Tagged Questions

Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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1answer
127 views

What does 'culture' mean in this sentence?

...which is often used when the physician does not (or cannot) perform a culture to determine the actual bacterium.
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1answer
786 views

Ways to say methods of doing things

I saw a lot of usage of machinery, mechanism, to be used with similar meaning as techniques, ways, methods,.... For example, my math teacher said the machinery in the proof of some theorem is not ...
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2answers
862 views

What does a dialogue consist of? I mean, what are these constituents called?

Tina: I had a strange dream last night. Jack: Well, dreams are always strange. I've never had an absolutely "normal" dream. So what did you dream about? Tina: I dreamed about a skyscraper ...
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4answers
3k views

Term for same root word but words with different meaning

Some words have the same etymology, root, but mean different things, such as mysterious and mystical. What are some other pairs (or more) that fall into this category, and what exactly is this ...
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2answers
6k views

What does 'corporeal form' mean?

These series, however, are only one particularly obvious example; throughout practically the whole of chemistry, even in the various nitrogen oxides and oxygen acids of phosphorus or sulfur, one ...
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1answer
2k views

What is a group of dragonflies?

As per title, what is the name of a group of dragonflies? Some friends say it is a mob, some say it is a hover. Anyone?
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2answers
104 views

In which context is “lignicolous” used?

Is lignicolous a word used in a specific context, or is it common to say "that is a lignicolous bug"?
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1answer
581 views

What adjective would best describe adjectives that are related to feelings?

Joyful, happy, angry, hilarious, lovable, annoying, poignant, melancholic, depressing, cheerful, hateful, etc. All these ones are adjectives. Some of them can be applied to those objects who ...
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2answers
1k views

Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries?

people from China = Chinese people from Japan = Japanese people from Australia = Australian people from Lebanon = Lebanese people from Sweden = Swedish Are there any rules that ...
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6answers
2k views

Example of sentence using “sang-froid”

In which context should sang-froid be used? Can you provide an example?
3
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1answer
652 views

What is the name of equipment that is used in films, like when saying “scene one, take two”?

What is the name of equipment that is used in films, like when saying "scene one, take two"? The equipment is usually black and white in color.
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9answers
910 views

What is this an example of: “FOR SALE: Car by elderly lady with new body and spare tire”

Historical examples: Croesus asked the oracle what would happen if he attacked Persia. The reply: ‘A mighty empire will be humbled’. Thank you so much for the book. I shall lose no time in ...
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3answers
3k views

“Trust” vs. “Cartel”

The establishment of trust is quite difficult but for cartel it is comparatively easy. What is the difference between trust and cartel? Does the word "oligopoly" have a different meaning in ...
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6answers
298 views

Term for increasing military presence at sea

What term expresses an increase of troops or other military units in a standoff between two armies, when no actual fighting has yet occurred? Specifically, I'm looking for something in the context of ...
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6answers
705 views

What is the term for neglectful spelling of words such as “you” as “u”?

The age of texting and instant messaging as we all know has created a phenomenon of using shorter versions of words to save on keystrokes. On tiny keypads or phone buttons this obviously can be a time ...
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5answers
3k views

Is it “a SSD” or “an SSD”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: an SQA or a SQA? Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Since SSD (solid-state drive) is pronounced es-es-dee, I'm wondering whether one ...
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2answers
262 views

A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties

I need a word to define a set which includes companies, NGOs and faculties that sounds equally distant to those 3. I am not a native English speaker so I might be wrong but "Corporation" sounds like ...
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2answers
950 views

How To Pronounce “IFRS”?

How to pronounce "IFRS," International Financial Reporting Standards? Anybody knows its phonetic symbols with IPA symbols?
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3answers
4k views

What do you call words that are separated by a hyphen?

What do you call words like one-note that are separated by a hyphen?
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4answers
639 views

Is there a term similar to “hypochondriac” except more externally based?

By "external" I mean a person who has a fear or worry of things that could cause serious illness, rather than the fear of already having a serious illness itself. For example, say you worry about ...
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3answers
463 views

Is there a term for French words adopted by the English language, such as “hors d'oeuvres” or “objet d'art”

I would call them "Frenchisms" or some such -ism, but I figured I'd at least ask first. So is there a name for such adopted foreign phrases? Also, how about those adopted from languages other than ...
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4answers
3k views

If prepend is not part of English, why is there no postpend or subpend? And who introduces them? [closed]

I wanted to ask it already for some time but was in doubt until I've read the comment by Stan Rogers to this answer: In the case of prepend, we have created an artificial term that is ...
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8answers
5k views

Origin of “let's take it offline”

When did people start using the corporate jargon "let's take it offline" (let's discuss that after this meeting in private)? According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the origin of online is from ...
2
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1answer
541 views

What does “ghetto login route” mean?

Marc Gravell recently provided this answer to a question on Meta Stack Overflow: If you try Jeff's link above, and everything reports OK but it still doesn't work, please let me know. In the ...
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3answers
272 views

Is there a specific name for a portmanteau of two alternative spellings?

This question came about in a discussion between myself and another user of the Gaming.SE chat after I linked in this chiptune track called An Eskimeau Experience Here is the gist of the discussion: ...
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3answers
7k views

What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?

What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing? Examples: building, scaffolding, ending. What are some other examples, and what do they all share in common semantically?
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3answers
2k views

Why is a transportation by road called a “Shipment” but a transportation by seaways called “Cargo”?

I was just reading an article concerning a product trade and transports between countries and came through these words that made me wonder about their differences.
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7answers
1k views

Is technical copywriting jargon or style?

I became confused by comments to my answer insisting that Technical writing is jargon using incorrect English words. I also looked through definitions of "prepend" in internet, all with inserted ...
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3answers
538 views

How to name something that has sub-categories

So I have this database of my categories. And every category can have sub-categories, except for the prime-level ones. In my database I designate a row that is pointing to the category which will ...
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2answers
2k views

What does the word “Rep.” mean?

What's meaning of the 'Rep.'?
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7answers
6k views

Why “line of business” applications?

In software, why do we talk about line-of-business applications (sometimes abbreviated to LOB)? Why not just business applications? So it's useful to distinguish between general software (like email ...
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1answer
3k views

What is a good convention for expressing different currencies?

Using a currency amount such as $1,000 in writing that has an international audience may be confusing (as may £1,000). This amount might represent US, Canadian, Australian or some other currency. I ...
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2answers
101 views

Question that needs a selection

What do you call a question that needs a selection? For example: Is an argument true until proven false or vice-versa?
5
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1answer
4k views

Where does “three line whip” come from?

In parliament a three line whip is said to be applied when a party seeks to ensure every MP turns up and votes the party line. But why the term "three line" whip? And is there such a thing as a one ...
6
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2answers
630 views

Etymology of “regression”

What is the etymology of "regression" as in finding the coefficients of polynomials?
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3answers
5k views

“I'm having” - an illness?

What is I'm having in grammar terms? Is it something near the present, the near future? As in I'm having a party tomorrow? Example (not about the near future), I'm having trouble coming up with a ...
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3answers
13k views

Is there a name for the final section of a letter?

When writing a letter it typically starts out "Dear..." and then has the content, then before you sign it you might have a formal or informal (depending on who you're writing to) sign off, for ...
6
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4answers
4k views

What is a one-person business called?

I'm wondering what is the term for the person, that is doing business on his/her own and has tax liability. It's different in each country, I'd like to know how they are called in USA and UK.
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1answer
489 views

What's the difference between 'attaining awareness' and 'understanding of sensory information'?

the word 'perception' has two meaning in wikipedia: perception is the process of attaining awareness or understanding of sensory information example 1: With microphones, cameras, ...
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4answers
1k views

What does “hit margin” mean?

This is used in an economic context: We don't monetize ourselves properly, so we don't hit margins.
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6answers
4k views

Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context?

Certain words you hear in English are only ever heard in a single context. For example, skirl is used to describe the sound a bagpipe makes. Etymonline generously says the word is "rarely" heard ...
3
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1answer
481 views

Pejorative terms for children or teenagers using the Internet

In Poland we have got many names for young children or teenagers using the Internet. For example we could see on the Internet that many have mangled the mother tongue and have been writing like this: ...
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3answers
4k views

Why “motherboard” is used to refer to main board of computer

Why is motherboard used to refer to the main board of a computer? What is the relationship with the word mother here?
4
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1answer
873 views

What are the differences among ‘Rules’, ‘Standing Rules’, and ‘Bylaw’?

Recently I was given a document titled Standing Rules of an English speaking club of a local community, which was written in English, and asked to study the contents. I wondered what difference ...
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6answers
18k views

Cell phone? Cell? Mobile phone? What's the “correct” term?

What's that type of phone called that you don't need a cable for and you can use everywhere in the world (provided there's coverage ;-))? And what differences are there between the regions? ...
5
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1answer
195 views

Is there a technical term for the degeneration or evolution of words?

Based on this question, I was curious if there is an actual term that describes how words' meanings change or become deprecated over time.
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5answers
3k views

“The splits” vs “a split”

All my life I knew it as "I can do a split", but recently it has come to my attention that many people refer to it as "the splits" which sounds absolutely dreadful to my ear because it defies all the ...
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2answers
339 views

Is there a term that means “oft-used misquotation”?

There are some quotations that people always seem to get wrong: Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well. [Real quote from Hamlet: "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio."] I have nothing to offer ...
5
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1answer
585 views

What's the term for flickering eye movement

If you're looking out of the window of a moving train and at things as they go by (rather than a single object that you're leaving behind), your eyes appear to be flickering. There's a specific term ...
3
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1answer
156 views

Is there a word for the “primary” verb in a clause?

In an answer to another question, I erroneously said: Each sentence sentence normally be one complete thought, with a noun and a verb. You should generally not have two verbs per sentence What I ...