2
votes
3answers
99 views

What's the accusative absolute?

I'm no grammarian and so I am seeking an informal and comprehensible answer. I read the following definition for accusative-absolute, but I don't fully understand it, possibly due to the many ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Grammatical term for a noun phrase which consists of an alternate descriptor of the object

(EDIT: It's called a noun phrase, not a clause) I'm wondering what the correct term for this type of clause is, and what the appropriate punctuation is. For example: "I have lost my red hat, the ...
1
vote
2answers
71 views

Namesake used when refering to surname only

Can you use namesake when refering to just someone's surname? Eg If the persons name is David Chaplin, can you say: "unlike his namesake, Chaplin's efforts are nothing to laugh at." ?
2
votes
3answers
78 views

What is the grammatical term for is? [closed]

What is the grammatical term for "is"? For example if the sentence is "Jane is Drawing", "Jane" is the Noun and "Drawing" is the verb, but what is "is"?
5
votes
6answers
155 views

We can see the shrine “become/becomes” big

I'm correcting some writing and the student wrote, We can see the shrine become big, little by little, from the ferry. As far as I'm concerned, it's grammatically okay, but I'm having trouble ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

How to use the term “Inline link”?

I am writing a Terms of Service for a website and I am wondering if both of these examples are correct: "Inline link to an image" "In-line link of an image" Inline linking (also known as ...
6
votes
2answers
394 views

Why are they called Hudson Bay and Bay of Biscay? Why Mediterranean Sea and Sea of Japan?

I was looking up a French town on Google Maps, when it struck me. There are bays shown as "Bay of ..." on the map, as well others listed as "... Bay". Their naming seems to be consistent with the ...
6
votes
2answers
232 views

What is the name of the clause stating that the expected result did not follow the cause stated in the main clause?

What is the name of the clause stating that the expected result did not follow the cause stated in the main clause? "He did not succeed although he worked hard." concessive clause (1st clause = ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

Is it correct to say “a context aware modeling of trust”?

Towards a context aware modeling of trust and access control based on the user behavior and capabilities I was reading some documentation and this phrase stopped me! Is it correct after all?
4
votes
1answer
106 views

Toll Booths 1,2 and 5

Suppose I have a collection of numbered items, say toll booths that are numbered from 1 to 10. Consider three sentences: Toll booth 4 is closed today. Toll booth 1, toll booth 2, and toll ...
2
votes
1answer
450 views

What are “How to … ?” questions (errors) called?

I see questions formed like "How to do this?" every day. They are so frequent that I wonder if there is a name for grammatical errors of this kind.
0
votes
1answer
74 views

make question for periodic event

I like to make question about the happening of some events whether it is happened every day or every week or every month...etc how can i make question? this is my try: Does this event happen every ...
1
vote
2answers
316 views

What does “any or any” mean in a legal text?

I have been going through several legal documents lately and have realised that a lot of them use the fragment "any or any" within some sentences. Failing to place a guard or fence or warning ...
0
votes
2answers
310 views

Antecedents of indefinite pronouns

Consider the sentence, "Most of the apples are fresh." Is it incorrect to say that apples is the antecedent of the indefinite pronoun most?
-1
votes
4answers
2k views

What do you call the person who performs an action?

What do you call the person who does the verb? For instance, in the sentence John killed Frank what is the grammatical term for John? I don't know if "agent" is the right word?
-3
votes
3answers
647 views

What is the term for words that have a hyphen between them? [closed]

For example: "indisputably-accurate"; "the quickly-ran event"; "the truck-driving man"; "the under-slept woman"; "the power-possessing orb". What is the term for the words that surround the hyphen?
-1
votes
1answer
228 views

What term describes the relationship between 'collectivism' and 'collectivisation'?

What is collectivism, in terms of grammar, of collectivisation? Put another way: Collectivism is the [which word?] of collectivisation? Another example word pair might be centralism and ...
11
votes
4answers
628 views

How much not better than average is enough?

This is adapted from a silly conversation I had about a baseball player. It set me wondering how to describe this sort of wordplay linguistically. HIM: Do we leave Jay in center? HER: He's ...
9
votes
1answer
415 views

What is this ‘-ing’ structure?

Consider the following sentence: The Bactrian camel is well adapted to the extreme climate of its native Mongolia, having thick fur and underwool that keep it warm in winter and also insulate ...
39
votes
7answers
2k views

What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Term for types of first person plural

I've noticed that there are two types of first person plural – one where the addressee is included, and one where she or he isn't. For example: With addressee included: Let us go. What's our plan? ...
3
votes
4answers
6k views

Continuous vs contiguous when talking about files

Files on a file system can be fragmented meaning they're split into several parts that are scattered all over hard disk. This usually means that reading these files is much slower because disk ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

addressee-new vs discourse-new

Regarding terminology used by CEGL as referenced in this question, can anyone explain the difference between addressee-new and discourse-new? My understanding of addressee-new is that this refers to ...
1
vote
2answers
541 views

What's the grammatical term for this phenomenon? [closed]

There is obviously a big essential difference between "no towel" and "there isn't a towel". I mean, the former cannot probably serve as a complete sentence, while the latter can. The former can ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

“Bring 6 eggs. If there are potatoes, bring 9.”

This is with reference to this comic, called A Programmer's Life (translated from Portuguese): Programmer: My wife asked me to go to the market and said: “Bring six eggs. If there are potatoes, ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

What do we call an adjective made of a verb?

What do we call adjectives formed from verbs? For example: Lost is an adjective made from lose, Forgotten is an adjective made from forget, Broken is an adjective made from break. What is the ...
6
votes
2answers
657 views

What's the rule for writing sentences with parallel clauses?

I've sometimes seen very nicely written sentences that have 2 clauses: the first is a full sentence, while the second, which is supposed to have a similar structure, was shorten into a special ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
5
votes
2answers
522 views

What do you call a verb which accepts 2 nouns?

In English, there are intransitive verbs which can't used with a noun, or aren't being used with a noun (eg. listen, die, ...), and transitive verbs which can be (eg. almost all of them). However, ...
0
votes
1answer
224 views

Please define the grammar errors (by their generally accepted terms) in this sentence

My goal in asking this question is to learn to name my errors. I write many sentences and think, "that's not right," and then I change it to make it sound better. It usually works well (and my boss ...
4
votes
3answers
924 views

Is there a different grammatical term for “If I was” than for “If I were”?

Many people would say the correct form is "If I were rich ...". In modern colloquial English though most younger people would say "If I was rich ...". Prescriptivists might say the latter is "the ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Is the conditional a mood or a tense?

Is the conditional a mood or a tense? I've heard it described in both ways. It seems more like a mood as it is often lumped with hypothetical constructions and the subjunctive mood. I could see it ...
4
votes
2answers
34k views

What do first, second, and third person perspective mean? Why are they so called?

I am aware of the terms first person, second person and third person from grammar, but I have also seen them used in other contexts, in particular first person perspective with regard to video games. ...
7
votes
3answers
5k views

“I'm having” - an illness?

What is I'm having in grammar terms? Is it something near the present, the near future? As in I'm having a party tomorrow? Example (not about the near future), I'm having trouble coming up with a ...
3
votes
5answers
14k views

Mixing up “quiet” and “quite”: spelling or grammar error?

Look at this sentence: It wasn't quiet what I wanted And this one: The music was too quite for me Obviously quiet and quite are mixed up. Is this considered a spelling mistake? In both ...
6
votes
1answer
184 views

What is the name of words like 'bottle' or 'clove' that provide a singular for a counted item?

Title pretty much askes the question. What is the term for words like 'bottle', 'cup' or 'clove' (as in clove of garlic). Are they counters, countables, determiners...? I swear it's on the tip of ...
26
votes
4answers
14k views

How does the phrase “used to” work, grammatically?

It is common to hear people say "used to" to indicate that they did something in the past but no longer do; for example, "I used to play basketball." How would "used to," used in that context, fit ...