Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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7
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1answer
208 views

What is the name of words like 'bottle' or 'clove' that provide a singular for a counted item?

Title pretty much askes the question. What is the term for words like 'bottle', 'cup' or 'clove' (as in clove of garlic). Are they counters, countables, determiners...? I swear it's on the tip of ...
3
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3answers
10k views

Present Progressive or Present Continuous?

What is the correct term used to describe this tense in English — Present Progressive or Present Continuous? I see both terms used in grammar books.
4
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4answers
1k views

Repeating the consonant in many words in a sentence or phrase

In the movie 'V for Vendetta' you have for example (bold part): Evey: Who are you? V. : Who? Who is but the form following the function of what and what I am is a man in a mask. Evey: ...
13
votes
2answers
4k views

What is the difference between a phrase and a clause?

What is the difference between a phrase and a clause? I tried looking this in dictionary but can not identify the difference. It would be great if I could get an example and formula of what makes a ...
55
votes
5answers
47k views

“log in to” or “log into” or “login to”

When writing an instruction about connecting to a computer using ssh, telnet, etc., I'm not sure what spacing to use in this familiar spoken phrase: "Log in to host.com" "Log into host.com" "Login ...
54
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8answers
6k views

Which term correctly identifies those who enjoy programming/technology: “geek” or “nerd”?

Which term correctly identifies those who enjoy and are involved with programming and technology, geek or nerd?
5
votes
1answer
303 views

A Photoshop term for “body double” or “doppelgänger”

I saw a tutorial on TV. The tutorial was like this: Take your snap sitting on chair, another standing on left side of chair and then last one standing on the right side of the chair. Now, use ...
6
votes
1answer
104 views

Is there a proper way to refer to the “source” and “destination” of a phrase used in communication?

The terms topic or subject can be used to describe what a sentence refers to. What are the proper terms for the "source" (the person who is speaking or writing) and "destination" (the person who is ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

What are words called that share the same root?

What do you call words that share the same root (e.g., "network", "networks", "networking"). Also, does the shortest one of them have a specific name (e.g., "network")?
3
votes
3answers
596 views

Can I get an example of statement that can be said to be Hofstadterian?

Can I get an example of statement that can be said to be Hofstadterian? Also please provide a small comment with the statement if possible. thankyou.
5
votes
1answer
703 views

Term for words indicating capability other than “adjective”

The words edible and manageable are adjectives, but is there a more specific term for such words indicating capability?
5
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3answers
639 views

Where did the “three fingered salute” come from?

Where did the phrase "three-fingered salute", meaning to press CTRL-ALT-DELETE on the keyboard, come from? As the "two-fingered salute" appears to be a mainly British gesture, I suspect the ...
4
votes
1answer
331 views

“Position” as verb to use in graphical user interface discussions?

What's the correct term to use for "positioning" elements in a graphic user interface? For example, if I say: Where should we position the button A? Is that a correct (and professional) way to ...
16
votes
3answers
86k views

Difference between an acronym and abbreviation?

TLA is an acronym for "Three Letter Acronym". Is it also an abbreviation, since it abbreviates the original phrase?
4
votes
2answers
854 views

How to refer to “mainland Europe”

As a Europhile living in England, it really bothers me when journalists refer to mainland Europe as "Europe". We're in Europe! But I appreciate that it offers a neat shorthand for referring to the ...
10
votes
4answers
8k views

What are: province, territory, protectorate, state…?

Often a country will have regions called "provinces" or "states". Other times they are called "territories" and "protectorates". Is there a generic term for these words? Is there a full list of ...
8
votes
3answers
747 views

What is the word to describe a single object to represent the many?

If I am writing a poem, I might use the word peaches to symbolize all fruit. Is there a specific word for this type of symbolism?
7
votes
6answers
575 views

Do “normal people” know the terms URL and GUI?

Would an English-speaking but non-technical audience be familiar with the terms URL (in the sense of link, web address) and GUI (Graphical User Interface), for example in a manual aimed at end users? ...
4
votes
5answers
6k views

Alternatives to “computationally expensive”?

The current version of a sentence I'm writing has the structure: Computing [such and such] is the most computationally expensive part of [algorithm]. At the moment, I cannot think of a better ...
11
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5answers
15k views

How does one pronounce the '@' symbol?

How can I pronounce @ symbol: At / At the rate? Can I use it in a sentence? Please explain with an example.
11
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4answers
2k views

A special use of “should”?

I saw a sentence like this: Wilkinson is contesting the release, and threatened to sue should it be released. I could understand it but do you know what do they call this kind of use of "should" ...
10
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the best term to describe a “native English speaker who is an American”?

When applying for English teaching jobs, I want to describe myself as a "native speaker of English who has an American accent" since most companies in Europe want native speakers to teach English ...
9
votes
9answers
21k views

What does “I know, right?” mean?

Not only is my seventh grader using this phrase, but her teachers are as well. I suppose it means I totally agree with you and you totally agree with me but it sounds like there is a subtle Is that ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

What does “graduate applicant” mean?

Does the term "graduate applicant" mean "a person who applies to get graduated" or "a graduate who applies for something"? If it is the second one, what can we call a person who applies for a ...
16
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6answers
21k views

Difference between “commentor” and “commentator”

What is the difference between commentor and commentator? Is commentor or commenter a legitimate English word?
13
votes
1answer
3k views

Logging in or on?

There are a plethora of words for user accounts, like logon, login, signon, and also the action of logging in (or logging on) or signing in. Are there any usage guidelines here?
9
votes
1answer
919 views

Rhyming conventions of Early Modern English

I was reading the poem "To His Coy Mistress" by Andrew Marvell when something struck me as odd. Let me quote two passages: Thou by the Indian Ganges' side Shouldst rubies find: I by the tide ...
11
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4answers
4k views

English term for a word that differs from another one by just one letter

When I was a child, pretty much every children's magazine I subscribed to used to publish those little word-chain games where you had to get from one word to another — often an antonym — by replacing ...
8
votes
7answers
2k views

What does “akin to” mean in etymologies in dictionary entries?

Many etymologies in dictionaries say that some word is “akin to” a word in some other language. For example, here is part of the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary entry for salt: Main Entry: 1salt ...
6
votes
2answers
26k views

Is there a fine line between symbolism and metaphors in literature?

Assume we have a literary masterpiece that is abundant in symbolism and metaphors. Within this masterpiece, the author uses a brook running through a glade of trees to represent a couple of things ...
3
votes
5answers
470 views

Which is correct: “web host” or “web hoster”?

Which is the best way to refer to a company that hosts your website: My web host supports Ruby. or My web hoster supports Ruby. or My web hosting service supports Ruby.
15
votes
4answers
12k views

Is it correct to call an Apple Mac computer a PC (Personal Computer)

From the original meaning of the initialism, PC (Personal Computer), it would make perfect sense to call a Mac a PC, as it is just that, a personal computer. However, the vast majority of people ...
5
votes
1answer
250 views

Is there a word for the single letter contractions commonly used in store names? (see examples)

Is there a term for the single letter contractions as used in the following examples? Toys 'r' us Stop 'n' go Note: Trademarks above corrected for proper grammar.
6
votes
4answers
533 views

Is domain-specific meaning acceptable/advisable when used in a document directed outside the domain?

Here's the problem. Many common terms in the programmer's lexicon--i.e., used in information communication and in published texts--are identical to everyday words; others are slight 'distortions' of ...
8
votes
5answers
2k views

What do you call the word used in prose to describe the surroundings to make prose richer?

There is a word in English which is used to describe the technique used by authors where they describe the surroundings (like sight, sounds, smells, etc.) to make the scene more rich. Like "there was ...
25
votes
11answers
28k views

What is the most professional name for “squiggly bracket”?

I am creating a software training video and need to refer to these brackets: { } I usually call them "squiggly brackets" or "curly brackets". Is there a more professional name?
27
votes
4answers
21k views

How does the phrase “used to” work, grammatically?

It is common to hear people say "used to" to indicate that they did something in the past but no longer do; for example, "I used to play basketball." How would "used to," used in that context, fit ...