2
votes
2answers
77 views

What is the word for “technical usurpation of an old word”?

Is there a word for "usurpation, rather than merely borrowing, of an old word by later, technical usage"? If so, what is it? For example, of old, the English word summer meant "that season of the ...
0
votes
3answers
186 views

What is the difference between “deployment” and “release”?

In work environment, we frequently encounter the words "deployment" and "release" in technical context. I often hear them used interchangeably also. It is mainly related to "Release and Deployment ...
4
votes
3answers
196 views

Is the word “comparator” widely used outside of IT and computing — say, in statistics?

I came across the word “comparator” in the report of International Monetary Fund under the title, “Can women save Japan?” (WP/12/248) co-authored by Chad Steinberg and Masao Nakane “Japan has FLP ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Can the term “G-Man” be used to describe a Government official who is not an FBI agent?

Earlier today I was doing Merl Reagle's crossword and one of the clues was "Fraud fighting Fed." The answer turned out to be "T-Man," being short for "Treasury Man." So, this got me thinking... ...
12
votes
4answers
959 views

In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?

I'm genuinely confused about this because at first I thought a spatula was a cooking tool resembling a flat pallet attached at an angle to the handle that could be used for activities such as flipping ...
2
votes
3answers
198 views

Informal Suffix Usage: -ity/ety

Sometimes in very informal or comic book language one will see phrases such as "bonkity bonk", "flippity-flop", and "knockity knock". Other examples include "crunchity", "swirlity", etc, etc. I have ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Might “equivocal” be applied to our scientific understandings?

I just read the question and answers about the meaning of "equivocal". Might "equivocal" be used to describe the wave and particle appreciations of light? The results of all inquiries and ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What is the word for “history of the study of the subject”?

Suppose the subject is nutrition. Is there a word for the history of the study of nutrition? Or the history of the study of a science for that matter? I thought it was one of those epi-ology words ...
5
votes
3answers
169 views

Using 'Gravity' As A Verb

Does anybody else use 'gravity' as a verb besides people in mining and engineering? Example: We have to move the tank up the hill so water can gravity to the flotation cells rather than needing to be ...
6
votes
3answers
245 views

Is there a word for selecting yourself as the target audience for an invention or product?

Let me explain this with an example. An inventor faces a problem, he decides to develop a solution for it. Initially, he is the main target audience for his invention. I was wondering if there was an ...
-1
votes
2answers
86 views

Correct? “We make no prescriptions …”

Can I use "We make no prescriptions about ..."? This dictionary doesn't give any definition of the word "prescription" apart from Medical or Legal jargon.
2
votes
1answer
191 views

What are single views of an online banner ad called?

I am developing a web application for managing banners, advertisements, etc. I am not sure what the correct name for one 'view' of a banner is. I need to name it somehow to be able to report ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?

This sounds like a silly question, but I've heard some very strong opinions about this, so I find this intriguing. A hot dog is a type of sausage (at least according to Merriam-Webster, Wikipedia, ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is it called 'renewable energy'?

There's a lot of buzz these days about 'renewable energy', and with Germany's recent decision to close down their nuclear plants by 2012, activists are talking about moving to completely 'renewable ...
3
votes
4answers
350 views

Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?

I hope this question isn't off-topic. I heard a madrigal with the following verse which bothers me somewhat, grammatically. Cruel, wilt thou persever? Peace to leave ever? Peace shalt thou have and ...
3
votes
3answers
686 views

Thieves' words for their victims

What words might a thief (of any variety) use to describe the victims of his theft? Con artists in film often use "mark", for example. Is there other jargon specific to the con branch* of crime? How ...