Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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264 views

cocktail knowledge

Some years ago in a computer science department I heard the term “cocktail knowledge” to refer to the knowledge that someone has on a subject when they can name techniques, results, and people but ...
1
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1answer
37 views

A term for non-player targetted information

I'm looking for a term that would describe the information that is not supposed to be known by players, not essential for their gaming experience. Like a game object (or feature) that isn't actually ...
4
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2answers
168 views

Is there a term for a married couple who have the same christian and surname?

My wife and I share the abbreviated form of our name - Alex derived from Alexandra and Alexander respectively. As we are married, we have the same christian and surname when used in the short form. ...
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3answers
418 views

Is there a word or phrase for language and culture combined?

Mr. Doe is committed to learning and teaching language and culture. Is there a term that embodies both language and culture? I want something concise, as I need to state it multiple times. I ...
0
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1answer
95 views

Term for “sum of durations”

While writing to a friend, I attempted to ask which web browser they used most. In the end, I asked which browser they used “more frequently”, but this was not the true object of my curiosity. By ...
4
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2answers
194 views

Term for asking a question to create context

Sometimes to start a conversation or to bring up a subject I ask a question. I ask it in hopes that they know the answer, I'm not seeking knowledge or an explanation, but instead I'm looking to create ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Word for a pane showing fictional characters in columns [closed]

In the manga/anime world you sometimes come across panes that show some of the characters of a certain manga or anime series arranged into columns. Here are some examples: Bleach Gotei 13 Bleach ...
2
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1answer
118 views

“nones” used to describe people who are spiritual, but not religious

I work for the Church and I've seen the term "nones" used to describe those who are non-Christian or those who are considered "spiritual, but not religious." I find the term belittling. What's the ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the term for a shortened word that is pronounced based on phantom letters?

I'm only posting out of curiosity. But recently I've begun to wonder what you would call a shortening of a word that only sounds correct when spoken, and the pronunciation cannot be inferred from its ...
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1answer
133 views

“Subpage” vs “sub page” vs is it even a word?

I would go with subpage, but the corrector on stackexchange thinks it's a mistake and shows a red underline. You can try it yourself. Click on "Ask Question" link and type subpage in a sentence to the ...
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1answer
218 views

"Science journal” vs. “science magazine”

What is the difference between the terms journal and magazine? Is it correct to call a magazine a journal? For example, I found the Journal of Radio Electronics and the Radio-Electronics Magazine, ...
4
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4answers
2k views

What is the origin of the word “whitewash” in the context of sports?

The term whitewash is used in sports to describe a situation where the opponents are beaten in a series of matches failing to register a single win. Merriam-Webster defines it as :- to hold (an ...
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2answers
106 views

Symmetric term for engaging with someone over SMS or Email

I want to make a natural language question answering that can answer when did I speak with Raj when did I Talk to Raj This term speak is symmetrical, it is not implied who initiated the call; ...
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2answers
202 views

What is the word for a pair of bytes?

Bit is a portmanteau of binary digit. A byte is 8 bits. A nibble is 4 bits (half a byte). Is there a word for a pair of bytes?
2
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1answer
2k views

dividend/divisor vs. numerator/denominator [closed]

From Wikipedia: In the expression a ÷ b = c, a is called the dividend or numerator, b the divisor or denominator and the result c is called the quotient. What's most common (in the context of ...
3
votes
1answer
137 views

What is the plural of tablix?

Don't know why the word table wasn't good enough for Microsoft, but SQL Server Reporting Services has a control called a tablix.... But how would I tell you that I have multiple tablix controls? (I ...
0
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0answers
41 views

What do you call a female that cannot stand other females? [duplicate]

I am looking for a word for a female that cannot easily get along with other females and who prefers not to be around them.
4
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2answers
316 views

Hypernym for “conjunction” and “disjunction”

Is there a hypernym for conjunction and disjunction, in their logical senses? Just using "junction" doesn't seem right to me.
1
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5answers
206 views

What is the name given to organisation that hosts other organisations?

There are many businesses that hosts other related or unrelated business as part of their service. Example a plaza/shopping mall will have various stores, owned and operated by others, a university ...
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1answer
490 views

Is there a name for the game where you can ask a question only after answering one?

In Roger Zelazny’s Blood of Amber, Merlin and Vinta Bayle are playing the mutual interview game, in which one gains a right to ask an opponent a question by first answering the opponent's question. ...
5
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3answers
863 views

What would be the proper abbreviation for an event that has yet occur?

I am looking for an abbreviation for an event that is expected to occur in the future, but has yet to occur. Similar to TBD for to be determined and TBA for to be announced. My events are a series ...
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2answers
565 views

“Release”, “free”, or “delete allocated memory”?

release the allocated memory. free the allocated memory. delete the allocated memory. What are the differences between them?
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1answer
2k views

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around?

What's it called when you switch the order of two words around, completely changing their meaning? For example, simply childish becomes childishly simple. Or wonderfully sarcastic becomes ...
5
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4answers
177 views

Term for “Free to play” Videogame that Isn't Free

What is a term for a videogame that, while labeled "Free to Play", is impossible (or extremely slow/tedious) to progress in without spending money on in-game content? Edit: Freemium is a decent ...
3
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2answers
287 views

Is there a term for “distinguishing between different concepts through the use of different, though synonymous, words”?

Background: A friend mentioned that he wanted to organise a board gaming tournament with 21 players. He opined that there ought to be a way to schedule seven 3-player games so that each player plays ...
3
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1answer
183 views

Does English possess a term for the study of all aspects of language in primary/secondary schools

Does academic English employ a concise/idiomatic term corresponding to the Russian term словесные дисциплины (literally, "verbal subjects")? The Russian term is from 19th century academic circles ...
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4answers
282 views

Is there a name for the words used after dialogue?

For example, "he said" "she replied" "they inquired."
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1answer
2k views

“What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?”

I am interested in sports journalism. As I was watching ESPN one day, Stephen A Smith stated, "What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" during a sports segment. What is the ...
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2answers
326 views

Term for things like “naughty step” where the step is not what is naughty

Can anyone remind me of the grammatical term for the apparent misapplication of an attributive adjective, as in the phrase "the naughty step" (where it is not the step itself that is naughty but the ...
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4answers
204 views

Special name for royal titles?

Is there a name for the title/nickname that some members of royalty get? For example, "King Larry the Kind".
1
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1answer
299 views

What do you call a statement like “How to perform a change of ownership” [closed]

What do you call a statement similar to the following? "How to perform a change of ownership" I wish to request user input by asking a question such as: "Please enter your title in the ...
1
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2answers
528 views

Is this the right meaning of this sentence? [closed]

I am trying to find an original way to say "Conquer the Justice". Looking on the dictionary, I found that "storm" not only means something like a tempest but also to "conquer with weapons". Supposing ...
3
votes
1answer
420 views

Word for the superclass of buttons, zippers, and pegs?

I’m looking for a word which describes all of buttons, zippers, and pegs — or any objects used to secure clothing, such as on the face of a t-shirt or jacket. I’ve considered using seal and ...
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3answers
103 views

Better term for “time-evolving charts”

I am working on charts to show every day climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation over a period of time. I used the term "time-evolving charts". Is there a better term to show the ...
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2answers
432 views

The relation between “temporal” and “time”

The word "temporal" is the XXX form of the word "time". What is XXX? I can't find the answer anywhere, I don't even know where to look.
3
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1answer
15k views

What does 'on-premises' mean?

Here is the example sentence. Windows Azure Caching was developed from an on-premises Caching solution that shipped with Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server. What does 'on-premises' ...
2
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2answers
296 views

When discussing non sequiturs, is a non sequitur made by a participant considered as a non sequitur? [closed]

Let's take this conversation: Alice: What is a non sequitur? Bob: A non sequitur is something said that, because of its apparent lack of meaning relative to what preceded it, seems absurd to ...
2
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3answers
210 views

What is the origin of the phrase “racing cert”?

I had encountered the phrase, “racing cert”, the other day, and I had to go look it up. The only definition I immediately found was one from UD: English colloquialism. Born from gambling talk and ...
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1answer
698 views

Term for words that sound alike but have different meanings and spellings [closed]

What is the term for words that sound alike but have different spellings and meanings? For example, there and their.
1
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2answers
198 views

Term for the identification of the person speaking in a dialogue

Consider the following piece of dialogue: Peter: Hello, Mary! How do you do? Mary: Hi, Peter! Fine, and you? What is the term for the part in bold, the specification of who is to speak a ...
4
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between a “prefix” and a “combining form”?

According to ODO, mini- is classified as a combining form. How exactly is this different from a prefix (or an affix, in general)? Can combining forms also be prefixes?
3
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5answers
639 views

Is there a word for something that gets “acted upon”?

For instance, say I have two individuals and one is active, the other passive. I know I can call the active person the "actor"—he "acts upon" the passive person. But what do I call the "acted upon"? ...
5
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1answer
844 views

Intonation and the changing of meaning

Two questions with the same words can have somewhat different meanings. For example, I could ask Do you want to go to the zoo or the museum? with my intonation/pitch rising after zoo, or Do ...
2
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5answers
504 views

What's the word for something that's too direct and plain rather than poetic?

When someone writes poetry that's almost like plain English sentences, what may we call that? Consider this, for example. This is an example of that plain, stated as it is, poetry (completely made ...
0
votes
1answer
178 views

Difference between “acquittal” and “false accusation” [closed]

I encountered a phrase with a word "acquittal" in a context of criminal law. In Wikipedia, its meaning is described as following: In the common law tradition, an acquittal formally certifies that ...
1
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1answer
74 views

deep roll of blue at the tops

I want some help with my question about the meaning of “deep roll of blue at the tops”: "The men were dressed in blue, of the same shade as their hats, and wore well-polished boots with a deep ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Semantic or pragmatic ambiguity?

When one says "Do you want a cup of coffee?" he can mean: either an informative question — "Do you feel a desire to a cup of coffee?", or a polite offer — "I can make you a cup of coffee if you ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is there a name for misusing a word (e.g., saying “Provincially, yes”)? [closed]

I read a mail in which someone replied to the question "Will he be attending the party?" by saying "Provincially, yes". Provincial means "of or concerning the regions outside the capital city of a ...
6
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1answer
679 views

Why is 'allopathy' not an accepted synonym for 'mainstream medicine'?

According to Wikipedia, Allopathic medicine and allopathy (from the Greek prefix ἄλλος, állos, "other", "different" + the suffix πάϑος, páthos, "suffering") are terms coined in the early 19th ...
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3answers
119 views

Synonyms for 'extra' (noun)

Recently I came across the word 'extra' in following meaning: "a person engaged temporarily to fill out a crowd scene in a film or play". I have a strong feeling that there should be some ...