A set of forms taken by a verb to indicate the time and/or completeness and continuance of the action in relation to the time of the utterance.

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6
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4answers
254 views

Present tense and conditional tense in a stated past tense

I have a question about using past and conditional tenses in a context that refers to something told in the past. I think I’ve seen both forms used in films/books, etc., but I'm not sure about it ...
2
votes
2answers
642 views

Correct verb form in two sentences

I can't explain why the following sentences are wrong, although I can correct them. (a) INCORRECT — The table shows the average amount of time advertisements on the Internet lasting. ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

Why “hadn’t gone” and not “didn’t go”?

I came across this sentence: We thought that Joe didn’t go to the museum with the rest of the class. It says it’s an incorrect construction and it should be: We thought that Joe hadn’t gone ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What tenses should be used after “in case of”?

What tense should be used after "in case" or "in case of"? For instance, is the following sentence correct? "Just imagine that in case of a dispute with her husband she leaves home."
0
votes
1answer
35 views

“I would give you all the help you needed” vs. “would need” vs. “need”

If you were ever in trouble, I would give you all the help you needed. Can you explain the tense choice for the bolded verb? How about "all the help you would need" or "all the help you need"?
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

“Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document was/is a post”

I found this in a book: Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document was a post. Shouldn't it be: Suppose we have a collection of blog posts where each document is a post. ...
-1
votes
1answer
88 views

What are the differences between “want to pass”, “want pass” and “want passing”?

Would you kindly tell me what is the difference between the followings? I want you to pass your exams so that you can come as soon as possible to be with me. I want you pass your exams so ...
5
votes
0answers
59 views

“If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be…” What does this mean?

I'm translating a book, which involves logic and quoted the sentence from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass: "If it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ...
1
vote
0answers
75 views

Past perfect example confusion

My text definition of past perfect tense tells me that it is used to refer to an action that is completed at some point in the past and before the commencement of another past action. I came across ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Difference between “What do you came for” and “What did you come for”?

I know what "What did you come for" is the Past Simple, but what is "What do you came for"? Verb "came" is a reference to the Past, but i've never seen construction like this. Is "What do you came ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

learning tenses

I was wondering if I am correct about in the following sentences as I am learning about tenses. If I buy 5,000 boxes of tea,what discount will you offer us? is this present simple for if i buy ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Question about about various uses of “to be” and correctness of their usage in my sentence

If I were the man involved, and didn't know my wife was 'pretend', I would be totally crushed when I did find out she was fake. How could I make the above statement correct? If it already is, ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Changing quote tense?

I'm trying to write a paper and I've stumbled along a problem. If I change "They are..." to "They were..." in a quotation, do I need to put square brackets as in, "They [were]..."?
0
votes
0answers
78 views

Why present simple not continuous

I have a few sentences here: A) The instructor explains the diagram to students who ask questions during the lecture. Why are "explain" and "ask" used here in present simple, and not in the ...
0
votes
0answers
262 views

past continuous tense ~ negative interrogative form

Method 1: wasn't/weren't + subject + verb(ing) + object? Method 2: was/were + subject + not + verb(ing) + object ? Which method correct in past continuous tense ~ negative interrogative form? Or ...