Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Help with direct equivalents? [on hold]

3 questions: Is there a direct equivalent to the Bahasa term 'kepedasan', as in "Hei, kamu kepedasan ya?" in English? and greget as in 'Makan jus paku BIAR GREGET' (found on the Indonesian 9GAG, 1cak) ...
14
votes
3answers
185 views

Is there a word for “a person from another race”?

I am searching for a word that means ‘of another race’ to be used in context of a sentence such as "She was deeply protective to her [of other race], foster children." "They shunned the ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

What do you call a murderer who burns their victims alive?

I promise this isn't as weird as it sounds. I've tried a bit of Googling but I can't find anything that works well. I'm looking for a single word for a pyromaniac that burns people alive. The ...
3
votes
2answers
66 views

Is there a term for someone who barely moves their arms whilst walking?

I know someone who barely moves his arms when he walks, a bit like Frankenstein's monster. There is a Seinfeld episode ("The Summer of George") in which someone with the same behaviour is made fun of ...
2
votes
3answers
176 views
+50

An adjective which means “the father of a bride gives her away”?

What adjective could I use to describe the typical ‘Western’ wedding custom, whereby the father of the bride gives his daughter away? I need an adjective that describes this tradition, in order to ...
5
votes
1answer
56 views

Best or technical term for the act of including a *purposeful gaff* in writing?

Although I suspect there are applicable examples in literature and newsprint, the specific context here is the online practice of either including a dud, or excluding an obvious/needed example in a ...
3
votes
2answers
115 views

In Baseball, is there a specific term for the team that bats second?

I am studying the similarities between Cricket and Baseball. I understood that every Baseball game consists of a series of innings (7-9 depending on the league) where one team tries to score as much ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

What do I call software as opposed to DB/DBMS?

In my documentation I'm trying to refer to the program in context of interaction with database / DBMS as opposed to the latter. How do I call such program or software? "Outbound", "outer", "calling", ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

How to differentiate from multiple interpretations of the word “language”

Suppose I'm currently writing an introduction to programming languages. One of my paragraphs start as follows: Everyone can learn how to program. It is like learning a new language. [...] In ...
0
votes
4answers
139 views

What official English words describe these activities?

Court man goes to bank, and ask for information about suspect's account. Court man goes to bank, and ask for taking steps to control suspect's account, such as freeze suspect's account or unfreeze ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Modern Term for Right/Secondary Click

In order to access secondary functions in a graphical interface (such as a context menu), users often have to "right click" an object on the screen. Some variations of this terminology I have seen ...
14
votes
6answers
554 views

“Digital computer” in the 1940s

I was watching the DVD movie Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing, the British mathematician who helped crack the Nazi's enigma code in WWII. In one key scene, Turing uses the ...
6
votes
3answers
134 views

Why is German anti-aircraft fire called “Archibald”?

Reading The War Illustrated (January 30th, 1915 number), I came across this passage:- At this speed they offer a comparatively stationary mark for the German anti-aircraft guns, always known as ...
4
votes
3answers
63 views

What is the correct term for a must-answer-correctly question in a test?

In some tests a question is critical, ie. answering that question incorrectly makes you fail the whole test, even if that's your only wrong answer. I tried serching for 'sudden death question' but it ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Is “Inversely Proportional” the right term here?

The effort required to design something is inversely proportional to the simplicity of the result. -Roy T. Fielding, http://roy.gbiv.com/untangled/2008/rest-apis-must-be-hypertext-driven ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Which one is common: “Diagnostic” or “Diagnostics”

I'm translating the interface texts of an industrial control panel software and got stuck on this one. The module I'm referring to has some lists containing the sensors and switches for the digital ...
0
votes
2answers
29 views

Term for “representative” animal sound?

Is there a term for the sound word associated with a certain type of animal, that is considered the most frequent or usual representation? e.g. Cat - meow; Duck - quack; Owl - whoo; Frog - ribbit; ...
-1
votes
0answers
17 views

Using 'thing' to describe an object

I was just wondering what the literary device for using a word such as 'thing' to describe something (in my case a sculpture) distastefully is? For example “He knew beauty. She was. That thing ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Correct term for computer language that's close to human in syntax

I've always used the term canonical syntax to refer to a computer language, the syntax of which is verbose and resembles the patter in conventional human speech. Recently, I learned that canonical ...
1
vote
2answers
26 views

A Term for a Location Where a Person has Stopped or Idled for an allocated length of time

I am developing a Geographic Information System where GPS coordinates are gathered and analyzed in a server. I have a module where I collect coordinates/points in a map where a person has stopped for ...
6
votes
8answers
632 views

Word for the opposite of digital art

I'm looking for a word to distinguish digital artwork from non-digital artwork. I've already looked at various suggestions for the opposite of the word digital, but none seem to fit the concept. ...
5
votes
3answers
37 views

Are there any terms analogous to “novelization” for other types of adaptations?

Occasionally, as part of the release of an original movie, the production company will commission a writer to produce a full-length novel based on the script. This happened recently, for example, with ...
0
votes
1answer
191 views

What does the phrase “this the new vivy and millennium wavy” mean? Is it a slang?

I was listening to the new Chris Brown's album, "Royalty" and the last track/song called "U Did It" which features the rapper Future has the following line that I didn't understand at all: I just ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Is there a more accurate way to describe “short vowels” and “long vowels”?

I was taught in primary school about "short vowels" vs "long vowels". Although it is a simplistic way to teach children, it is also inaccurate, because the sounds are different, not just longer and ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

What is the term for following a number, ie: ten (10) with the numeric version for clarity

I see this a fair bit in journal papers, and wanted to know if there is a specific reason and/or term for this: having the spelled/lexical version of a number followed by the literal/logical ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

What do the letters 's.o.s.' mean in annotations of a person's service in wartime S.O.E.? Well-known phrase, or cryptic?

I came across the following note when researching National Archives:- '28.7.44 Part 111 orders advised: 21371 has been s.o.s. I.S.R.B. w.e.f. 21.7.44' I know what the other abbreviations mean, ...
0
votes
4answers
55 views

Is there a specific term for the short descriptions of a movie or TV episode present in TV guides?

In TV guides, there are often short descriptions of movies or episodes of a TV series, like the one pictured here: Is there a specific term for this kind of text?
3
votes
3answers
95 views

What should we call a part of a sentence which is neither a word nor a phrase?

I would like to refer to a part of a sentence which is neither a word nor a phrase, e.g., "I will recognize" in "I will recognize you". Should I call it an expression, a part of a sentence or ...
5
votes
3answers
52 views

The name of this grammar structure

It is a serious, and sometimes fatal, disease that may become epidemic in crowded, unsanitary living conditions. I'm trying to find the name of grammar structure (a very technological term, not ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Is there a special name for nouns that aren't preceded by an article?

This might only apply to a few nouns, but I was wondering if there is a special name for nouns that colloquially aren't preceded by an article. For example we say "eating dinner" instead of "eating a ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Early Modern English - How Many Uses of Conjugated Verbs in a Single Sentence

Using Early Modern English, can I have more than one conjugated verb in a sentence? For example, would I be more correct to say, "Thinkest thou that thou could take us to see him?" (Note that only ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

A word that describes a word for which there are no words [duplicate]

I have searched the internet, read every dictionary and scanned website after website, and cannot find a word that describes a word for which there are presently, in your language, no words. Does such ...
0
votes
4answers
84 views

Is there a term for replacing name with a number/code?

For example instead of using Mrs Johnson to use Subject 2332
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Is there a name for the irregular spelling difference between some nouns and verbs?

Most words that have a noun-form and a verb-form (noun/verb pairs) have identical spelling, e.g. a jump (n.), to jump (v.). However, some words have different spelling: advice (n.), advise (v.) ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Juxtaposition Without Contrast

I'm writing something in which I would like to point out something that's similar to juxtaposition, but without the contrast. Specifically, I'm trying to say that the proximity of a lamp and a loaf of ...
-5
votes
2answers
53 views

Need a term for all English words with a “.” at the end like “etc., Mr.” [closed]

Is there a name for words like Mr., etc., and Mrs.?
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Does the term “mass hero” exist in Western Countries?

"Mass Hero" is a popular term in India, especially down south, which implies an actor who has the versatility to sing, dance, romance, fight, laugh, cry, make the audience laugh and cry, apart from ...
4
votes
2answers
117 views

A word spoken rarely or never

I would like to know an unambiguous term used to designate words that are spoken vanishingly rarely, if at all. Words that are never spoken, _________, illustrate the fundamental difference ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

“time” for instants or durations in science

I am trying to describe the evolution of a motion which is composed of smooth parts called "free flights" and instantaneous impacts. For example, consider a bouncing ball: its motion is a succession ...
10
votes
2answers
712 views

Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
2
votes
4answers
47 views

Is there a word for a vocabulary associated with a particular work of fiction?

In his Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien coins the word "glitter" to be a collective noun for elves. In his books about Wonderland, Louis Carol invents an absolute mountain of words, words like ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Word meaning “of a single word”, or, “word” as an adjective

I am trying to find a term to describe something as being comprised of a single word, similar to how the term monosyllabic describes something as being of a single syllable. Does such a term exist? Or ...
1
vote
3answers
143 views

Origins of the term “High Definition”?

I just found a 1996 VHS cassette with 'Super HD' written on it. I was under the impression that 'High Definition' is a relatively new term but it seems pretty old :D. When did 'High Definition' come ...
0
votes
2answers
112 views

A more common term for “rabbit cold.”

I've been quoting Lolita (as well as Don Juan, Man and Superman, Pygmalion, Tom Jones, and various Mark Twain's witticisms) for a while now; some people might be annoyed by this, but I don't care ...
5
votes
2answers
61 views

Word Hunt: Audio Player Terminology

I'm looking for a few words today, in the context of Audio Players. I'm basically looking for words that match the following definitions: Here are my current known words, and their definitions: ...
3
votes
1answer
174 views

Who first objected to the term “chain mail”?

Recently, I've become aware of a new (to me) peeve: some people say that "chain mail/chain-mail/chainmail" is incorrect in some way when talking about armor, and that the proper way to refer to it is ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

subtract or substract

Subtract is considered the only correct verb, while substract is considered wrong or at least "very" obsolete. However, here is a guy, whose mother tongue is obviously English, and who uses substract ...
-2
votes
3answers
111 views

The word for not a word

A few years ago I came across a distinct word used to reference non-words. Most people's guesses are intuitive though unfortunately aren't correct as it's a very distinct word. We're not talking about ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

A superset of contractor, employee and businesses?

I need a single word to define an employee, contractor or any business entity (e.g. sole-proprietorship, corporation) that provides services in exchange for pay. I saw ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Does OED (and other major dictionaries) use the label “Slang” or only “Informal”?

I was just looking at some slang words in dictionaries. Surprisingly they are all (that I could find) labelled "informal". I couldn't find any labelled "slang". Same deal in other major ...