Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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2
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2answers
43 views

A term for “real law”

I am looking for a term to denote "real" law, as distinct from "theoretical law". An alternate formulation is to say that I am looking for a term to be a legal equivalent/version of "realpolitik". ...
1
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1answer
26 views

In social networks, what is the person who is friend with numerous group of friends called?

Assume there is a class of a hundred students. Naturally, they won't all be friends - or, at least, good friends - with each other and all hang out together; they will form small groups of, say, five ...
7
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5answers
445 views

Word for a ‘vignette’ on a specific topic within a book

I have a very strong, nagging suspicion that there is a specific term for what I am thinking of here, but I cannot for the life of me recall it. In books, it is fairly common to see brief—or ...
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0answers
15 views

What is another way to say “Helped me find clarity in my life”?

I'm trying to say that a certain experience helped me realize what I want to do with my life because it helped me better understand myself. I'm trying to find an expression that communicates this that ...
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2answers
51 views

What is another way to say “I needed to explore beyond my comfort zone”? [on hold]

I'm writing an essay for medical school applications. Both my parents were physicians, so it is what I was familiar with growing up. Instead of pursuing medicine in college, I decided to pursue ...
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2answers
43 views

Is “bench press” a valid name for the bench used for bench pressing?

Someone asked this on Russian.SE: How should one express the concept of "take turns" in Russian? For example, taking turns using the bench press in the gym, or taking turns on the Xbox ...
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0answers
57 views

How to express that two methods each have their advantages and disadvantages? [on hold]

I am writing a paper comparing two methods, and they each have their own advantages and disadvantages. But saying "they each have their own advantages and disadvantages" is a little wordy. Are there ...
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5answers
146 views

What is a hypernym for the ascending and descending legs of a flight?

If an airline flight is everything that happens in between your starting and ending gates. What is the generic term for each time the plane ascends or descends during an air route? In layman terms, ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the technical term for an infinite sentence?

Is there a name for the infinite (repeating, unending) sentence or paragraph? Here is an example of what I mean: Joe Blow is a chef, painter, author and vocalist from San Francisco who enjoys vinyl ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Why are open source and closed source usually not hyphenated? Should they be? [on hold]

Typically, English writers do not hyphenate open source or closed source when referring to computer software. Why is this? Should they be hyphenated or is it best to not use hyphens for these terms?
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0answers
28 views

How to describe the lower area of upper ray in a 'hockey stick'-shape angle?

I am trying to describe the area depicted below. It is the beginning of the upper ray coming from the vertex of the obtuse angle in a 'hockey stick'-shaped function. (In other words, it's an area past ...
0
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1answer
79 views

The myth of metals

The Greeks had a myth of metals. It was the idea that citizens were born of a certain metal according to their place in society. It was a useful lie- something that motivated people to do the right ...
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2answers
67 views

Is there a single word for a rational fear?

If a phobia is an irrational fear, it's there a word for a fear that is rational?
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1answer
49 views

Difference beween “oscillate”, “vibrate”, “shake”, “quake”, “resonate”? [closed]

[Background] I am not a native English speaker. I am learning electronics and comes to some circuit that can "oscillate". [Question] I want to know the difference beween "oscillate", "vibrate", "...
0
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0answers
27 views

What is the term for using a word to refer to things related to the word?

For instance, if I say: I love Shakespeare! I'm not saying that I love Shakespeare the man, I'm saying that I love his works. Another example I can think of is: I like collecting history. ...
3
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0answers
78 views

What is the name for the phenomenon or process by which the brain knows what “it” in a sentence refers to ? [migrated]

What is the name for the phenomenon or process by which the brain knows what "it" in a sentence refers to ? For example : I left my book on the table but when I came back, IT wasn't there.
4
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2answers
96 views

What are the leading or trailing days on a monthly calendar called?

Example sentence: When viewing the month version of the calendar online, users can turn on/off the view of [whatchamacallit] days from other months. When you look at a monthly calendar, and ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Term for piecemeal hospital bills

A minor emergency sends you to the nearest hospital, where you get an examination, including X-rays and an MRI. Fortunately, you have health insurance. But a few weeks later, you get get a bill from ...
2
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4answers
71 views

Correct English term to indicate “the culture one is born in”? [closed]

What is the English term that one uses to indicate "the culture one is born in"?
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5answers
2k views

What is the term for the condition in which someone is mentally fragile due to explosion?

Some soldiers develop chronic psychological complications due to being too close to an explosion. They become somehow unstable, very irritable or confused. I mean being mentally ill because of being ...
0
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1answer
35 views

What are “get well” efforts?

What is the meaning of the phrase "get well" efforts? For example: "Get Well" efforts for newly deployed systems were becoming a standard practice and were consuming funds intended for more ...
5
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6answers
152 views

Generalized statements, mostly political

Is there a term used for statements made by politicians (and others) that are nebulous and allow people to infer what they want from them? For example, politicians speak about "Christian values", "...
15
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5answers
884 views

Architectural term for this large horizontal structure below an external window?

What would one call the large horizontal structural fixture (on which the five faces are embedded)? The image is from the Chicago Civic Opera Building, built in 1928. This throne-shaped 49-story ...
4
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2answers
48 views

What do you call an android that used to be human? (no organic parts)

I was wondering - Let's say we take your consciousness and put it in a complete cybernetic body? What would the term for that would be? I thought it would be Cyborg at first, But I know that's short ...
40
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7answers
4k views

A word for when you speak ill of something and it turns out the person you are speaking to likes that thing

Is there a word describing the phenomenon of when you insult or speak badly of something but it turns out the person you are speaking to likes or owns or is related to that thing? E.G. you say "The ...
0
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3answers
50 views

What is the term for a person that feels the urge to read everything?

It seems there could be more than one term, to describe different flavors of this urge: The urge to read may stem from inherent curiosity, so "bookworm" may fit. It is not precise enough because the ...
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2answers
19 views

Single word for watching and/or tracking

On an online discussion forum, there is a count of "Unread" posts, but actually it's new activity in topics which are marked by the user as "watching" or "tracking" (which have specific consequences). ...
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0answers
50 views

Whence visa “stamp”?

This question is inspired by http://travel.stackexchange.com/questions/69496/whats-the-deal-with-stamping-us-visas. The US government calls the visa sticker that is inserted into a passport a foil. ...
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15answers
3k views

What is a term to refer to two ideas in exact opposition (e.g. good & bad, positive & negative)? [closed]

So basically, I know the name for both sides of a coin, yet not the coin itself. In other words, when you refer to a coin, you don't want to say 'this object with one side heads, and the other tails',...
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1answer
126 views

Name for 'it' within grammar

I was about to ask a question like this: I just accidentally stabbed myself in the finger with a very sharp knife; when referring to the knife directly, is it more correct to say: "the knife ...
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0answers
25 views

Henceforth, heretofore and notwithstanding thenceforward wherewithal

I love * these kind of words: Moreover, therefore, heretofore, hereto, however, notwithstanding, furthermore, henceforth, wherefore, nonetheless, nevertheless, although, withal, howbeit, ...
0
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1answer
37 views

When YOU say 'you', instead of 'I' - what is that?

What is the name of the mechanism when YOU say 'you', instead of 'I' when YOU'RE talking about yourself, but with someone else? The capitalised instances above serve as an example of what I'm talking ...
1
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1answer
33 views

What is an adjective that describes 'one way' and 'two way' flow?

A few example are in order: One way flow An injection. A river flowing into an ocean. A mothers love. Two way flow Phone calls. The flow of water between two oceans. Herpies. So, as you can ...
9
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4answers
873 views

Is the term 'rubric' only used by educators and teachers? [closed]

I recently discovered one of those words that describe something you are familiar with but have never heard of or used before. When I was in high school and university, the teachers always used the ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Has there been a decrease of use of the word “rend” in literature?

The word "rend" (Verb: "to tear (something) into pieces with force or violence") is such an effective word. Descriptive and visceral. Yet it seems to me it's fading from literature and becoming an ...
8
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5answers
815 views

What do you call it when you “extend” a word? [closed]

On a programming site, I noticed http://stackoverflow.com/questions/37460404/unexplained-increasement-of-variable a beautiful word use, "increasement." Is there a term for, or how would you refer ...
2
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2answers
63 views

Is nationalism specifically secular?

Does the word nationalism specifically imply a feeling of kindred superiority in a secular sense? For instance, if country X opposes themselves to country Y based on religious practice or reasons, ...
0
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0answers
36 views

what is the way of ending formal mails?

what are the ways in which we can end formal mails and also let me know what kind of beginnings are appropriate for formal mails? I generally mention : Opening:Dear Sir/Madam Closing: Thanks and ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Is there a term for this phenomenon?

I've been wondering for a while now whether there is a word (or linguistic term) that specifically refers to an instance where a clause can be part of either the clause before it or the clause after ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Is the term “step-action table” jargon?

I'm an engineer. My doc team has been using step-action tables to create user-facing documentation for some software that I've built recently. I think these tables are awesome, but I keep seeing ...
3
votes
2answers
37 views

What's the name for when a layman thinks a technical task is easier than it actually is?

As a software engineer, my job is highly technical. A co-worker and I were remarking that frequently our non-technical co-workers will assume that we're not working if a task takes longer than they ...
0
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2answers
75 views

What do we call a person who studied humanities, e.g. at university or college?

What do we call a person who has a background in the humanities as a field of study, e.g. linguistics, comparative literature, but isn't necessarily a humanities academic? Is that correct to say a ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

Mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive

Is there a word that means "Mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive" (as an adjective) or "to be mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive" (as a verb), or is there a noun that describes ...
1
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4answers
101 views

What is the word for this container?

It's glazed ceramic, tan and brown. There's no handle. It's about 21" tall and about 10" diameter. It's quite heavy. The sides are straight up and down. Thank you.
0
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2answers
20 views

For a business document, what term would be used for stating the last time the document has been modified?

I need to translate a german business document where in the footnote of each page a single word or term determines the last approved modification of the document. So far, I found "as of", "as from", ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

In an official business document, what term do you use for cost estimates in work days?

For a translation of a german document to english, I need a term for extimating how long a task will take. I've found that some people seem to use "rate per day" or "man-days", where the latter would ...
0
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0answers
26 views

What is the terminology for a stone used for sculpting?

So, when sculpting, the sculpture is originally an irregular piece of stone. Is there any special word for that piece of stone?
0
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5answers
51 views

Is there a term to describe the physical location of an object, as well as the time in which it exists?

Where such a term would reference the location/time of an object, almost like it was of a property of the object. That is to say, if a duck is red, blue, yellow etc, we describe it has having a ...
0
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2answers
42 views

How to refer to sections of an S-shaped curve?

Suppose that I have an S-shaped curve. What term do I use to refer to each of these three separate sections of the curve: the upper section, which starts from the top end to the leftmost bend, the ...