Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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1answer
395 views

What is a term for words that are both homophones and homographs?

While there are homophones like bear and bare, and homographs like sow, the pig, and to sow a seed, is there a term for words that cover both categories? The example that comes to mind for me is to ...
0
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1answer
544 views

What is the section before the commas called at the start of a sentence after words such as “well” or “however”

For example: Well, that was his answer anyways. Or However, the answer was wrong.
25
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1answer
1k views

What are these symbols called in the English language?

You see these all the time in movies, usually when some poor guy has been wrongly imprisoned and begins counting the days since his incarceration, but what are these markings called? I used to know, ...
2
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3answers
352 views

Name of lines drawn to indicate movement?

This is a bit of a cryptic one; I was wondering whether English has a word (or at least a phrase) to describe the lines typically drawn on a cartoon to indicate movement? A good example is the ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is it called 'renewable energy'?

There's a lot of buzz these days about 'renewable energy', and with Germany's recent decision to close down their nuclear plants by 2012, activists are talking about moving to completely 'renewable ...
8
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4answers
207 views

Is there a specific word for “jolted from naïveté”?

In the example quoted below, I used surprised with intended meaning "jolted from naïveté", but wasn't satisfied with it. Also, I wanted to avoid implying that discovering the mentioned fact made me ...
16
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2answers
2k views

What do you call words that look like a negation but are not?

I can be nonplussed (in fact that is practically the ground state of my existence), but not plussed. I can also be indifferent; but if you are different, that doesn't mean you care, either. What do ...
17
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8answers
4k views

What is a good, short, word to describe a software engineer?

What should I call a person who write software, computer programs ? I know he/she is a software engineer, can I call him/her as "Coder"?
3
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4answers
325 views

Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?

I hope this question isn't off-topic. I heard a madrigal with the following verse which bothers me somewhat, grammatically. Cruel, wilt thou persever? Peace to leave ever? Peace shalt thou have and ...
43
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4answers
908 views

Is there a term for referring to an organization by its city rather than by its name?

This happens specifically often in the technology press: There's no point trying to ascribe motives to what Redmond [instead of "Microsoft"] does. We'll see shortly if Cupertino [instead of ...
19
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6answers
6k views

What do you call those divisions of a book bigger than a paragraph but smaller than a chapter?

In printed books, or at least in novels, there are often major breaks within a chapter more important than paragraphs. Often they are separated by a greater amount of whitespace than paragraphs and ...
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5answers
6k views

Is incorrect capitalization considered a spelling error?

Is incorrect capitalization, such as the lowercase "i" in can [this is not the sic you're after] i [this sic] have an if statement within a dialog box code? considered a spelling mistake, or ...
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0answers
43 views

Unitasker words like “crossbones”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a term for words that have a single meaning or are only used in a single context? I don't think I've ever heard the word "crossbones" outside of the phrase ...
35
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5answers
7k views

What term can be used to describe Yoda's speech?

What is Yoda's speech called? Is there a particular name for it (such as "dangling...")?
2
votes
1answer
175 views

Term for 'baby-talk'

So many newly-weds have this practice of calling one another ridiculous but affectionate names i.e. honey-bunch, or 'bunny-boo' etc. Is there a single-word term for this practice?
4
votes
5answers
11k views

How does one correctly use “q.v.”?

Wikitionary mentions offhand that "q.v." is used to reference material, but the definition it gives is far too sparse for my taste. My question is, what does "q.v." stand for and when should one use ...
7
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3answers
8k views

What follows next in the sequence “unary, binary, ternary…”?

I looked on Oxford's online dictionary and was able to find the names identifying orders of a given degree: primary secondary tertiary quaternary quinary senary septenary octonary nonary denary -- ...
9
votes
2answers
8k views

What is the difference between a “stanza” and a “verse”, as applied to English literature?

What is the difference between 'stanza' and 'verse' in English Literature (Poetry)? I've read one of my classmate's essays and the word 'verse' cropped up - I thought that the word 'verse' was usually ...
4
votes
3answers
838 views

Is there a different grammatical term for “If I was” than for “If I were”?

Many people would say the correct form is "If I were rich ...". In modern colloquial English though most younger people would say "If I was rich ...". Prescriptivists might say the latter is "the ...
4
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3answers
450 views

Word or phrase that describes the biased perception of a group

Is there terminology for how a group is viewed by outsiders, as only radical members are the most visible? I believe such a term would exist within social sciences.
6
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2answers
483 views

Term to describe relationship between one and single, two and double, etc.?

Is there a specific term used to describe the relationship between the words: One and single, Two and double, Three and triple, Etc. I don't quite think that the term synonym fits here, and was ...
4
votes
2answers
566 views

How to categorize “grrrr”, “errhh”, “argh”,..?

What are these called in English? Are they same thing as "Gosh" or "Gee"? Maybe sounds of emotional changes?
7
votes
4answers
4k views

What's the difference between orthography and spelling?

The terms "spelling" and "orthography" seem to be largely synonymous. What is the difference really? Is it that "orthography" is a more formal or technical term and hence more well-defined? Or is it ...
3
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2answers
173 views

Is there a sequence following “ace” (as in “ace pilot”)?

If an expert pilot or covert operative or other specialized profession can be referred to as an "ace", is there a word that describes someone who is less experienced or lacks some of the expertise? Is ...
2
votes
3answers
59 views

The X is on vs the X is at? What would you describe this variation as?

"The Knight is on D1." and "The Knight is at D1." Semantically the sentences mean the same thing. They are describing the position of a knight on a chessboard. The document I am writing contains a ...
8
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2answers
295 views

Is there a word for the definition of an acronym?

I can describe "IMHO" as an acronym for "in my humble opinion." How can I describe the reverse processes of translating the acronym into the actual phrase? That is to say, if "IMHO" is the acronym, ...
3
votes
3answers
632 views

Thieves' words for their victims

What words might a thief (of any variety) use to describe the victims of his theft? Con artists in film often use "mark", for example. Is there other jargon specific to the con branch* of crime? How ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Writing “the class of 2014” in a résumé?

Is “class of 2014” correct? Is “class of ’14” correct? Assuming the reader is aware of the context, is simply using “’14” correct?
6
votes
4answers
3k views

How long is a 'wink'?

If I'm off to catch forty winks, how long will I be asleep? I'm interested to know if there is a specific amount of time associated with a 'wink', or if there's no actual amount of time behind it?
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the defiant “HMPH!” sound called?

What's the name of the sound a child makes after an angry, declarative and usually defiant statement. Parent: John, you can't take a cookie out of the cookie jar. Child: Yes, I can! HMPH!
8
votes
2answers
622 views

What are the proper terms for these star shapes?

Both figures are star pentagrams. But as you can see, the shapes are different due to the degree in the angles. Are there proper terms for these two shapes? I find myself having a hard time ...
11
votes
4answers
4k views

Origins of the gaming term “cheese strategy”

In a gaming scene the word cheese is used to describe strategies or ways of playing that are really powerful and do not require much skill from the players side at the same time. The term is widely ...
0
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1answer
143 views

etymology of “positive economics”

Positive economics, that is, value-free theory, is contrasted with normative economics which is value-laden. What is the etymology of positive economics?
2
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1answer
721 views

What are the degrees of synonymity?

In several questions and answers on this site I've read phrases that suggest there can be a scale of synonymity between words—something I haven't thought much about before. Some examples I've seen are ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Is the conditional a mood or a tense?

Is the conditional a mood or a tense? I've heard it described in both ways. It seems more like a mood as it is often lumped with hypothetical constructions and the subjunctive mood. I could see it ...
4
votes
3answers
913 views

What's the difference between colloquial and oral English?

What is the difference between colloquial an oral in the phrases, colloquial English and oral English?
15
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4answers
9k views

Why is the term “depressed” often used to describe a button which is pressed?

In several books that mention GUI, keyboard, or mouse buttons (e.g. the book Programming Windows by Charles Petzold), the authors refer to the state of a pressed button as depressed. Why is this term ...
1
vote
2answers
398 views

What is the term for starting an essay with a story or anecdote to pique the reader's attention?

I am looking for the formal academic term for this - not "opener" or "opening." I want to refer to it in a presentation about creating hooks to pull in the reader. I once knew the term but cannot ...
7
votes
6answers
9k views

Why do they say “love fifteen,” in tennis?

Why do they say "love fifteen," in tennis?
1
vote
1answer
3k views

What's the meaning of “on notice” and “under advisement”?

Can someone please give a clear definition and distinction of these terms, as when a public figure is asked a difficult question and says: "I'll take that on notice" or "I'll take that under ...
5
votes
4answers
898 views

Garbage/stuff words

I've watched two interviews. One with Grace Park, one with Eliza Dushku. What one can't miss is that Eliza uses an awful lot of garbage words (or how is it called) — um, so, like, you know, ...
4
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6answers
719 views

How to name a part of a piechart

Which term best suits to describe a part/slice/share/portion of a piechart, disregarding what the chart is about ?
4
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2answers
29k views

What do first, second, and third person perspective mean? Why are they so called?

I am aware of the terms first person, second person and third person from grammar, but I have also seen them used in other contexts, in particular first person perspective with regard to video games. ...
11
votes
3answers
810 views

Inhabitants of Vatican City would be referred to as ____

Keep that blank clean. No religious flaming. What I mean is this: inhabitants of America are Americans, inhabitants of Ohio are Ohioans, and inhabitants of Cincinnati are Cincinnatians. But what ...
2
votes
2answers
486 views

Use of the term “maths” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Math” or “Maths”? As far as I know, the term "math" is a clipped form of the word mathematics. In other words, it's already plural. So is ...
0
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3answers
204 views

What is the exact term for resolving all sub-domains (*.stackexchange.com) to www.stackexchange.com

The related question is asked here, and I cannot figure out it.
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Use of the word “aforementioned”

Is it correct to use the word aforementioned in an open-ended chatting context in which the conversation backtracks, such that the item that was mentioned before (as in, earlier in time) in the ...
2
votes
5answers
691 views

How might I name the items of a Likert scale?

I'm using a Likert scale that has 5 possible items: ++ for "I strongly agree" + for "I agree" +/- for "I'm indifferent" - for "I disagree" -- for "I strongly disagree" Now I think that "I'm ...
2
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2answers
407 views

How are certain technical words used in British English?

I have noticed that many terms in software come from American English, as the US was responsible for much software engineering terminology. I want to know how Britishers use these terms in these ...
3
votes
3answers
813 views

How are relative familial titles used for members who died prior to your birth?

This may seem an odd and morbid question, but I am curious about the use of relative familial titles when the family member you are referring to died prior to your birth. For example, say my mother ...