Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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what is the word or term used calling kleenex for tissues or pampers for diaper [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is a word/phrase for using a term for a popular special case instead of a generic term? I remember there is an English term or word used to describe this. Dell for ...
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2answers
799 views

Why doesn't “campaign” have the meaning of “countryside” in English?

The English word campaign comes from the French word campagne, which has two basic meanings: battle, countryside. It seems that when this word came to English, only the "battle" meaning was kept ...
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Name of 3 dots to indicate a pause in speech

Answers to this question show that it is quite common to use the 'ellipsis' (three dots) in English writing to indicate a pause in speech for reasons of "confusion, insecurity, distress, or ...
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3answers
461 views

Law term that means that some document, paper or deal has no power in law

Law term that means that some document, paper or deal has no power in law. In Russian it is ничтожность (ничтожный договор), in Ukrainian it's нікчемність (нікчемний договір). I've already asked it ...
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What do you call the phenomenon where a rectangle □ is shown because a font lacks a glyph?

Is there a name to describe the situation where a particular character is shown on a computer screen in a particular font, but this font does not have a glyph for this particular character? Usually, ...
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1answer
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Is there a term for a word that is the same upside-down?

I know palindrome is the term for a word that works backwards and forwards, but is there a similar term for a word that can be flipped/reversed and remain the same? For example, the word SWIMS or the ...
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5answers
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Is there a name for how the Irish use so, so?

There is an Irish English structural usage of the word so, that is I think unique to Ireland. Are we going to the cinema, so? Where is the dog, so? The word so is unneeded and seems to mean ...
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547 views

What does “Toff's error” mean?

"He's invited the wife and I" and other similar sentences are referred to as Toff's error. What is, precisely, the meaning of this term?
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3answers
900 views

Name of a sequence of moves in martial arts?

What is the name of a fixed sequence of moves used in training of martial arts? Precisely, used in training, not in actual combat, as both parties know exactly what is to come and follow a fixed ...
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1answer
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Term for mentioning X by saying “I will not say X” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the origin of the phrase “not to mention …” Is there a name for “I don't mean to…, but” phrases? Is there a term for ...
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Term to describe the mass changeover in land ownership

I am looking for a word to describe the above. The context is where, after the Irish famine in the 1840's, entire villages were abandoned and the land was re-distributed to new tenants. This happened ...
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Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?

This sounds like a silly question, but I've heard some very strong opinions about this, so I find this intriguing. A hot dog is a type of sausage (at least according to Merriam-Webster, Wikipedia, ...
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Strong verbs, weak verbs, and other categories

For verb conjugations, I know that in English we have certain verbs which umlaut ablaut in their principle parts: sing-sang-sung We have verbs that add an -ed to the end: laugh-laughed and ...
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2answers
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Instrumented? What is a good explanation/definition of the word. (English: Tech Jargon)

What is a good explanation/definition of the word Instrumented? as in "Good code needs to be instrumented..." I did a brief web search, but the few places it pops up seem to also be full of jargon, ...
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2answers
141 views

What's the term for untapped capacity or inventory that is brought to market by rising prices?

I want to answer this question on Homebrew.SE, but I'm at an uncharacteristic loss for words. One example of the concept I'm trying to describe is gold that had heretofore been sitting in people's ...
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8answers
851 views

What is the correct way of saying: press a button multiple times, but don't hold it down for too long?

I would like to combine the "Press the button repeatedly" and "Press the button shortly" into one sentence, but the "repeatedly shortly" does not seem correct to me. Even the "shortly" seems not the ...
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2answers
138 views

Term or phrase representing all objects inside of a parent object

I am programming an iOS App and I have an alert popup that asks a user to confirm the deletion of a directory. I want to show the following message: "DIR is not empty! Deleting this folder will ...
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5answers
592 views

What is the term or phrase to describe some process is sequential independent? [closed]

By "sequential independent", I mean the process remains the same no matter how you change the order of its subroutines. Better to be some term frequently used in math or engineering.
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4answers
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What exactly is a shindig? [closed]

What exactly is a shindig? I tried to translate it in Google Translate into spanish but it gave me two translations Fiesta (party) Pelea (fight) So which one is it? Update The context I heard ...
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2answers
698 views

Is there a term for the opposite of the greengrocer’s apostrophe?

Is there a term for the tendency to omit the apostrophe in high-profile items where it would otherwise be expected? – such as “Student Manual” instead of “Student’s Manual” (and “Facilitator Guide” ...
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0answers
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Terminology of roles in a Q&A: The “asker” and “answerer”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What do you call somebody who asks a question and somebody who answers a question? If you have one person in the role of asking questions, and another person in the role ...
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What's the most pedantically correct way to reference sectioned and numbered rules aloud?

I am a roller derby announcer. An important part of my job is to explain the rules of roller derby to the fans. The rules of modern roller derby are promulgated by the Women's Flat Track Derby ...
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3answers
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Non-pejorative term for 'alcohol aficionado'?

Is there a non-pejorative term analogous to "foodie" but in the context of alcoholic drinks? Everything that comes to mind suggests some form of alcoholism or affinity for binge-drinking. More ...
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4answers
748 views

“Border protection” vs “boarder protection” [closed]

Is the term boarder protection valid? It has 52,500 results on Google. What is the difference between boarder protection and border protection?
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4answers
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Continuous vs contiguous when talking about files

Files on a file system can be fragmented meaning they're split into several parts that are scattered all over hard disk. This usually means that reading these files is much slower because disk ...
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5answers
371 views

Word for “the question this one was closed as a dupe of”

Is there a simple term for the question this one was closed as a dupe of other than "the question this one was closed as a dupe of", because "the question this one was closed as a dupe of" is pretty ...
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4answers
1k views

Are Americans familiar with the term “mobile” when referring to a “cellphone”?

In the UK we call them "mobile phones", in the US "cellphones". However, would an American be familiar with the term "mobile" when referring to something pertaining to cellphones or would it sound ...
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Are freshwater fish considered seafood? [closed]

Can freshwater fish, crayfish, etc. still be referred to as seafood or is there a special term?
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1answer
1k views

Is there a technical term for the two halves of an email address? [closed]

Is there a technical name for the two halves of an email address? I mean the parts before and after the @ sign. As a kind of example of what I mean, for UK postcodes, I believe the two halves are ...
6
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1answer
201 views

Technical term for “copy-catting nature”

There is a term for copy-catting nature for practical situations such as cars, systems, etc. For example an engineering project where some part is designed according to bird wing. This methodology of ...
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8answers
851 views

Is there a name/term for phrasing something such that to disagree implicates yourself?

For example: Now available in all good stores. . . where to not agree to stock an item suggests that your store is not good, or: All rational people agree that. . . where to refuse to ...
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1answer
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Is there a term for a word of one meaning but variable pronunciation? [closed]

For example, "advertisement", and "component". edit: Here's the full list that I have compiled that I had in mind: advertisement Arkansas asterisk athelete auxiliary Berkeley builded component coupon ...
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Is jargon proper English? [closed]

Examples: Database Performant Hyperlink Are these correct usages of English, or not, and why?
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8answers
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X, Y, Z — horizontal, vertical and …?

When working in a 2D coordinate system you could say that X is the horizontal axis and Y is the vertical axis. Extending this to 3D, is there a similar word for the Z axis? (I'm aware of Width, ...
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3answers
1k views

Term for buzzing or hissing sound often created by vibration

Specifically, I am referring to the hissing, buzzing, S-like, or fuzzy sound that is created when electronic speakers play sounds or music near their volume or frequency limits. I recall having ...
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4answers
22k views

What's the opposite of “oxymoron”?

What's the opposite of oxymoron? That is, two words put together that seem identical?
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3answers
151 views

Term to describe users' initial dislike of user interface change

What is the best term to describe the fact that most users have an initial dislike of any change to a UI even though it may really be net better over time? Note: Question originally appeared as a ...
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3answers
2k views

Is 'colorblind' the best word for people with color perception deficiencies? [closed]

I'm creating an application that has a checkbox to assist colorblind users. I'm not so fond of the term because it isn't accurate, but at the same time I don't want to seem overtly politically ...
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4answers
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Can the subject of a portrait be an animal?

The answers to question "What is the definition of portrait photography?" seem to imply that the subject of a portrait has to be a person or a group of people. This isn't directly expressed in the ...
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4answers
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Name to distinguish between parameters used for 'is not equal' operations and those used for 'is equal' operations

I am writing a dating website (for example) which allows a person to search for partners matching certain features. i.e "non-blondes in New York". I am having trouble trying to find the perfect words ...
3
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4answers
1k views

What is the literary term for the redemption act of a character?

For example: in the story Star Wars, you have the story Darth Vader. In the second movie, a plot twist reveals Darth Vader as Lukes father. At the end of third, he then undergoes _ where he kills the ...
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1answer
2k views

What the definition for “Itsy Bitsy” term? [closed]

Like on the Itsy Bitsy Spider I heard it in some lyrics but I don't know what this mean indeed.
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1answer
2k views

What do you call a quote from an article that is displayed prominently in the article itself?

When you're reading an article, often you'll see a quote from the very same article written in large, bold letters. I guess it's supposed to entice skimmers to read it or some such. What is that ...
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5answers
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In navigation, what's the difference between bearing, heading, direction, and course?

Specifically, in real-world use, I would think that "course" and "heading" tend to imply a vector of movement, while "bearing" and "direction" might refer only to which way one is facing. I am ...
8
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3answers
375 views

What is a “magnetic shaped charge”

Just reading this article and in one of the first sentences it says: A few days ago, 32-year-old Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan died in his car, after two motorcyclists attached a magnetic shaped charge ...
2
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3answers
344 views

Term for a powerful personal computer?

What term would an enthusiast use to describe a powerful, tripped-out personal computer, the kind he might custom-build in his garage and overclock to the max? The usual reference sources are failing ...
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2answers
225 views

Term for an event being referred to by its location or date

Is there a term for referring to an organization by its city rather than by its name? mentions synecdoche and metonym as terms used when an organization is referred to by its location. Do these terms ...
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2answers
2k views

Is there a term for words that are sounded out initialisms?

The words "okay" and "emcee" seem to both be somewhat widely accepted (at least, I can find both in several dictionaries). But it seems to be agreed that these are simply sounded-out spellings of the ...
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1answer
2k views

When did “gay” become associated with homosexuality? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gay (homosexual) and gay (happy) I'm curious if there's a definitive moment where the word "gay" started being applied to homosexuals. Was it a specific coining, or just ...
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4answers
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What would the job title be for someone who organizes parties?

I'm currently searching for the right term for someone who Organizes or Promotes Parties, "Clubbings", Events or similar. I understand that there's a difference between someone who promotes a ...