Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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2
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3answers
229 views

Word for delimiters which are placed after each item? [closed]

The word "separator" can be used to describe delimiters which are placed between items. For instance, in this sequence: "abbbabbbabbbabbba" The 'b's separate the 'a's. I'm looking for a word ...
14
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4answers
113k views

Meaning of “reach out to somebody”

The dictionary explains this as: To show somebody that you are interested in them and/or want to help them The explanation indicates the subject of the sentence is the one that offers help, but ...
3
votes
3answers
588 views

Architectural term for inward-facing corners [closed]

A T has eight corners. Six of these point outwards and two (the armpit) corners face inwards. In reference to a building, what is the term to describe the inward corners? The closest I've come up ...
4
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2answers
691 views

Human body with “skin peeled off” or “without skin” [closed]

My art teacher used a word when describing a sculpture of a human without his skin (exposing muscle beneath). What was that word?
3
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6answers
3k views

Are camp followers prostitutes?

My own understanding of the term camp followers was that it was synonymous with prostitutes who followed armies around plying their trade. However, according to Wikipedia: Camp-follower is a term ...
-1
votes
1answer
297 views

What term describes the relationship between 'collectivism' and 'collectivisation'?

What is collectivism, in terms of grammar, of collectivisation? Put another way: Collectivism is the [which word?] of collectivisation? Another example word pair might be centralism and ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is a possessive noun a contraction?

I was told not to use contractions in an essay. My classmate wrote "the argument of Emily" but I preferred "Emily's argument". He disagreed and claimed "Emily's" is a contraction.
13
votes
10answers
2k views

What do you call something that is not first in a sequence?

Is there a word to describe something that is not the first element in a sequence, but can be in any other position? A synonym of "not first", in fact. This element is __ in this sequence.
2
votes
5answers
1k views

What's the meaning of boilerplate in programming?

I am not very clear about the word boilerplate when it comes to programming. How is it different to other similar terms such as template and prototype? I would appreciate some examples that clearly ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Generic foreign words with specific English meanings

There are many words in English that are borrowed from other languages, but acquire a much more specific meaning along the way. For example, salsa in Spanish simply means "sauce", and could be ...
5
votes
3answers
6k views

What are the differences among ‘Hurricane,’ ‘Super storm,’ and ‘Typhoon’?

In this morning’s (November 2nd) live-video report of New York Times, the caster asked a guest commentator if the tropical storm Sandy can be classified as a hurricane because there are many others ...
4
votes
1answer
313 views

Word for passing a vehicle going the other way

Is there another word besides "pass" that more accurately specifies the act of two vehicles going past each other in opposite directions, as opposed to overtaking a vehicle going the same direction? ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

“sample” vs “specimen” in a scientific document on condensed matter physics

I am searching for an appropriate headline in scientific document. The chapter is named "Investigated Specimen" at the moment. In the chapter I describe crystals that I have investigated. I feel that ...
4
votes
3answers
574 views

“Native” names and “western” names?

When Chinese, Koreans, and possibly other Asians migrate into countries like the UK or the US, they often take on a "western" or "anglicised" name for a number of reasons. For example, the director ...
-1
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2answers
87 views

Correct? “We make no prescriptions …”

Can I use "We make no prescriptions about ..."? This dictionary doesn't give any definition of the word "prescription" apart from Medical or Legal jargon.
0
votes
1answer
475 views

What is the opposite of an agent noun?

Is there a simple phrase to describe the object of an agent noun performing an action? The adviser helped the advisee. The employer fired the employee. Is there a phrase similar to "agent ...
4
votes
2answers
664 views

What are the names for geometric arrangements like 'quincunx'?

A quincunx is a geometric pattern consisting of five points arranged in a cross: This seems like a very specific name derived from the Latin root for five (quin). Are there other geometric ...
6
votes
4answers
291 views

Name for number format used in “Section 3.2.1”

Does that kind of numbering style have a common name or names? To be fair, it is really more of an "identifier" since it certainly not a scalar (one-dimensional) number. It isn't fair to call it a ...
11
votes
4answers
714 views

How much not better than average is enough?

This is adapted from a silly conversation I had about a baseball player. It set me wondering how to describe this sort of wordplay linguistically. HIM: Do we leave Jay in center? HER: He's ...
10
votes
2answers
705 views

When did British and American crochet terms diverge?

In crochet basic stitches are called different things. For example a single crochet in America is called a double crochet in the UK, a double crochet in America is called a treble crochet in the UK, ...
1
vote
1answer
145 views

Megafauna is to animals as what is to insects?

I'm aware of several species of "giant" insects, such as the Meganeura (giant dragonfly) and the Arthropleura (giant centipede) — but I was wondering if anyone knew of a loose term similar to ...
1
vote
2answers
547 views

Does one top up or top off rechargeable batteries?

While writing a forum post on proper lithium-ion battery care, I started wondering whether the proper term for recharging them while still fairly full is called topping up or topping off. Perhaps both ...
-3
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “run’n’gun” mean?

I found the term "run’n’gun" in an article about video games. What does it mean in that context?
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1answer
3k views

Is it derogatory to call user a punter?

I've been wondering whether it is somewhat derogatory to call a user a punter. For instance, We should encourage punters to participate in the discussions. Update: My apologies — I owe you an ...
6
votes
0answers
1k views

Term for homophones that have opposite meanings? [closed]

Is there a term for homophones that have opposite meanings to each other? For instance, Whole vs Hole Also, are there any more examples of such words?
21
votes
2answers
1k views

Whose tense is it, anyway?

I have questions which perhaps should be posted to Linguistics.SE; but since my primary concern is to discover what terminology in discussing English grammar and usage on ELU (and in similar ...
3
votes
3answers
236 views

Painting term for the reflective lighting of a surface?

In oil painting especially, I believe there is a technical word for the light that's reflected from one surface onto another (in the scene that's being painted). For example, if there's a ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

Antonyms and mutually exclusive words

If north is the antonym of south, then what is the relationship between north and all other non-north directions such as east, west, south, south-east, south-west, etc.? Similarly, if male is the ...
8
votes
3answers
10k views

Term for a person who can read but cannot write

I'm looking for a term to accurately describe a person who can only read but cannot write. While I'm primarily concerned with people who have never learned to write, I would also be interested in any ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

What is the category name of words that can take 2 objects? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What do you call a verb which accepts 2 nouns? The function f assigns each value of x a value of f(x). Please show me what you have done. I tell you the truth. What ...
1
vote
2answers
527 views

Is there a term for referencing the main character in a first-person song?

Is there a specific word for the protagonist when the singer sings from the protagonist's point of view? For example, in the song "Two Is Better Than One" by Boys Like Girls: I remember what you ...
2
votes
3answers
171 views

“The author is by Katherine Patterson” — what is the term for the error in this sentence?

I am marking some student work and one of the sentences was The author is by Katherine Patterson. What is the term for the error in this sentence?
0
votes
0answers
58 views

Are 'next Friday' and 'this Friday' the same? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to? To me, they both mean the same thing, the upcoming Friday, but I know people who say that 'next Friday' is the one ...
1
vote
2answers
440 views

Term for “a pattern that repeats once induced”

For example, let's say that I went to sleep one night at 5:00 am. Out of exhaustion, I would most likely sleep until the late afternoon. Since I woke up so late, I wouldn't be tired until very early ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What are questions like “why did the chicken cross the road” called?

What are questions like Why did the chicken cross the road? called? I want to know if there is a particular term given to these type of questions.
7
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the process called to change “fire” → “fiery”?

It's clearly not "conjugation", and I'm not even sure which keywords to use for google to help on this. Without having time to dedicate my next few days to read though linguistics textbooks, I thought ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

Hyphens in verb construction containing prefix such as “re”

In semi-formal business writing in the United States, I often observe that writers tend to add a hyphen between a prefix and the root infinitive of verbs. In many of the cases, the resulting verb ...
1
vote
5answers
1k views

Is there a term or short description for an accent you “can't place”?

Some examples of this might be Standard American English (though this may still be tied to geography) or, more likely, Received Pronunciation. The speaker's language doesn't have to be English, of ...
2
votes
1answer
290 views

What is the correct usage of a charged-off or charged off loan in the Financial space? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Does proper grammar dictate a preference towards using "charged-off" or "charged off" to describe a loan ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “revenue” and “income”? [closed]

It seems that revenue and income have the same meaning. However, they seem to be used differently. What is the difference between them? When should we use one and not the other?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Terminology for pairs of words with the same meaning, similar or same pronunciation but different spelling

Is there a term describe word pairs like colour/color that have the same meaning, similar or same pronunciation but a different spelling? The most common examples I can think of are English/American ...
7
votes
5answers
949 views

What are specific cartoon-type interjections like “cough” and “sigh” called in English?

In comics, for example those by Walt Disney, interjections that describe or emphasize in words what the characters in the image are doing are quite commonly used (cough, sigh, tweet). According to ...
10
votes
0answers
51k views

List of expertise levels from beginner to expert [closed]

I am looking for a list from beginner to expert in as much as possible steps. I have constructed by myself: Newbie Novice Rookie Beginner Talented Skilled Intermediate Skillful Seasoned Proficient ...
1
vote
1answer
285 views

Category of words — 'another', 'an additional', “an alternative”, etc

I'm afraid I've had a sudden lapse of memory and have forgotten what category these kinds of words belong to. These words are used to expand upon another point within the same category. For example: ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the word for nouns with gender-specific forms?

Thought I would try a question with visual aid.* The image below shows Claire Danes, "Actor", in a kiosk poster for the Met. The variation in usage between actor and actress for female thespians is ...
14
votes
3answers
706 views

What is it called when a letter is within another letter?

What is it called when a letter is within another letter? For example, the letter O within the letter L: Edit: Or the first C in the Coca-Cola logo: Does this arrangement of type have a name?
21
votes
2answers
720 views

Is there a name for this method of writing that includes pictograms?

I've seen people write (usually in a humorous way) a 'code-like' message where parts of words are replaced with a pictogram that sounds like that word-part. E.G.: (eyeball) (tin can)(rope knot) ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

“Paintings on walls and ceilings” and “painting of portraits, landscapes”

I am creating a portfolio of painter's works and I need to categorize them. There will be two global categories: Paintings on canvas Painting on walls and ceilings The paintings on canvas divide ...
4
votes
2answers
177 views

What's the correct way to imply that a course is not taken online?

I'd like to know how I should write on my CV that some courses I've taken were taken online (i.e. on websites, through videos and such) while others were actually taken on an institute/school etc. ...
8
votes
8answers
3k views

Term for easing up sails in a heavy storm

What is the correct verb (or phrase) to describe the action of reducing a boat's sail power in a heavy storm? So far, I've only come up with reefing the sails, but that refers to the furling of the ...