Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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1answer
60 views

What is the term for a phrase like “school it is”?

I heard this kind of expression in conversation: 1) A.- You should go to school and learn. B.- All right, school it is. 2) A.- Open the window unless there is better idea. B.- (no ...
-6
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1answer
62 views

New word “patrogony” [closed]

I have searched years, picking some very bright brains. So far, no one I know or can google has a satisfactory name for the sexual reversal of "misogyny*". I nominate either of two: 1. ...
4
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1answer
62 views

Term for dilemma regarding knowledge of information which cannot be used without alerting the other party

What is the term for a dilemma in which one has crucial information belonging to another party, who would be alerted if any sort of action were to be taken regarding this information? An example of ...
8
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10answers
597 views

Something that provides a way to gain knowledge

Is there a single word or a phrase for 'something that indicates a direction to pursue or gain knowledge'? I want to use this word for 'Symmetry'. I want to write about how symmetry helps us think ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Term for word used at end of sentence that can be combined with first word of next sentence [closed]

Example: You do not get a free pass. Words will be your downfall. Notice how the end of the sentence, pass, can be combined with the first word of the next sentence, words, to form: passwords. What ...
1
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2answers
68 views

'Functional [something]': using an object intended for one purpose in a nontraditional or unforeseen way [closed]

Many years ago someone used the term "functional _______" (the blank being a placeholder for the second word of the term, which I can't remember) to denote the skill of being able to envision using an ...
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0answers
24 views

“Tense” Equivalent Neutral Term for Singular / Plural Form?

Here's one for the English professors: I originally came across this problem when answering a question here. We all know that tense refers to the temporal form of a verb. "Act, acted, will act, has ...
4
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1answer
105 views

What kind of abbreviations are “Bee Gees”, “Eminem”, etc? [duplicate]

The "Bee Gees" is actually a stylised expansion of the initials BGs, which in turn refers to initials of Barry Gibb, DJ Bill Gates and Bill Goode (or simply means Brothers Gibb). "Eminem" comes from ...
2
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3answers
93 views

Hypernym for lossy or lossless? [closed]

Generally, there exist two types of compression algorithms which have the feature to be lossless or lossy. What is the noun to reference this feature? The word lossiness seems to be plausible to me. ...
5
votes
4answers
88 views

Verb to mean a place is getting to your head

I seem to remember the existence of a phrasal verb to mean that a place is getting to your head, i.e. the place is starting to influence your choices and/or changing your persona. I though "it grows ...
0
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3answers
155 views

Is the term “tooltip” for the upvote and downvote button on StackExchange accurate?

It just occurred to me that the term tooltip used for SE's upvote and downvote button might be ambiguous and misleading. Doesn't tip here mean advice? Whenever I hover my mouse over an icon in Word ...
1
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0answers
21 views

What is a noun derivative from a verb when being used in an assignment context?

I'm trying to find a noun that can only be derived only from a verb and is assigned as a role. E.g. in the following sentence: Fred assesses the test. Jack runs over the hill. Billy ...
2
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1answer
47 views

What is the correct way to deal with a quantity of gravity in science fiction?

I'm trying to edit someone's sci-fi novel, and I'm running into a need to refer to levels of gravity in a space station and on other planets in terms of Earth gravity. I cannot find a correct standard ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

How do you categorize groups of people as subjects?

When compiling published content, one method of sorting or filtering is by audience. There, the term “audience” generally implies a curation of material for assumed identities of a readership ...
0
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2answers
50 views

“Cross-posting” - is this word able to be used literally nowadays?

"Cross-posting" is the act of asking a question of more than one site within a system. As far as I know, it has always had a poor reputation, because doing so encourages answers that are not seen ...
3
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1answer
47 views

Is there a term for the point in time when a product can begin to use itself?

I know there is the term "dogfooding" and have even found other variations on the phrase "... eat our own dog food": "drinking our own champaign" "eating our own cooking" "ice cream our customers ...
4
votes
1answer
53 views

What's the meaning of 'Min' in The Old Curiosity Shop?

In Dickens' The Old Curiosity Shop, the word 'min' is used. For example: "is the old min friendly?" As it is only used by one character, Mr Swiveller, one can assume it to be slang and expect it to ...
0
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4answers
72 views

Word or phrase for someone who talks with another person, but obviously looking around for someone more interesting

Word or phrase for someone who talks with another person, but obviously looking around for someone more interesting. Like at a party, where my interlocutor is noticeably scanning the room for more ...
0
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1answer
48 views

what does “showing the fly the way out of the fly-bottle” literally means?

I saw this expression: "the aim of the activity is "to show the fly the way out of the fly-bottle". " (It is connected with this other expression: "I don't know my way about".) I grasped the ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

What does “go on floors” really mean?

When reading movie magazines or news I come across lines like the below: Mr. A's new film goes on floors next month. The actors 2 movies are going on floors later this year. One can ...
34
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6answers
4k views

Is there a pre-Internet term for “gamification”?

Gamification is a relatively new term which was coined and has been made highly popular in the Internet era. From the related Wikipedia article: Though the term "gamification" was coined in 2002 ...
4
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1answer
34 views

Is there a proper name for an exchange trophy?

Institutions often hand out awards that include trophies that are either to be returned after the ceremony, or after one year when a new candidate is awarded the same trophy and their name is engraved ...
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1answer
40 views

Need a word for someone not acknowledging what you are saying, and who attempts to put you in a bad light [closed]

Word for: when a person you are dealing with does not acknowledge what you are saying but rather, goes on the attack and attempts to present you in a bad light, such as diversionary tactics
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0answers
71 views

Word or phrase to describe increasing periods between attempting the same operation

I'm looking for a term (single word or phrase) that describes the trick in software development to (typically exponentially) increase time between successive attempts to do an action on a server, for ...
1
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1answer
92 views

Is it now standard to refer to February 29th as a “bissextile day”?

I've noticed the obscure word "bissextile" showing up with greater frequency, especially in the past few leap years. In the past, the word would occasionally show up to refer to leap years as ...
5
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2answers
75 views

Meaningless/Placeholder Verb?

In some fields of study, there are various placeholder nouns/proper nouns---basically nouns that are conventionally used in an example but are understood not to correspond to an actual object. In ...
0
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1answer
36 views

How to explain the action of putting a table calendar facedown from an upright position?

I am unable to come up with the words to explain this action. To turn it the other away would still mean it is in an upright position. Put it down does not sound right either. Please help.
4
votes
6answers
262 views

In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun?

I thought I'd post this as it illustrates a problem often encountered on ELU. In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun? I've seen ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Name for person who uses epanorthosis

How would you from the noun epanorthosis derive a name describing a person who frequently uses this rhetorical tactic? An epanorthocian? Eparnorcian? Epanorthologist? Epanorthic? Something else? The ...
3
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2answers
148 views

Is “each and everyone” redundant? [closed]

Is saying "each and everyone" redundant? Also, what is the difference between "each and everyone" and "each and every one"? Thanks
20
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13answers
3k views

Is there a term for “likes” and “dislikes” on a social network?

What is the term to use for "likes" and "dislikes" on social networks? Are they marks or grades or rates or anything else? My purpose is that I'm programming a system where I have a Post domain ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Term for appending “-esque” or “-ish” to a a word to form an adjective

What is the name of the term for when someone transforms a noun into an adjective by appending -esque or -ish to the end of the noun? I see this in cases where an appropriate adjective doesn't readily ...
4
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2answers
143 views

Is it correct to use “git” as verb?

I know that the word git is used for describing an unpleasant person. Also Git is a name of a version control system which is quite popular among software developers. I thought this word did not ...
15
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14answers
2k views

What is the correct term for 'misleading' investigations?

I am looking for the more common and correct term used when someone tries to misdirect investigations on a crime that has been committed . For example, a murderer who tries to create false ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

“lmfaoooooooo”, “nooooooo” and other elongated words [closed]

Is there are phrase for elongating a word based off a less formal way of speaking (or would speak for colloquialisms like lmfao)? examples: noooooooo -> no yeaaaaaahhhh -> yeah loooooool ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Those damned “Screws” in the “Das Boot” [closed]

In the emergency dive scene one seaman is carrying a box with eggs which also has the convenient inscription "Vorsicht Eier!" (Careful, eggs !). On 0:14/0:15 he says on German: "Wahrschau ! Eier !" ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Employee “Registration Number” [closed]

I need to know what is the proper way to name the registration number of an employee within a company or firm to uniquely identify her/him. In my country (Italy) we we make large use of it. Thanks. ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

“Real estate” or “property” in my particular case?

I am launching a service for adding and viewing classifieds of houses, land (plot) and commercial real estate. Must it be described as "Real Estate Listings Platform" or "Property Listings Platform"? ...
5
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3answers
889 views

Why do Americans still call Native Americans “Indians”? [closed]

Why do some Americans still call the indigenous people of the Americas "Indians" when they now know that they're not from India?
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Term to describe such conversational phrases [closed]

Is there a term to describe colloquial, chatty phrases such as: Weird, I know. Who knew there was a place called Pikachu. You may be wondering... I'm doing a written assignment and I have to ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

Argumentation fallacies: Impossible to prove the non-existing [closed]

"It is impossible to prove that something does not exist, it is only possible to prove that sth does exist." - Is there an english term or does there exist a known argumentation fallacy to describe ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

What would be a good antonym for the term “reflective equilibrium”?

The term reflective equilibrium refers to, very simply put, when there's a balance between one's intuition and one's theories about the world. Personally, I tend to strive for the opposite, an ...
12
votes
2answers
150 views

What did English use before “triangle”?

Apparently the word "triangle" was borrowed into English in the late 1300s. Triangles are a very common shape in everyday life, and there were certainly English-speaking craftsmen and artists before ...
1
vote
3answers
71 views

Is there a word that means “to rotate into the correct position”?

Say you have a rocket in the incorrect orientation, and it moves into the correct orientation, what is a word instead of moves that describes what the rocket did?
3
votes
2answers
106 views

Is there a term for the use of adjectives as nouns?

I wonder when this horrible trend started—to me it seems to have proliferated very recently, over the last year or two: Give the gift of happy this Christmas ..or how about this, from the ...
33
votes
5answers
682 views

Is there a word for “a person from another race”?

I am searching for a word that means ‘of another race’ to be used in context of a sentence such as "She was deeply protective to her [of other race] foster children." "They shunned the ...
0
votes
1answer
148 views

What do you call a murderer who burns their victims alive?

I promise this isn't as weird as it sounds. I've tried a bit of Googling but I can't find anything that works well. I'm looking for a single word for a pyromaniac that burns people alive. The ...
3
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2answers
71 views

Is there a term for someone who barely moves their arms whilst walking?

I know someone who barely moves his arms when he walks, a bit like Frankenstein's monster. There is a Seinfeld episode ("The Summer of George") in which someone with the same behaviour is made fun of ...
2
votes
5answers
269 views

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...
5
votes
1answer
60 views

Best or technical term for the act of including a *purposeful gaff* in writing?

Although I suspect there are applicable examples in literature and newsprint, the specific context here is the online practice of either including a dud, or excluding an obvious/needed example in a ...