Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

2
votes
2answers
93 views

Is there an abbreviation to denote "f***k You?

I frequently see people using various facebook expressions in official e-mails or in general text message. What bemuses me is that most of the time ""F***K you" is written/put as "f**K you". Please ...
0
votes
3answers
54 views

Difference between “Registration” and “Enrollment”

I'm developing a scholar system which I have to support english(and others) language. This system haves an "Enrollment" proccess. I've called it as "Enrollment" after some research because I could not ...
2
votes
0answers
71 views

Terminology for words that are the same backwards and forwards, upside-down or right way up

I'm thinking of getting a SONOS sound system and have realised that it's an example of a special class of word. It's a palindrome, it's a rotational ambigram and it is also a word that is the same ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

What is a term for having a “small” name for something that's actually “large”?

For example, referring to a 7 feet tall, 450 lb man with the nickname "Tiny".
1
vote
4answers
98 views

Looking for a word for a slavery “contract”

Suppose a person is forced by law to serve a fixed time as a slave, before they are granted freedom. What would you call this arrangement? It's not a contract or an agreement, because the slave does ...
47
votes
5answers
4k views

Are there rules to determine whether a musician's title will end with “-er” or “-ist”?

There are drummers, buglers, fifers, whistlers, and fiddlers. Folks who play all the other instruments use the -ist suffix -- pianist, violinist, cellist, tympanist, guitarist, flautist, etc, etc, ad ...
-3
votes
0answers
38 views

regarding those who use paranomasia, puns, and double-entendre [closed]

geek vs. nerd should be a closed topic. Geeks are peculiar people who understand that which the non-taught person finds difficult. The term "side show geek" used to describe both sword swallowers ...
1
vote
3answers
80 views

A word to describe the type of literature read on toilet?

Is there an English word (recognised or slang) that describes the type of literature that is intended to be read in the toilet/bathroom/restroom? I've seen books in the past that seemed aimed ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

What is the term for representing whole numbers with integers instead of English words?

For example, "I am giving you the ___ form". Where I am using numeric characters e.g., 1 instead of one. I don't think canonical exactly fits here because the English version is seems to be unique as ...
1
vote
5answers
587 views

Word to describe what an academic degree is “in”

I am trying to describe the individual components of a a list of academic degrees: AS Accounting AS Marketing BA Sociology BA Economics BS Accounting/Finance BS ...
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Is there a word for “environmental needs”?

I am looking for a word that refers to the environmental needs of a species for survival (think of climatic conditions, but not necessarily restricted to climate). My native language is not English, ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

What do you call an abrupt, abstract ending to a sentence?

While reading the poem Pike by Ted Hughes, I came across this line: The gills kneading quietly, and the pectorals. As you can see, the line ends quite abruptly. How would one term this literary ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

What are the words for sets of n-grams or n-cores? [closed]

Just saw that a fellow member asked similar question about series of books, however the matter with naming series of things is more complicated in my view. Many times I need the numerals, so let us ...
2
votes
1answer
277 views

What is an indoor Dock/Harbor called?

For more clarity, I am thinking about something more like a dock, but inside a building alongside or stretching out over a pond/ocean. There would be a wooden door which could be raised and lowered to ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Term: Retrograde Translations

Let's start with an example. I asked this question over on CN@SE: Translation: “世界上,治疗心脏病最好的方式就是不要开刀。”. In the question I asked for a translation of an, apparently, well-known English quote. The ...
2
votes
3answers
90 views

Term for numbers that have at least one non-zero significant digit after the decimal point?

So, a number that is nothing but fractions is "fractional". A number that has a whole number and a fraction is "mixed", if you want to call it that. And the portion after the decimal point is called ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

A word describing how 'profound I am in a skill': Can you suggest one?

I am in the process of localizing an application and I can't wrap my head around a specific translation. The user can enter a skill / prof. experience they have acquired or a language they speak ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What is the difference between “Part of” (without 's') and “Parts of” (with 's')?

Example phrases: Part of the company is very efficient. Parts of the company are very efficient. Google search for 'parts of' has 2.5B results. 'parts of' has 650M Google search results, with ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

How should I fill “First name” and “Last name” in U.S. documents? [closed]

How should I fill this information if I have more than one given name and more than one last name? For example, if my name is Juan Eduardo González Rodríguez. I have 2 given names: "Juan" and ...
13
votes
16answers
4k views

English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?

I am looking for a word that means “a process that you keep doing, hoping that you will learn something useful, but which you actually never learn anything from”. I'm quite sure that there is an ...
2
votes
4answers
63 views

What do you call the energy that has been created by fear or happiness?

There are times that we feel tired and weak and not able to get up and do something, in this situation: if we face a danger, like our house goes on fire, or become under attack, or remember that we ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

Is there a correct techincal term used to describe a phrase or name consisting of a pair or group of homonyms; i.e., “Spring Spring?”

Is there a term to describe names or phrases consisting of two or more homonyms, such as "Spring Spring" or "Rock Rock?"
1
vote
2answers
90 views

What's the word for the when you suck snot back in your nose?

My mom and I say 'soup' like: "Why are you souping the snot back up your nose?" But I realise that this is not accurate. So what's the word?
-1
votes
2answers
53 views

Is there a special common term for the name of a film?

In the beginning of a film (or in the end) there are credits, or information about creators of the film: actors, producers, production designers and so on. The example. And among credits there is the ...
-1
votes
0answers
31 views

What's a word for something that also describes itself? [duplicate]

Is there a word for a term that also describes the term? For example, a portmanteau is also a portmanteau and a mondegreen is also a mondegreen. On the other hand, an onomatopoeia is not.
5
votes
6answers
350 views

What do you call photos of women who are naked that don't reveal the naughty bits?

In my youth magazines were often shared amongst the older boys that had been taken either from parents or from the local drugstore. These magazines often featured blonde bombshells on the covers that ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Is there any other category besides prose and verse, for classification of literature according to format?

Prose and verse are two ways of classifying types of literature, is there a third category for the classification of literature according to format? For example, in which category a graphic ...
5
votes
1answer
111 views

What is the origin of the shift of meaning of “sauté”?

As I'm dealing a lot of recipes and text on cooking written in English, I'm confronted all the time with a trend which makes understanding quite hard sometimes. The original French word "sauté" has ...
1
vote
3answers
307 views

What do you call someone who knows multiple programming languages?

Someone who knows multiple languages is called polyglot or multilingual (There can be nuances between two words also.). I'm not sure if we can apply these terms to someone who knows multiple ...
1
vote
3answers
69 views

What's the term for the information you gather from someone before deciding to bring them in for an interview?

What is another word for the information you gather from someone before deciding to bring them in for an interview? (Salary Requirements, Commuting Restrictions, etc.) What I'm trying to say is: ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

What is the word for fear of fear?

What is the word for fear of fear? I thought this would be easy to find, recall, or previously asked, but I've looked around and couldn't find it (phobia list). It is simply phobiaphobia? Or ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

sink and sing…not rhyming but what is it called for rhyming the end of two words

What is the definition of reverse rhyming of words where the last few letters of two words are different rather than the beginning letters of two rhyming words. For example: cow, cop, coy, cot, con. ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

What is the word for when people use associative words for technical terms? [closed]

Examples: the word "canned" is used for multiple items within a list "breadcrumbs" is used for specifying a part of a webpage used for navigation on the site "bootstrap" is used for start up (an ...
1
vote
2answers
78 views

Can the phrase “take it with a grain of salt” have four different ways to get to the same meaning? [duplicate]

Frequently in my workplace, when some bad news comes in, the advice take this with a grain of salt is used in such a context to mean choose for yourselves how to interpret this but don't consider it ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

What do you call the state, that when you see something or somebody or something is accruing reminds you something else even though unrelated?

Sometimes it feels like what is accruing at the present time is attached to something else, every time you hear or smell something or see something accruing reminds you the situation that you have ...
2
votes
3answers
137 views

What term is used for the programs that are educational and entertaining

Many programs on internet and TV try to attract customers by teaching through games,so what is the name of this combination?
11
votes
2answers
200 views

What's the term for not specifying race or gender when it is the majority?

In one of my English literature courses, my professor talked about how minority writers are often "marked" by a qualifier, while majority writers are unmarked. For example, Langston Hughes is often ...
-1
votes
2answers
81 views

Is there a name for a pair of words or phrase that can have a double meaning?

Is there a name for a pair of words or phrase that can have a double meaning? I was thinking homophones, but I thought that homophones are only applied to single words (ie their, there, and they're). ...
7
votes
1answer
122 views

Is there a well-known term for the synonym or near-synonym “telescoping” words?

This has been rattling around in the back of my mind for many years (way before Stack Exchange came into existence), so it's a relief to finally ask the question. There are words that can be ...
-3
votes
3answers
79 views

Is there a term for “-tive” and “-tative” word pairs ?

preventive and preventative interpretive and interpretative exploitive and exploitative authoritive and authoritative Is there a term, grammatical or not, for these pairs?
27
votes
19answers
4k views

What do you call a response which does not address the question?

When some one is asked a question, sometimes if they are trying to avoid answering the question, they respond with something unrelated. What is the word for that response? Eg. A: Why were you late? ...
4
votes
2answers
69 views

Person who is responsible for the political guests in the kingdom?

I'm from Georgia, and I need help with a specific word. In one of the history books I found the word mestumre, and in a translation from Georgian it means a person who is responsible for the special ...
-1
votes
1answer
47 views

Name for the property of a thing that allows it to be described practically infinite ways

There are things that can be described in numerous ways, but the description still means the same thing. Is there a word or phrase that encapsulates such things, or the property about the things that ...
5
votes
3answers
119 views

Word for the inability to do simple things when you don't look at it

Well, the title says it all. I'll add an example: You try to put a plug into a socket which is under the table and you're too lazy to stoop down. To my mind this sounds like a very simple task and ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

what do you call someone who marries for citizenship?

A gold digger is someone who marries for money. Is there a term for someone who marries for citizenship (and then divorces as soon as they get the citizenship)?
7
votes
1answer
95 views

When was “emoji” first used?

Emoji is a small digital image or icon used in electronic communication. It is also mentioned as a standardized emoticon (emotion + icon) but emojis are usually depicted as pictographs and emoticons ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

When did “phone” become accepted as its own word?

In older print publications, I have come across telephone shortened to 'phone, with an apostrophe to mark where the beginning of the word had been omitted. Now, however, phone does not need an ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What is it called when someone says “like” or “alright”

I was talking with my friend and neither of us could think of the word for when someone says something similar to "And, like, we were totally, like, going to do this one thing." To add to it, as ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Where did the Word 'Physics' Come From? [closed]

As the title suggests, where did the name for the discipline 'Physics' come from? - does it mean something in Greek?