Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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What is the category name of words that can take 2 objects? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What do you call a verb which accepts 2 nouns? The function f assigns each value of x a value of f(x). Please show me what you have done. I tell you the truth. What ...
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842 views

Is there a term for referencing the main character in a first-person song?

Is there a specific word for the protagonist when the singer sings from the protagonist's point of view? For example, in the song "Two Is Better Than One" by Boys Like Girls: I remember what you ...
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3answers
174 views

“The author is by Katherine Patterson” — what is the term for the error in this sentence?

I am marking some student work and one of the sentences was The author is by Katherine Patterson. What is the term for the error in this sentence?
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58 views

Are 'next Friday' and 'this Friday' the same? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to? To me, they both mean the same thing, the upcoming Friday, but I know people who say that 'next Friday' is the one ...
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637 views

Term for “a pattern that repeats once induced”

For example, let's say that I went to sleep one night at 5:00 am. Out of exhaustion, I would most likely sleep until the late afternoon. Since I woke up so late, I wouldn't be tired until very early ...
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What are questions like “why did the chicken cross the road” called?

What are questions like Why did the chicken cross the road? called? I want to know if there is a particular term given to these type of questions.
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What is the process called to change “fire” → “fiery”?

It's clearly not "conjugation", and I'm not even sure which keywords to use for google to help on this. Without having time to dedicate my next few days to read though linguistics textbooks, I thought ...
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Hyphens in verb construction containing prefix such as “re”

In semi-formal business writing in the United States, I often observe that writers tend to add a hyphen between a prefix and the root infinitive of verbs. In many of the cases, the resulting verb ...
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Is there a term or short description for an accent you “can't place”?

Some examples of this might be Standard American English (though this may still be tied to geography) or, more likely, Received Pronunciation. The speaker's language doesn't have to be English, of ...
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1answer
369 views

What is the correct usage of a charged-off or charged off loan in the Financial space? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Does proper grammar dictate a preference towards using "charged-off" or "charged off" to describe a loan ...
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What is the difference between “revenue” and “income”? [closed]

It seems that revenue and income have the same meaning. However, they seem to be used differently. What is the difference between them? When should we use one and not the other?
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Terminology for pairs of words with the same meaning, similar or same pronunciation but different spelling

Is there a term describe word pairs like colour/color that have the same meaning, similar or same pronunciation but a different spelling? The most common examples I can think of are English/American ...
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What are specific cartoon-type interjections like “cough” and “sigh” called in English?

In comics, for example those by Walt Disney, interjections that describe or emphasize in words what the characters in the image are doing are quite commonly used (cough, sigh, tweet). According to ...
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0answers
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List of expertise levels from beginner to expert [closed]

I am looking for a list from beginner to expert in as much as possible steps. I have constructed by myself: Newbie Novice Rookie Beginner Talented Skilled Intermediate Skillful Seasoned Proficient ...
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1answer
378 views

Category of words — 'another', 'an additional', “an alternative”, etc

I'm afraid I've had a sudden lapse of memory and have forgotten what category these kinds of words belong to. These words are used to expand upon another point within the same category. For example: ...
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1k views

What is the word for nouns with gender-specific forms?

Thought I would try a question with visual aid.* The image below shows Claire Danes, "Actor", in a kiosk poster for the Met. The variation in usage between actor and actress for female thespians is ...
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3answers
806 views

What is it called when a letter is within another letter?

What is it called when a letter is within another letter? For example, the letter O within the letter L: Edit: Or the first C in the Coca-Cola logo: Does this arrangement of type have a name?
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2answers
778 views

Is there a name for this method of writing that includes pictograms?

I've seen people write (usually in a humorous way) a 'code-like' message where parts of words are replaced with a pictogram that sounds like that word-part. E.G.: (eyeball) (tin can)(rope knot) ...
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2answers
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“Paintings on walls and ceilings” and “painting of portraits, landscapes”

I am creating a portfolio of painter's works and I need to categorize them. There will be two global categories: Paintings on canvas Painting on walls and ceilings The paintings on canvas divide ...
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2answers
196 views

What's the correct way to imply that a course is not taken online?

I'd like to know how I should write on my CV that some courses I've taken were taken online (i.e. on websites, through videos and such) while others were actually taken on an institute/school etc. ...
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8answers
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Term for easing up sails in a heavy storm

What is the correct verb (or phrase) to describe the action of reducing a boat's sail power in a heavy storm? So far, I've only come up with reefing the sails, but that refers to the furling of the ...
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2answers
235 views

In a jet cockpit: “console” or “instrument panel”?

What is the correct term for the panel containing standard indicators such as the altimeter and airspeed indicator in a jet aircraft cockpit? Is it called console or instrument panel, or are both ...
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1answer
409 views

Newspaper vocabulary for news positioning

I'm looking for a term that In Brazilian Portuguese we call "diagramming", which is used to characterize the work of positioning news in a newspaper, setting image places and text flow of a page. In ...
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Origin of word “pad” in the mixing/recording industry

I ask this assuming there are enough people with experience with electric instruments, mixers, and other recording equipment to make this relevant. On any mixer, one of the first buttons that can be ...
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5answers
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What’s the difference between “tool” and “utility”?

I find these two words appear together often, especially mentioned as tool and utility for the Unix operating system. So I am wondering about the difference between them.
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No possibilities are ruled out

Suppose that two binary (yes-no) qualities are being considered. Often (yes, actually!) I want to express that all four combinations are possible: yes-yes, yes-no, no-yes, no-no. Is there a concise ...
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4answers
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The verb for carrying out a bitwise OR/AND operation

I'm writing a scientific/technical text which involves describing some low level code. I need to complete the following sentence: When two values are combined, their tags are _ _ _ _ _ _ together ...
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3answers
640 views

What type of clause is this?

Can anyone say what type of clause this is — noun, adjective or adverbial? I am glad that you have passed the test. Some people say that it is a noun clause. But I am not sure. What is the ...
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1answer
446 views

Term for use of descriptor or noun in place of proper name?

What is the term for the literary use of a 'descriptor' in place of a proper name, as in Shakespeare's play Much Ado about Nothing, when Benedict refers to Beatrice as "Lady Disdain" instead of Lady ...
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1answer
128 views

What's the name of this pronunciation guide

In dictionaries I see two guides for pronunciation. for example, for the word "ambiguity":  [am-bi-gyoo-i-tee] AND /ˌæmbɪˈgyuɪti/ I know the second one is named IPA. My question is, is there a ...
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1answer
721 views

What's the word for the property of being divisible by a particular number? [closed]

Example: Since x is even (i.e., divisible by 2), its --word-- is true. Since y is odd, y's --word-- is false. The description suggests 'moddity', but there was another word for it... BTW, I ...
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2answers
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What is the word for “turning a noun into an adjective”?

Is there a specific name or term for words that are the adjective form of nouns? Like "salty" from "salt", "Freudian" from "Freud", "glossy" from "gloss", etc.? What about adjective forms of verbs ...
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What is a jaffer?

I have been reading the cricket commentary today and came across an unfamiliar word: jaffer. Anderson continues, surely figuring that someone is going to get Morkel out soon and it bloody well ...
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2answers
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What is the word for this effect: things are not normally noticed until those things come in to the news and people fear/are looking for them

For instance. I've never really paid attention to white vans, but when the DC sniper was at large and they stated that he's probably shooting from a white van, white vans seemed to appear out of no ...
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3answers
732 views

What type of verb is “do”?

I'm going through some code with classes named like: clean_Cache purge_Stage do_Keywords The particular file do_Keywords is a complete mess and maybe if I knew what it was supposed to do then I ...
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1answer
360 views

When was the word “scroll” first used as a verb?

We all know that a scroll is a roll of parchment used in ancient times. A scroll can be rolled up or down, and that must have been the metaphor the creator of the computer-term "scroll" had in mind. ...
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5answers
963 views

Should I use “software defect” or “software bug”?

The "bug" word seems to be so popular that it overshadows "defect" (in search results, in tags somewhere, even Wikipedia article is called "Software bug") despite of looking jargonesque. Is the word ...
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8answers
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Are “disgraceful” and “ungraceful” two different kinds of negations?

"Disgraceful" and "ungraceful" are both derived from negations of "graceful". Wiktionary describes disgraceful as bringing or warranting disgrace; shameful. giving offense to moral sensibilities ...
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What is this ‘-ing’ structure?

Consider the following sentence: The Bactrian camel is well adapted to the extreme climate of its native Mongolia, having thick fur and underwool that keep it warm in winter and also insulate ...
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5answers
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“Plugable” or “pluggable”

When it comes to programming copy edits, there are lots of words that would otherwise be thrown out or replaced. Hive uses a plugable design. Should that be plugable or pluggable? If the ...
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2answers
4k views

What's the raised part of an arch called?

What's that embossed or raised part of an arc or arch called? I am looking for the upper part of the shape, which is kind of raised and forms a mini circle.
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2answers
72 views

Art Photobook in English

I am looking for books that contains photos of paintings and/or statues, historical buildings. These books are typically used as a sort of art gallery on high-quality paper, but I don't know the ...
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3answers
4k views

What are the components of a word called?

The etymology of the word parasol states that it arises "from para- (“to shield”) + sole (“sun”)". I would like to know what the two components, para and sole, are called in this example. ...
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6answers
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A technical term to describe adjectives like “fast”, “long”, “strong”, “large”, “deep”, “loud”, etc

What is the technical term to describe adjectives like fast, long, strong that are used to describe a particular property of an object in relation to another object's? Here is an example. Let's say ...
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1answer
440 views

What is an 'Iron Ring Event'

In a recent podcast of .Net rocks (at 45 minutes 29 seconds), regarding the future of software craftsmanship, it is postulated that there will be an 'Iron Ring Event' (if I heard it correctly). From ...
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5answers
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Accurate British English term for an oblong deck from shore out into a lake where you tie your rowing boat

This is a typical image of the structure in question: There are also some variations, shown in this Google image search. But I'm after the often not very wide, some 20-30 feet long wood ...
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1answer
893 views

Term for Indirect Dialogue

There are two different types of dialogue I'm aware of, that for the moment I'll refer to as 'direct' dialogue and 'indirect' dialogue. However, I know these terms aren't the correct ones, and it's ...
4
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2answers
627 views

Words that define a type of word and also obey that definition [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is a catchy word that means (non-)self-descriptive There are plenty of names for word sets: synonyms: words that have the same meaning palindromes: words that ...
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4answers
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Is the term “baby kitten” / “baby puppy” superfluous?

If "kitten" is a juvenile domestic cat, and "puppy" is a juvenile dog, are "baby kitten" or "baby puppy" superfluous or just extremely specific?
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7answers
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What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...