Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

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8
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2answers
225 views

How to decide on the type of ellipsis

I'm having some hard time deciding on the types of a few ellipses I've got to analyze. Let's consider an example such as this one: Then Rosemary came out and said that Daddy was going to jail, ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Bill reading Shakespeare and Maureen singing Schubert satisfy/satisfies me [duplicate]

Which verb form is grammatically correct here? My intuition says 'satisfy' but a textbook I'm reading says otherwise (Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. If interested, a legal copy is available ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

As will be discussed later in this comment

As will be discussed in more detail in the next section, all exchange rate regimes offer benefits as well as costs. As common as this structure is, I am having some trouble to figure out its syntax. ...
1
vote
2answers
469 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
0
votes
2answers
280 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
4
votes
4answers
110 views

Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
-1
votes
3answers
33 views

Has your turn approached vs. Is it your turn [closed]

Which one of the following is the right way to ask someone about his turn or number for an interview etc: Has your turn approached/reached? Is it your turn yet? Thanks
1
vote
2answers
60 views

What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?

The following sentence is the Modern English translation of a line from the Old English poem Judith: He (God) advanced a gracious favour to her, that she may have a steadfast faith. My question ...
3
votes
4answers
312 views

A coffee to go…( for syntax experts)

Could the infinitive phrase "to go" be a complement of the noun phrase "a coffee"?
7
votes
3answers
560 views

“Be like” usage

Of late, I have been noticing a lot of casual memes floating around, particularly on Facebook, that involve this phrase. Typical constructs could be like the following examples: B*&^%$# be ...
9
votes
1answer
98 views

Why can't you place pronouns after a phrasal verb?

Many phrasal verbs such as look up or knock out typically allow the object to be placed between the verb and proposition or to be placed afterward. For example, You can look my brother up on ...
1
vote
2answers
686 views

Use of “as well” in the middle of the sentence

I was wondering if the use of "as well" in the middle of the sentence is correct in formal English. Here is the particular sentence I am writing: I got ample opportunities to communicate with a ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

Can “masters” (plural) be used to refer to a single entity?

I was perusing the forums of a video game I play. I began reading a thread about the lore of the game, because a few things lore-wise are left pretty vague. Two individuals got into an argument about ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

'weighed in' vs 'wade in'

When someone to gives their opinion on a complex topic, is the phrase used "weighed in" or "wade in"? I thought it was the former, but I've been seeing the latter crop up more and more often. ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
6
votes
5answers
418 views

Can someone please explain the syntactic rules at work here?

I'll use an example statement that's currently being used in a radio commercial for American Family Insurance (paraphrased.) They all told me that I couldn't build my dream home by myself; but, I ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

“She left small pins in the shoes he wore to injure his feet” – is this ambiguous?

She left small pins in all the shoes he wore to injure his feet. I wrote this sentence and I thought it was fine. When I re-read it, the meaning became unclear to me. I want it to mean that she ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

Grammaticality of “if X then A. Otherwise if Y B”

I am explaining something that has the following structure if written in computer language: if X A else B However the condition X is quite subtle, and because of this I want to recall it when ...
24
votes
4answers
2k views

How do the rules of English inform understanding of one of our language's most disputed sentences?

Yes, historical context is important, but forget it for a moment. Taken at face value, what does the text mean? A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Necessary relative followed by to-infinitive … conflict of level

Recently I wanted to bitch at my staff and I wrote the following sentence: Do you want someone who has taken off their shoes to prepare your drink without washing their hands? And then it ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“Fish fish fish fish fish fish fish”: valid sentence? [closed]

I have seen that buffalo buffalo... has been posted here before. However some sites claim also that the sentence Fish fish fish fish fish fish fish. makes sense. Can someone confirm and ...
1
vote
2answers
267 views

Can I start a sentence with “Established in”? [closed]

So, I am proofreading a text which starts as follows: This is a bank established since 1900 with majority shareholding held by... I feel like it can be improved. Can I change it to: ...
14
votes
5answers
69k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Multiple things belonging to a group of people? [closed]

This phrase is coming up over and over in the paper I'm editing... basically the author is talking about the many different things all belonging to a group of people. For example (these are not the ...
0
votes
2answers
157 views

“most” vs “the most”, specifically as an adverb at the end of sentence

Which one of the following sentences is the most canonical? I know most vs the most have been explained a lot but my doubts pertain specifically which one to use at the end of a sentence. Do you ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Syntax: “But what it was I had forgotten”?

I had heard some story of her too, a critical, unpleasant story, but what it was I had forgotten long ago. This is a sentence from The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald. The clause after the but ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Number text followed by numeral in parentheses

Where I work, we commonly write out the text for numbers (specifically, numbers less than 10) followed by the numeral in parentheses. For example, Quarterly increase of four (4) thousand ...
2
votes
3answers
400 views

Do I have to repeat the same subject after “and” when introducing a new verb?

I’ve got a question about how to write this sentence with and: You don’t need and you mustn’t forget Versus: You don’t need and mustn’t forget. Which of those is well written? Is it ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Syntax of They're memories made

Nothing comparesNo worries or cares Regrets and mistakes They are memories made. Who would have known how bittersweet this would taste? These are some lines from the lyrics of "Someone Like You" ...
2
votes
4answers
122 views

What type of phrase is “I'm telling you,” when used for emphasis

Consider the following sentence: I'm telling you, I left it right there. In this sentence, the phrase "I'm telling you" is used to emphasise the truth of the clause that follows. What is the ...
2
votes
3answers
347 views

If we can fall in love, why can't we fall in anger?

Although we can look back in anger, we can't fall into it. I might argue that the phrase, to fall in love, has something to do with being helpless, of letting go and losing control. But what ...
19
votes
6answers
1k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

“how much longer do you plan on [X]ing…” [closed]

Is the above structure grammatically correct, or just sort of common, or not correct but common enough to use?
0
votes
1answer
50 views

About the construction “It is … that…”

A reviewer at a journal where I submitted an article writes: There are too many instances of the awkward construction “It is … that….” I'd be very grateful if you could explain to me why this ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
8
votes
2answers
359 views

Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Equivalent of using (s) to indicate possible plural for words using “ies” for plural? [duplicate]

If I want to write how many of something I have that uses "s" to indicate plural, I can use (s), as in "Joe had X apple(s)". But say I want to write something like "The report contains 2 entries" or ...
13
votes
4answers
2k views

'Instead of' vs 'In stead of'

Is the following sentence valid? They did this in stead of that. What is the correct usage of the phrase instead of?
2
votes
3answers
91 views

Compounds and Phrases

What is the difference between compounds and phrases? How do I know that "watch-maker" is a compound but "steel bridge" is a phrase? Does the "head" have anything to do with it (complement-head or ...
-1
votes
1answer
74 views

Is it grammatical to have duplicate 'it'?: __ it it __

Is it grammatically correct to use the word it twice in a row? When doing so, do you have to separate the two using a comma? If there are different situations please use examples. My examples: ...
5
votes
3answers
7k views

Is there a term for using a word twice in a row, but in a grammatically-appropriate way?

For example: "I could tell he had had a great time at the circus." If you're not repeating the word for emphasis, is there a term for the sequential usage, other than "coincidence"?
7
votes
3answers
971 views

Is Wayne's World's (NOT) a modern invention?

Older users of this site may recall the 'Bill & Ted' 'Wayne's World' series of movies of the early 1990s. They were mindless but fairly amusing and their eponymous characters spoke in a unique ...
5
votes
3answers
449 views

Transformation? Cleft?

I am wondering if the difference between "It is terrible." and "What it is, is it is terrible." can mostly be described in terms of transformations, grammatically. Is it a kind of cleft sentence?
0
votes
1answer
81 views

What does “spurned” modify in “I am walking out of a room to the jeers of a woman spurned”

I am walking out of a room to the jeers of a woman spurned. Which word does the past participle modify in this context? Does it mean that I was spurned while walking out of the room, or am I out ...
24
votes
4answers
5k views

Why do newspaper headlines use strange syntax rules?

Newspaper/news article headlines usually have different syntax rules, for example No copula. North Korea trip 'successful' Past events written in present. Qantas cancels flight out of frozen ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

When is it okay not to put a comma, where the rule may normally apply?

In this sentence: I will forward the log, when it is complete. Is it permissible to remove the comma? I will forward the log when it is complete. I thought sentences that are plain and can ...
0
votes
2answers
124 views

Comma required to avoid syntactical (but not semantic) ambiguity?

Consider this sentence: You may worry about the Fed raising interest rates, or a market meltdown, but these risks should not change your investment plans. Could the comma before "or" be omitted? ...
5
votes
3answers
89 views

is it “likely become” or “likely to become”?

I have recently encountered both while reading articles, can anyone clarify which one is correct?