Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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dividend/divisor vs. numerator/denominator [closed]

From Wikipedia: In the expression a ÷ b = c, a is called the dividend or numerator, b the divisor or denominator and the result c is called the quotient. What's most common (in the context of ...
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1answer
201 views

What is the plural of tablix?

Don't know why the word table wasn't good enough for Microsoft, but SQL Server Reporting Services has a control called a tablix.... But how would I tell you that I have multiple tablix controls? (I ...
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0answers
45 views

What do you call a female that cannot stand other females? [duplicate]

I am looking for a word for a female that cannot easily get along with other females and who prefers not to be around them.
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2answers
483 views

Hypernym for “conjunction” and “disjunction”

Is there a hypernym for conjunction and disjunction, in their logical senses? Just using "junction" doesn't seem right to me.
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5answers
451 views

What is the name given to organisation that hosts other organisations?

There are many businesses that hosts other related or unrelated business as part of their service. Example a plaza/shopping mall will have various stores, owned and operated by others, a university ...
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1answer
1k views

Is there a name for the game where you can ask a question only after answering one?

In Roger Zelazny’s Blood of Amber, Merlin and Vinta Bayle are playing the mutual interview game, in which one gains a right to ask an opponent a question by first answering the opponent's question. ...
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3answers
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What would be the proper abbreviation for an event that has yet occur?

I am looking for an abbreviation for an event that is expected to occur in the future, but has yet to occur. Similar to TBD for to be determined and TBA for to be announced. My events are a series ...
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2answers
811 views

“Release”, “free”, or “delete allocated memory”?

release the allocated memory. free the allocated memory. delete the allocated memory. What are the differences between them?
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1answer
4k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
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4answers
192 views

Term for “Free to play” Videogame that Isn't Free

What is a term for a videogame that, while labeled "Free to Play", is impossible (or extremely slow/tedious) to progress in without spending money on in-game content? Edit: Freemium is a decent ...
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2answers
477 views

Is there a term for “distinguishing between different concepts through the use of different, though synonymous, words”?

Background: A friend mentioned that he wanted to organise a board gaming tournament with 21 players. He opined that there ought to be a way to schedule seven 3-player games so that each player plays ...
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1answer
188 views

Does English possess a term for the study of all aspects of language in primary/secondary schools

Does academic English employ a concise/idiomatic term corresponding to the Russian term словесные дисциплины (literally, "verbal subjects")? The Russian term is from 19th century academic circles ...
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4answers
522 views

Is there a name for the words used after dialogue?

For example, "he said" "she replied" "they inquired."
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1answer
3k views

“What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?”

I am interested in sports journalism. As I was watching ESPN one day, Stephen A Smith stated, "What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" during a sports segment. What is the ...
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3answers
391 views

Term for things like “naughty step” where the step is not what is naughty

Can anyone remind me of the grammatical term for the apparent misapplication of an attributive adjective, as in the phrase "the naughty step" (where it is not the step itself that is naughty but the ...
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4answers
293 views

Special name for royal titles?

Is there a name for the title/nickname that some members of royalty get? For example, "King Larry the Kind".
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1answer
390 views

What do you call a statement like “How to perform a change of ownership” [closed]

What do you call a statement similar to the following? "How to perform a change of ownership" I wish to request user input by asking a question such as: "Please enter your title in the ...
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2answers
569 views

Is this the right meaning of this sentence? [closed]

I am trying to find an original way to say "Conquer the Justice". Looking on the dictionary, I found that "storm" not only means something like a tempest but also to "conquer with weapons". Supposing ...
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1answer
785 views

Word for the superclass of buttons, zippers, and pegs?

I’m looking for a word which describes all of buttons, zippers, and pegs — or any objects used to secure clothing, such as on the face of a t-shirt or jacket. I’ve considered using seal and ...
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3answers
115 views

Better term for “time-evolving charts”

I am working on charts to show every day climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation over a period of time. I used the term "time-evolving charts". Is there a better term to show the ...
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2answers
665 views

The relation between “temporal” and “time”

The word "temporal" is the XXX form of the word "time". What is XXX? I can't find the answer anywhere, I don't even know where to look.
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1answer
28k views

What does 'on-premises' mean?

Here is the example sentence. Windows Azure Caching was developed from an on-premises Caching solution that shipped with Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server. What does 'on-premises' ...
2
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2answers
399 views

When discussing non sequiturs, is a non sequitur made by a participant considered as a non sequitur? [closed]

Let's take this conversation: Alice: What is a non sequitur? Bob: A non sequitur is something said that, because of its apparent lack of meaning relative to what preceded it, seems absurd to ...
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3answers
330 views

What is the origin of the phrase “racing cert”?

I had encountered the phrase, “racing cert”, the other day, and I had to go look it up. The only definition I immediately found was one from UD: English colloquialism. Born from gambling talk and ...
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1answer
998 views

Term for words that sound alike but have different meanings and spellings [closed]

What is the term for words that sound alike but have different spellings and meanings? For example, there and their.
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2answers
262 views

Term for the identification of the person speaking in a dialogue

Consider the following piece of dialogue: Peter: Hello, Mary! How do you do? Mary: Hi, Peter! Fine, and you? What is the term for the part in bold, the specification of who is to speak a ...
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4answers
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What is the difference between a “prefix” and a “combining form”?

According to ODO, mini- is classified as a combining form. How exactly is this different from a prefix (or an affix, in general)? Can combining forms also be prefixes?
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5answers
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Is there a word for something that gets “acted upon”?

For instance, say I have two individuals and one is active, the other passive. I know I can call the active person the "actor"—he "acts upon" the passive person. But what do I call the "acted upon"? ...
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1answer
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Intonation and the changing of meaning

Two questions with the same words can have somewhat different meanings. For example, I could ask Do you want to go to the zoo or the museum? with my intonation/pitch rising after zoo, or Do ...
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5answers
712 views

What's the word for something that's too direct and plain rather than poetic?

When someone writes poetry that's almost like plain English sentences, what may we call that? Consider this, for example. This is an example of that plain, stated as it is, poetry (completely made ...
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1answer
254 views

Difference between “acquittal” and “false accusation” [closed]

I encountered a phrase with a word "acquittal" in a context of criminal law. In Wikipedia, its meaning is described as following: In the common law tradition, an acquittal formally certifies that ...
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1answer
105 views

deep roll of blue at the tops

I want some help with my question about the meaning of “deep roll of blue at the tops”: "The men were dressed in blue, of the same shade as their hats, and wore well-polished boots with a deep ...
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4answers
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Semantic or pragmatic ambiguity?

When one says "Do you want a cup of coffee?" he can mean: either an informative question — "Do you feel a desire to a cup of coffee?", or a polite offer — "I can make you a cup of coffee if you ...
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1answer
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Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
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Why is 'allopathy' not an accepted synonym for 'mainstream medicine'?

According to Wikipedia, Allopathic medicine and allopathy (from the Greek prefix ἄλλος, állos, "other", "different" + the suffix πάϑος, páthos, "suffering") are terms coined in the early 19th ...
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3answers
146 views

Synonyms for 'extra' (noun)

Recently I came across the word 'extra' in following meaning: "a person engaged temporarily to fill out a crowd scene in a film or play". I have a strong feeling that there should be some ...
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4answers
139 views

The centrality that does not need to be named

Suppose we are looking at Internet domain names. Every country has its own two-letter abbreviation (.fr, .uk, .ca, .za, etc.) — except for the US, as far as I know. They have .com, .org, .edu, ...
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2answers
153 views

Word request: section of a book dealing with odd miscellaneous topics

I vaguely remember that there's a term for a section of a book which deals in odd miscellaneous topics -- not exactly the same as "appendix". Any suggestions? The words I can think of are all dancing ...
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2answers
351 views

Is the word multimedia redundant?

So, the correct plural form of medium is media. Of course, there are exceptions, and the words have taken on new usages (such as adding a definitive article "the" to media, making it singular), but ...
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5answers
7k views

The insured vs. the assured

Consider the following statement (written in the context of marine cargo insurance): The insurers plead negligence on the part of the assured. The writer is British. Is the use of assured ...
7
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1answer
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Different types of whistling

Are there terms or succinct phrases that describe the different ways of whistling listed below? The standard put-your-lips-together-and-blow Tongue against bottom teeth Sticking two fingers (thumb ...
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1answer
144 views

What does “non-afirmated” artist mean? [closed]

I often hear this term "afirmated artists" or sometimes "non-afirmated artists", but I couldn't find meaning in the dictionary. What exactly could it be? See, for example, the International Festival ...
4
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2answers
942 views

You are standing into danger

On lists of nautical flag meanings (one and another), the letter U means you are standing into danger. I am familiar with the phrase from a sailing point of view - it means something like "if you keep ...
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5answers
1k views

What is the term for groups of numerals within a large number?

I am writing software in which I would like to be able to return the groups of numerals within a large number. For example, given a number 123,456,789, my software would return 123 then 456 then 789. ...
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3answers
551 views

Archaic vs Historical in dictionaries

At Oxford Dictionaries Online the word alderman is marked as "chiefly historical", whereas ere is marked as "literary or archaic". I've looked around on the ODO site, but I can't find a guide to ...
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2answers
451 views

Antecedents of indefinite pronouns

Consider the sentence, "Most of the apples are fresh." Is it incorrect to say that apples is the antecedent of the indefinite pronoun most?
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4answers
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What do you call the person who performs an action?

What do you call the person who does the verb? For instance, in the sentence John killed Frank what is the grammatical term for John? I don't know if "agent" is the right word?
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4answers
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'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
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3answers
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Term for a word that is unintentionally made up of two or more other words?

For example, therapist may be split into the + rapist, neither of which (arguably) has anything to do with the original words. Another example would be conflagration: con + flag + ration. Or ...
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3answers
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“He rolled his toilet things into his housewife”

From C.S. Forester's Hornblower and the Hotspur: [The naval captain] rolled his toilet things into his housewife and tied the tapes. ODO does provide a second definition for housewife which ...