Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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171 views

“Listen to them not”

One of my favorite movies is Hocus Pocus with Bette Midler. One of the lines in the movie is "Listen to them not!" Said by one of the townsfolk in the beginning when they were being hanged. Is this ...
4
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4answers
962 views

Term for people not in any way involved in a crime/incident

I'm looking for a word that refers to the people (general population) who were not involved in an incident. To be particular let's say the incident is a "crime". That is, one you take away the ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
6
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3answers
1k views

What do you call a number that is a power of 2?

I know there is a term for a number that is the power of 2, such as 8, 32, 128, 4096 -- but it slipped my mind.
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3answers
1k views

Is there a term for words that when reversed, form other words?

I'm aware of what a palindrome is. What do you call words that, when reversed, form other words, such as ton (not) and part (trap)?
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3answers
822 views

What's the opposite of nominal in the astronaut sense?

If some sub-system is not nominal, what do they say?
5
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2answers
552 views

What do you call a verb which accepts 2 nouns?

In English, there are intransitive verbs which can't used with a noun, or aren't being used with a noun (eg. listen, die, ...), and transitive verbs which can be (eg. almost all of them). However, ...
6
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5answers
56k views

Why use BCE/CE instead of BC/AD?

When I was a kid, I was always taught to refer to years using BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini / year of our Lord). However, I somewhat regularly hear people referring to years as in the CE ...
17
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4answers
1k views

What is the term for an integer one larger than a given integer?

I'm looking for a concise term to say a number must be exactly one higher than a previous number. None of "subsequent", "incremental", or "next" seem to convey the restriction that it must be ...
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3answers
952 views

Heraldry symbols description

I'm reading Game of Thrones, in English, and when some Heraldry shields are shown as the novel goes, I have some doubts about the meaning on some words. Or given the context some words don't mean what ...
12
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3answers
2k views

How did the word “lid” come to mean “poor operator” (in the context of telegraphy and amateur radio)?

This sense of lid is still common today in Amateur ("Ham") Radio (in the United States, at least), usually as "they're a lid", meaning "they're being a rude or unobservant person." It doesn't refer to ...
2
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3answers
170 views

Can 'area' be called 'plot'?

Can area from mathematics be called plot?
26
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2answers
2k views

What is the origin of “daemon” with regards to computing?

Daemon has an interesting usage in computing. From my local dictionary: a background process that handles requests for services such as print spooling and file transfers, and is dormant when not ...
0
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2answers
99 views

Is “taking him going away” a common fishing phrase?

Has anyone ever heard the phrase "taking him going away" used to describe the experience of hooking a fish ("him") while it is moving away from/in the opposite direction of the person fishing?
11
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6answers
1k views

Where does the term “Monad” come from?

I understand how monads work, and I use them on a routine basis. However, I've been wondering where the term actually comes from and what does it mean? Edit: To clarify, I'm specifically referring to ...
5
votes
4answers
213 views

Terminology for the levels user programs go through to access hardware

I'm looking for the terminology to describe the stack between user level programs and the hardware. For example, in a typical non-virtualized environment, this stack is: User program <-> ...
7
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4answers
425 views

General term for muggle-type terms?

Is there a general term to refer to "a semi-denigrating term used by a minority social group (not necessarily a racial group) to refer to the majority". Examples would be "muggle", "gentile", ...
0
votes
1answer
241 views

Please define the grammar errors (by their generally accepted terms) in this sentence

My goal in asking this question is to learn to name my errors. I write many sentences and think, "that's not right," and then I change it to make it sound better. It usually works well (and my boss ...
3
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1answer
24k views

This weekend vs Next weekend [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What day is next Tuesday? Imagine that it's Monday, the 1st. The weekend would be the 7th & 8th. How do you refer properly to the coming weekend, "This weekend" or ...
11
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1answer
563 views

What is a term for words that are both homophones and homographs?

While there are homophones like bear and bare, and homographs like sow, the pig, and to sow a seed, is there a term for words that cover both categories? The example that comes to mind for me is to ...
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5answers
287 views

Is it true that the plural of “chad” is “chadim”?

I was busy at filing tasks today, working the hole punch and manufacturing... er... more than one chad. I consulted the Computer Contradictionary by Stan Kelly-Bootle, which is normally a reliable ...
1
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1answer
915 views

What is the section before the commas called at the start of a sentence after words such as “well” or “however”

For example: Well, that was his answer anyways. Or However, the answer was wrong.
26
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1answer
2k views

What are these symbols called in the English language?

You see these all the time in movies, usually when some poor guy has been wrongly imprisoned and begins counting the days since his incarceration, but what are these markings called? I used to know, ...
2
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3answers
532 views

Name of lines drawn to indicate movement?

This is a bit of a cryptic one; I was wondering whether English has a word (or at least a phrase) to describe the lines typically drawn on a cartoon to indicate movement? A good example is the ...
3
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4answers
2k views

Why is it called 'renewable energy'?

There's a lot of buzz these days about 'renewable energy', and with Germany's recent decision to close down their nuclear plants by 2012, activists are talking about moving to completely 'renewable ...
8
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4answers
211 views

Is there a specific word for “jolted from naïveté”?

In the example quoted below, I used surprised with intended meaning "jolted from naïveté", but wasn't satisfied with it. Also, I wanted to avoid implying that discovering the mentioned fact made me ...
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2answers
2k views

What do you call words that look like a negation but are not?

I can be nonplussed (in fact that is practically the ground state of my existence), but not plussed. I can also be indifferent; but if you are different, that doesn't mean you care, either. What do ...
17
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8answers
5k views

What is a good, short, word to describe a software engineer?

What should I call a person who write software, computer programs ? I know he/she is a software engineer, can I call him/her as "Coder"?
3
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5answers
399 views

Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?

I hope this question isn't off-topic. I heard a madrigal with the following verse which bothers me somewhat, grammatically. Cruel, wilt thou persever? Peace to leave ever? Peace shalt thou have and ...
42
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4answers
969 views

Is there a term for referring to an organization by its city rather than by its name?

This happens specifically often in the technology press: There's no point trying to ascribe motives to what Redmond [instead of "Microsoft"] does. We'll see shortly if Cupertino [instead of ...
4
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4answers
314 views

What can I call the two possible directions on a line (as a category)?

In English, a vector is said to have two properties: a length and a direction. The possible directions correspond to half-lines out of the origin (so that, eg, up and down are different directions). ...
19
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6answers
8k views

What do you call those divisions of a book bigger than a paragraph but smaller than a chapter?

In printed books, or at least in novels, there are often major breaks within a chapter more important than paragraphs. Often they are separated by a greater amount of whitespace than paragraphs and ...
5
votes
5answers
8k views

Is incorrect capitalization considered a spelling error?

Is incorrect capitalization, such as the lowercase "i" in can [this is not the sic you're after] i [this sic] have an if statement within a dialog box code? considered a spelling mistake, or ...
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0answers
45 views

Unitasker words like “crossbones”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context? I don't think I've ever heard the word "crossbones" outside of the phrase ...
38
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5answers
12k views

What term can be used to describe Yoda's speech?

What is Yoda's speech called? Is there a particular name for it (such as "dangling...")?
18
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11answers
4k views

What is the correct word for “dependee”?

What is the correct word for "dependee"? In other words, what is the word for something that is depended upon? The relationship here is in the context of software engineering
2
votes
1answer
233 views

Term for 'baby-talk'

So many newly-weds have this practice of calling one another ridiculous but affectionate names i.e. honey-bunch, or 'bunny-boo' etc. Is there a single-word term for this practice?
7
votes
6answers
17k views

How does one correctly use “q.v.”?

Wikitionary mentions offhand that "q.v." is used to reference material, but the definition it gives is far too sparse for my taste. My question is, what does "q.v." stand for and when should one use ...
11
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3answers
12k views

What follows next in the sequence “unary, binary, ternary…”?

I looked on Oxford's online dictionary and was able to find the names identifying orders of a given degree: primary secondary tertiary quaternary quinary senary septenary octonary nonary denary -- ...
9
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2answers
16k views

What is the difference between a “stanza” and a “verse”, as applied to English literature?

What is the difference between 'stanza' and 'verse' in English Literature (Poetry)? I've read one of my classmate's essays and the word 'verse' cropped up - I thought that the word 'verse' was usually ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Is there a different grammatical term for “If I was” than for “If I were”?

Many people would say the correct form is "If I were rich ...". In modern colloquial English though most younger people would say "If I was rich ...". Prescriptivists might say the latter is "the ...
4
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3answers
586 views

Word or phrase that describes the biased perception of a group

Is there terminology for how a group is viewed by outsiders, as only radical members are the most visible? I believe such a term would exist within social sciences.
6
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2answers
524 views

Term to describe relationship between one and single, two and double, etc.?

Is there a specific term used to describe the relationship between the words: One and single, Two and double, Three and triple, Etc. I don't quite think that the term synonym fits here, and was ...
4
votes
2answers
712 views

How to categorize “grrrr”, “errhh”, “argh”,..?

What are these called in English? Are they same thing as "Gosh" or "Gee"? Maybe sounds of emotional changes?
7
votes
4answers
6k views

What's the difference between orthography and spelling?

The terms "spelling" and "orthography" seem to be largely synonymous. What is the difference really? Is it that "orthography" is a more formal or technical term and hence more well-defined? Or is it ...
3
votes
2answers
185 views

Is there a sequence following “ace” (as in “ace pilot”)?

If an expert pilot or covert operative or other specialized profession can be referred to as an "ace", is there a word that describes someone who is less experienced or lacks some of the expertise? Is ...
2
votes
3answers
67 views

The X is on vs the X is at? What would you describe this variation as?

"The Knight is on D1." and "The Knight is at D1." Semantically the sentences mean the same thing. They are describing the position of a knight on a chessboard. The document I am writing contains a ...
8
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2answers
339 views

Is there a word for the definition of an acronym?

I can describe "IMHO" as an acronym for "in my humble opinion." How can I describe the reverse processes of translating the acronym into the actual phrase? That is to say, if "IMHO" is the acronym, ...
3
votes
3answers
757 views

Thieves' words for their victims

What words might a thief (of any variety) use to describe the victims of his theft? Con artists in film often use "mark", for example. Is there other jargon specific to the con branch* of crime? How ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

Writing “the class of 2014” in a résumé?

Is “class of 2014” correct? Is “class of ’14” correct? Assuming the reader is aware of the context, is simply using “’14” correct?