k views

Antonym of “phobia”

If a phobia is to have an irrational fear of something, what is the word for having an irrational affinity for something? For example a numerologist may fear the number 13, but be attracted to (or ...
6
votes
3answers
520 views

Is there an English grammar equivalent of the Italian “complemento”

In Italian, translating from the Italian wikipedia as accurately as I can muster, a "complemento" is a part of a sentence (one or more words) that specify, clarify and enrich the meaning thereof. ...
5
votes
2answers
693 views

History of use of the term “organism”

I have found that the term "organism" does not originate from any writings of Aristotle or some other ancient Greek, though Aristotle freely uses the term "organon", spelled "organ" in English, to ...
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2answers
14k views

What is the person called whom you give a recommendation?

If person A gives person B a recommendation, can you call A recommender and B recommendee or are these words made up? I've seen both forms used in everyday language (e.g. magazines), but never in a ...
4
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2answers
364 views

What is the name of combination, in error, of similar or related words? (E.g.: segueway)

Is there a technical term for combination, in error, of similar or related words? This question is prompted by the following malapropism or solecism, from an article by Elizabeth Montalbano in ...
8
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6answers
2k views

Is there a better term for 'low-level?'

In computer programming, low-level means something used as a base upon which to build more complex mechanisms. To the untrained ear, I think the term might imply inferiority, which is simply not the ...
3
votes
5answers
10k views

Relation between “concept” and “conception”

concept: an abstract idea; a general notion conception: the way in which something is perceived or regarded These two words are troubling me because it seems that there is a way that concept ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

A person you have a relationship for only business

In a piece of software, what would I call a person you have a relationship for only business in real life. He/she is not your friend and you are not working in same place. For instance, you are ...
12
votes
9answers
6k views

What is the word for something that is punishable by law, but is not a crime?

What is the legal term in English for something that is punishable by law, but is not a crime (i.e. does not affect your criminal record)? I mean all the lesser (than crime) violations of the law, ...
2
votes
2answers
276 views

Omitting the definite article before “problem is”

I've noticed that the definite article is often omitted preceding the word "problem" in newspapers and magazines. Not in speech, but just in print. Here's an example: Many politicians feel that ...
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2answers
256 views

Is “underlying” the right word?

I am describing a mathematical model, where the probability density function of a variable is made up of two contributions, two distributions. Mathematically we would say that f(x) = g1(x) + g2(x). ...
9
votes
13answers
70k views

How can I describe someone who feels little or no emotion?

I don't mean someone who lacks emotion because they "don't care", but because either they can't feel emotion or the emotional response is delayed because of a genetic disposition. Maybe there is an ...
8
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2answers
5k views

When someone says “that explanation was a lot of hand-waving” what does this mean?

I've been hearing term "hand-waving" thrown around a lot, especially when my peers describe their CS(computer science) classes. Does anyone know what that term means in this context? (also a little ...
3
votes
1answer
122 views

Term for emergent system with its own logical rules/laws?

Eigenlogik in German means that a subsystem has its own set of rules determining its phenomenological behavior. E.g. in sociology, a social group of humans shows a group behavior based on rules/laws ...
3
votes
2answers
299 views

Will my audience understand the phrase “lead time”?

...results in a relatively long lead time for our software products. Should I use this expression in an article for average software developers? (i.e. an international Java magazine) Would it ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the correct grammatical term for clauses expressing the goal or a target of an action expressed in the main clause?

What's the correct grammatical term for clauses expressing the goal or a target of an action expressed in the main clause? For example: Jack gave me his cell phone so that I could call my Mom. Dad ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What term is most appropriate when describing the infinite space of possibilities created through inductive reasoning?

In arguments contrasting the differences between deductive reasoning and inductive reasoning, it is often pointed out that deductive reasoning is, by definition, bounded by the terms described in the ...
8
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3answers
4k views

Why does “air conditioning” always mean “cooling” and never “heating”?

For that matter, air conditioning could include humidifying or dehumidifying, but it doesn't: only cooling. Why weren't air conditioners called air coolers?
2
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1answer
234 views

What is the name for the class of computer programs that act as a front end for a database? [closed]

If you are writing a computer program that manages a large database of clients, like a rolodex, or a program that stores medical records for patients. What is that "class" of program called. The ...
11
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4answers
18k views

What are the treads on the side of the highway called?

On the sides of most highways (in the U.S. at least), there are rough treads just outside the travel lanes to snap a driver to attention if the vehicle is drifting off the road. Is there a name for ...