Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Collective term for race, gender, age, religion, income class, etc

I'm writing an article for a political website about the major traits that make an individual what he or she is (in terms of wealth, human rights, oppression or lack thereof, etc.). They include ...
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46 views

Non-repudiable vs non-refutable vs non-reputable in computer security

In computer security there is a concept known as: non-repudiation "Non-repudiation refers to a state of affairs where the purported maker of a statement will not be able to successfully challenge the ...
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35 views

Is there a word for the letter that a diacritic is applied to?

If I am speaking about a letter that has a diacritical mark (e.g. 'á'), what word or phrase should I use to reference the base letter (e.g. 'a')? I'm looking for something a little more concise than ...
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1answer
86 views

A word or phrase for an unremarkable event that occurs with uncanny frequency

I am looking for a word or phrase for an unremarkable event that occurs with uncanny frequency. To give a specific example, one might be seeing a random shopper drop their bag every time you enter a ...
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2answers
539 views

Name for a verb that switches meaning depending on whether it has an object

Consider the sentences: The door closes. Emily closes the door. In both cases, it's the door that's being closed, even though "the door" is the subject of the first sentence and the object ...
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1answer
19 views

Correct term for “solo investigator” in a research

I'm looking for a phrase that describes a condition where one and only one person is doing academic research, from proposal to paper report - as opposed to the work being done in a team. The phrase ...
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1answer
71 views

Why Literacy “Rate”?

I recently had a discussion with a friend, and he was using a phrase repeatedly which said "Conversion Rate vs Time". I pointed out to him that Rate already has the time factor, so you don't have to ...
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28 views

Term for “there” support? [duplicate]

I am currently learning German on Duolingo and one of the phrases for translation is "There is oil on the shirts" which in German comes out as "Oil is on the shirts" which works just as well in ...
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358 views

What's a better word for “hugbox”?

What's a better word for what the term 'hugbox' suggests; i.e. an environment in which one is surrounded by likeminded people and as such is likely to have their preconceptions reinforced rather than ...
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43 views

Why is “dynamic” modality so called?

It is said that there are three types of modality: deontic, epistemic and dynamic. Here are sample sentences for each type of modality: (1) You can stay as long as you want. [deontic] (2) ...
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1answer
54 views

What is the linguistic perception phenomenon when a person can read a word whose inner letters are rearranged?

What is this linguistic perception phenomenon called? Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht ...
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115 views

What do you call someone who builds fences

What do you call someone who builds fences other than maybe "fence builder"? Is there a specialized name for that - maybe even archaic? Example: A smithy smith works with metal (Correction @Chris ...
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37 views

Term to express a range of fluctuation

I am trying to make a term for a function equipped on an image sensor. The term is to express "the upper limit of fluctuation allowance in image size which is specified in %" The value of percentage ...
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1answer
85 views

What does it mean when a denomination is described to be “pietistic”? [closed]

What does it mean when a denomination or theological tradition is described to be "pietistic"? The definitions of Merriam-Webster for "pietistic" mean: of or relating to Pietism a : of or ...
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1k views

Of Yuppies and Yippies and Hippies

While innocently passing by on my way to Big Rep City, I happened to overhear (alright! I was dropping eaves) a dialogue in some podunk Commentary Cafe wherein two fellow ELU consumers were debating ...
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31 views

“First day after expiration date” term

What term can be used to define the first day of the time interval where an item expires? For example, my driving license expires on 2015.01.31; the date of 2015.02.01 is "first day of invalidity" or ...
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22 views

Term for Successful Sale after Demoing Product

I believe there is a business term for such an event, but I can't recall what it is. An example would be a vacuum salesman showing a prospective buyer how a vacuum works, and the buyer ends up ...
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5answers
75 views

How to name non-web software? [duplicate]

I am writing an article that is focus on websites and web applications. I also need to refer to the rest software products. But I don't know how to properly name them. I could say "non-web software", ...
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3answers
170 views

What is the origin of “pre-plan”?

Although I searched fairly extensively, I couldn't find any references as to the origins of pre-plan. According to Online Etymology Dictionary, pre-arranged and prearranged have existed since 1792 ...
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102 views

What is the skill of “remembering all the variables involved in a situation” called?

What is the skill of being able to recall to mind all of the variables involved in a situation called? For instance, if I have to get together a bunch of documents for a lawyer, and he asks for all ...
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2answers
53 views

Is the phrase “logic and reason” grammatically correct?

I have always interpreted logic to mean a systematic form (premise-reason-conclusion) of reason. So it seems that you are saying one word (reason) and a branch of that word (logic). But the "and" ...
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67 views

What kind of wordplay is this?

In his book Humorous English, Evan Esar gives example uses of devices he broadly labels synonymics. He writes of synonymic puns: Many a wife sends her husband to an early grave with a series of ...
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79 views

Some good derogatory terms for nobility or upper class? [closed]

I'm in need of some derogatory terms for nobles for a story I'm writing, something for a fantastical medieval based world. The more the merrier!
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Older mineral names

When browsing through names of minerals in English, one notices that they appear to very commonly be of Latin origin or otherwise latinized or at least foreign; I mean names like "Magnetite", ...
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75 views

Looking for a word describing “habits which lost their original purpose”

I know there is a certain word which could describe rituals/habits which are being practiced despite the fact they lost their original purpose. I saw it in context of practicing some religious ...
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129 views

Is there a technical name for this kind of wordplay?

In his book Humorous English, Evan Esar writes, The blended compound is the fusion of two compounds, with the terminal word of one being the same or similar to the initial word of the other. By ...
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3answers
480 views

Is there a term for letting out an exasperated sigh through the nose?

Is there a term for when a person is getting really irritated/frustrated by someone, but they don't want to yell, so they do that thing where they exhale sharply through their nose? Say, for example, ...
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391 views

Opposite of “mutually exclusive”

The best I can think of is "necessarily accompanying", but it sounds awkward. Most answers I looked up give words like "concordant" and "accompanying", but these words have more passive definitions ...
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1answer
44 views

What do you call getting something in a video game at the very last second?

I remember there was a game in which you had to collect powerups while you were on a minetrack, and there were some jumps you had to make at the very last second to get certain power ups. Basically, ...
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263 views

“He is a genius, he is.” Is there a term for the “he is” addition to this sentence?

Just as we have tail-questions (or question tags), affirmative additions to affirmative remarks ("so do I", "so did he") and negative additions to negative remarks ("neither do I", "neither would I", ...
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7k views

What does 'TL;DR' mean and how is it used?

I do my best, at my advanced age, to come to grips with the apparent acceptability of such widely used words/expressions/abbreviations as lol/LOL, IMHO, AFAIK, etc. However, TLDR/tl;dr defeats me. ...
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Etymology of a “pegged CPU”

There's a slightly obscure, slang meaning in tech circles of the word "pegged" as it relates to a computer's CPU. When it is fully utilised for a duration (at least several seconds), you can say that ...
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Terminology of a non-numbered page of text having 12 points?

I was in a law lecture and the lecturer referred to a sentence three-quarters down a slab of unstructured text as 'point 9'. The idea being, she explained, that a page of text 'has 12 points' and you ...
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What do you call two words that contradict each other in a sentence?

I'm having trouble as to what you call two words that contradict each other. For example, "That was weirdly normal." I think this kind of word play is used in puns and jokes. But I do not know how you ...
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1answer
17k views

What does 'on-premises' mean?

Here is the example sentence. Windows Azure Caching was developed from an on-premises Caching solution that shipped with Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server. What does 'on-premises' ...
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Term for a person who can read but cannot write

I'm looking for a term to accurately describe a person who can only read but cannot write. While I'm primarily concerned with people who have never learned to write, I would also be interested in any ...
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7answers
3k views

What exactly is an “adverb”?

From comments to “Weekdays” used as an adverb", I learn that The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary says "open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.", shows the word weekdays is an adverb. It seems to me ...
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5answers
184 views

“Printfing” or “printingf”?

At this point the program starts printfing the pot value. At this point the program starts printingf the pot value. Both sound wrong, and yet... one of them must be used.
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In navigation, what's the difference between bearing, heading, direction, and course?

Specifically, in real-world use, I would think that "course" and "heading" tend to imply a vector of movement, while "bearing" and "direction" might refer only to which way one is facing. I am ...
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What type of phrase is “done”?

Examples are provided aplenty, from chef Gordon Ramsay: Fry. Roast. Drizzle. Done. Drizzle olive into the sauce circling the fish. Done. But you also see the term used on buttons in ...
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Distinguish “naming” and “telling” part of simple sentence with compound predicate

Dad caught fish and cooked them for supper. This is a question from a test that my son missed; he is in the second grade. The instructions for the test are as follows: Put one line under the ...
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What does “rising senior” mean and what countries use it?

I know it is something to do with universities, but as I have never come across the term before today (and have lived in England all my life including going to an English university), I am assuming it ...
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5answers
9k views

Is incorrect capitalization considered a spelling error?

Is incorrect capitalization, such as the lowercase "i" in can [this is not the sic you're after] i [this sic] have an if statement within a dialog box code? considered a spelling mistake, or ...
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7k views

What's the difference between orthography and spelling?

The terms "spelling" and "orthography" seem to be largely synonymous. What is the difference really? Is it that "orthography" is a more formal or technical term and hence more well-defined? Or is it ...
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4answers
15k views

Is there a name for the final section of a letter?

When writing a letter it typically starts out "Dear..." and then has the content, then before you sign it you might have a formal or informal (depending on who you're writing to) sign off, for ...
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17k views

Mixing up “quiet” and “quite”: spelling or grammar error?

Look at this sentence: It wasn't quiet what I wanted And this one: The music was too quite for me Obviously quiet and quite are mixed up. Is this considered a spelling mistake? In both ...
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6k views

Which term correctly identifies those who enjoy programming/technology: “geek” or “nerd”?

Which term correctly identifies those who enjoy and are involved with programming and technology, geek or nerd?
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How does one pronounce the '@' symbol?

How can I pronounce @ symbol: At / At the rate? Can I use it in a sentence? Please explain with an example.
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19k views

Difference between “commentor” and “commentator”

What is the difference between commentor and commentator? Is commentor or commenter a legitimate English word?
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21k views

What is the most professional name for “squiggly bracket”?

I am creating a software training video and need to refer to these brackets: { } I usually call them "squiggly brackets" or "curly brackets". Is there a more professional name?