Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Minister vs. Secretary

In English language, the government structure of all countries are referred to with the terms of minister and minister. However, in English-speaking countries, Secretary and Department are used ...
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58 views

Phrases like “Fifth Beatle” or “Fourth estate”

Is there a term for phrases like Fifth Beatle when there's four main Beatles, fourth estate when there were originally only three estates, or Mongolia's Third neighbor policy when it only has two ...
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3answers
539 views

Is there a word for opposite numbers?

Example: -100 and +100 - is there a way of describing the relationship between these numbers? Obviously, I've already come up with "opposite", is there anything else? This is for use in an email. ...
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2answers
50 views

Is there an english word that means opposite yet complementary and orthogonal without a positive/negative connotation?

I am looking for a word to use to describe technical traits of a programming language that are the opposite of each other yet complementary. There is no positive or negative connotation to either ...
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2answers
30 views

Operator, operand - term for the result?

How the result may be called when applying an operator to its operands? In eg. programming one may be familiar with a so-called "expression" like this one from a SO question: x>y && z==5 ...
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2answers
55 views

A term for “removing” goods from a warehouse

Related to inventory management or accounting. Suppose I have a warehouse. I have some goods in it. Then I need to either sell, discard or otherwise expend them. Now I need to indicate in my books ...
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2answers
51 views

Suffix for something that is spoken about / mentioned

People involved in the analysis of conversational text have a frequent need to communicate about things that are spoken or written about. Similarly, we discuss the speaking or writing about a ...
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5answers
648 views
+50

How did “lobster” mean two different species?

This live crustacean is called astice in Italian. The one on the right is aragosta. They look very different from one another. The Italian dictionary describes the astice as having a deep (intense) ...
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1answer
23 views

“You gotta do what you gotta do” and similar expressions

You gotta do what you gotta do. It's there because it's there. Stuff, because stuff. Does this pattern of expression have a name? Existential assertion, maybe?
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1answer
47 views

Term for greetings that are also valedictions

Is there a specialized term in linguistics for those words that, in a given language, can be used to say both hello and goodbye? For instance, I've heard tell that in Hawaii the word "aloha" is used ...
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2answers
55 views

Would this qualify as sarcasm?

Let's suppose a guest brought something inappropriate, like maybe a polo mallet and helmet, to an informal beach party (presumably to show off), and I made a snarky remark to my companion: for ...
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0answers
22 views

Using a word incorrectly but related to the subject [closed]

During normal conversation I have noticed a tendency to use the word 'wedding' when I mean to say 'funeral'. This is so embarrassing! Why does this happen?
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0answers
34 views

Is there a term for a word that when spelt backwards forms another word? [duplicate]

I'm not talking about palindromes, but rather a word like "ward" which can form the word "draw" when spelt backwards. Thank you.
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2answers
37 views

Is reducing a complex, or technical, idea into a colloquial label, phrase or expression correctly described as an abbreviation?

I hope someone can tell me if there is a formal, or technical, English word or phrase that describes the result of summarising a complicated (technical, or obscure, apply equally well here) idea into ...
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4answers
250 views

What do you call an object inserted between two pieces (of bone)

Imagine someone has a broken bone and after removing any slivers there is a void between the two bone fragments. In order to assure that the bone grows back correctly, a piece is inserted between the ...
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6answers
65 views

Word to describe policy that attacks the environment?

I am putting together a presentation, and for the life of me I am unable to think of the word which describes this situation. I am discussing policy promoted by the US in Latin America during the 60s ...
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0answers
7 views

Is there a term for words that consist of the same syllable repeated? [migrated]

Words such as "mama", "papa", and "cancan" have only one unique syllable, and the whole word is just that syllable repeated once. Is there a name for such words? I am aware of reduplication, but I ...
5
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2answers
493 views

Why “inspector general”, and not “general inspector”, like German “Generalinspektor”? [duplicate]

I would expect the term "inspector general" to be "general inspector" instead. In part, that may be because I know the German variant as "Generalinspekteur" of "Generalinspektor". But I'm pretty ...
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3answers
173 views

What is the term for a group of liches?

What is the term for a group of liches? In fantasy fiction, a lich (/ˈlɪtʃ/; cognate to Dutch lijk, German Leiche, Norse lík and Swedish lik all meaning "corpse") is a type of undead creature. ...
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5answers
785 views

What is the term for the origin of a cliche?

From wiki sources : A cliche is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point of being ...
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1answer
391 views

What do we call those who discriminate against fat people?

Homophobia describes dislike or prejudice against homosexual people. Xenophobia describes an intense or irrational dislike or fear of people from other countries. What about those who discriminate ...
5
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2answers
161 views

Words for the “essential character” of each sense organ?

Looking at the definition for flavor and timbre, both are used to describe the "essential character" of a particular sense. If flavor is the essential character of our taste sense, and timbre is the ...
2
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4answers
48 views

Military terminology for the outbreak of war, or events which begin a World War?

I wanted to know if there are any general terms for the outbreak of war, or ones which refer specifically to the beginnings of the World Wars.
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4answers
102 views

What's the word for ‘the point at which an object loses balance’?

I'm trying to think of a formal word to describe the "tipping point" of an object. This would be the same point at which an object would be perfectly balanced.
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1answer
47 views

Word referring to process of curing meats?

I remember watching an episode of Floyd on France some time ago which described a French town as famous for their cured meats. I believe the word began with an 'H', and referred to the process of ...
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4answers
84 views

What is a good word for all sentient races?

I'm creating a historically inspired campaign where the standard fantasy races are extremely intermingled, and conflict is usually based on politics or religion, rather than species divisions. I ...
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5answers
393 views

What is the word for a group holding back one of its members trying to rise above the group?

I know that there is a word which specifically describes the following pattern: When a group will censor, cast bad votes, shout down, keep down or hold back one of its members trying to rise above ...
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2answers
63 views

Alternative to Without further ado?

It's a cliche talk in nearly all public speaking events, regardless of the type of the gathering (academic, business, wedding) and the level/class (top League school, fortune 500 company, 200 bucks ...
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6answers
313 views

Better term for clergyperson?

I'm creating a database that will include many types of people, and am faltering on the best way to classify "clergypeople". I'd prefer not to have separate entries for Deacon, Pastor, Priest, ...
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1answer
56 views

Is there a word for women who use prostitutes?

Men who use prostitutes are colloquially called johns. Is there a specific word for women who use prostitutes?
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2answers
34 views

What is the most widely accepted term for “circumventing support channels or standard operating procedures to gain faster or better service”?

Particularly in the case of tech support, what is the most widely accepted "correct" term for the act of artificially escalating a user or customer request, or maybe even circumventing support, ...
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3answers
153 views

Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?

In my answer to the question about the opposite for bug in programming, I referred to 'bug' as a slang word. Shaun Wilson, in his comment insists on 'bug' being a term that derived from a historical ...
3
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2answers
587 views

What do you call a word whose meaning changes according to when or where it is said?

I remember learning a specific name for words whose meaning depends on the time or location of their use, but as this was when I was in middle school (about 10 years ago), I can't remember what ...
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1answer
97 views

Can a sentence be “causative”, if the subject is only implied?

Original text Please _________ by your next of kin. a. section 9 have completed b. have completed section 9 c. have section 9 completed The correct answer is c But for the life of me, I ...
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6answers
509 views

What is the term for material lost when a batch is transferred from one vessel to another?

When making brownies or a banana cake, for example, some batter is left in the mixing bowl. Or the spilled sand when filling sandbags. What is the term for that lost material? Or the phenomenon of ...
2
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4answers
73 views

Alternative to “waiting period”

I cannot find an alternative to name this concept: In a negotiation process, after a proposal is presented, time is left for the parties to comment on or object to it. "Waiting period" alludes to the ...
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2answers
51 views

Is this statement combination correct?

I have two statements to make: Note that records are keyed on their name, not an integer Note that records are uniquely identified by their name, not an integer I considered combining these with ...
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0answers
43 views

Predicator vs. Predicate

BACKGROUND According to Oxford Dictionaries Online: Predicator means "(In systemic grammar) a verb phrase considered as a constituent of clause structure, along with subject, object, and ...
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65 views

what is the word to describe such an expression?

When we chat on the internet we use expressions like “Hey, it’s so good to hear from you” even though we are not speaking to or hearing each other. What is the word used to describe this kind of ...
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2answers
41 views

Another word for key-points of a certain entity

I'm looking for another word for key-points of another object/entity. Example: The most important things of football are: Teamwork Speed Condition What do you call the three things I just summed ...
3
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1answer
231 views

What is a “goon tie”?

On the first page of Nabokov's Pnin the eponymous hero's clothing is described and it includes a "flamboyant goon tie". What exactly is that?
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How do I connect my account to itself? [migrated]

http://english.stackexchange.com/users/113399/neil That is me. But then when I registered it doesn't show my other posts from that account which is supposed to be this account.
4
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2answers
85 views

Adage or epigram for something not working until someone else looks at it? [duplicate]

It's a pretty common occurrence. My code doesn't work. Why? I have no idea. So I call over a coworker to look at it, but the instant he looks at the code it is magically working. Another situation -- ...
4
votes
2answers
436 views

Milanese Loop - origin of term?

A company is using the term "Milanese Loop" for one of the watch armbands for the digital Watch. I understand that Milanese is related to the Italian city of Milan. Yet my Internet research has not ...
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2answers
108 views

Technical train terms

I am looking for the correct technical English terms for these German words like you would use them in a published paper: Bahnhof → station (We are boarding at the station) Zugstrecke → route, line, ...
2
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1answer
59 views

A bit of chicken? [closed]

I heard someone earlier today say this. 'I will cut the chicken breast into bits then fry.' I responded; 'You mean chunks?, because I would prefer strips.' That someone then said; 'Strips? ...
0
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0answers
40 views

Is there a term to refer to movies in which one or more actors died during production period and stand-ins were used?

The best I can think of is "movie with late actors", but it sounds weird and not very concise. I wonder if there's a technical term to refer to that type of movies.
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3answers
93 views

The history of the phrase, “to drop the ball.” [closed]

How (if at all) does the phrase "to drop the ball" relate to the Times Square dropping of the midnight ball on New Year's Eve? If they are unrelated, where does the phrase come from?
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What do you call a response which does not address the question?

When some one is asked a question, sometimes if they are trying to avoid answering the question, they respond with something unrelated. What is the word for that response? Eg. A: Why were you late? ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Is there a word for numbers and letters, but not punctuation, etc?

Is there a word that would refer to a number or a letter, but not any other character (like a comma or an exclamation mark)?