Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

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2answers
855 views

Use of “as well” in the middle of the sentence

I was wondering if the use of "as well" in the middle of the sentence is correct in formal English. Here is the particular sentence I am writing: I got ample opportunities to communicate with a ...
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2answers
148 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
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1answer
165 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
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1answer
27 views

Help with sentence syntax and style

A. Please follow the instructions below for a sample of what the profile looks like on their official website. Please follow the instructions below for a sample of the profile as ...
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7answers
680 views

“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
4
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1answer
44 views

The correct syntactic usage of “Only”

Question #1: Which of the following sentences has the correct syntactic usage of the word "only"? Question #2: What do the remaining sentences mean? Examples: Only I gave him $1. I only ...
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2answers
28 views

I walked over to the payphone to try to call you [closed]

Does this sentence make sense? I'm just confused with all the 'to's
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3answers
53 views

Unsplitting infinitives and change of meaning

I've been watching Generative Syntax from the University of Edinburgh on youtube and in chapter 1.1 while describing prescriptivism Prof. Caroline Heycock talks about Splitting infinitives (and the ...
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2answers
456 views

How to decide on the type of ellipsis

I'm having some hard time deciding on the types of a few ellipses I've got to analyze. Let's consider an example such as this one: Then Rosemary came out and said that Daddy was going to jail, ...
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1answer
29 views

Difference between the two sentences and their usage

Why don't you join a monastery? Why do you not join a monastery? What's the difference between the two sentences and when do I use each of them?
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4answers
3k views

What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
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2answers
318 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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0answers
15 views

Looking For an Excellent Resource for People Learning Linguistics [migrated]

Was wondering if anyone knows of a solid resource (site) on the web or even an app in the play store that would be a good place to go to supplement my learning in school...i.e. someplace that has a ...
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2answers
65 views

What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?

The following sentence is the Modern English translation of a line from the Old English poem Judith: He (God) advanced a gracious favour to her, that she may have a steadfast faith. My question ...
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4answers
324 views

A coffee to go…( for syntax experts)

Could the infinitive phrase "to go" be a complement of the noun phrase "a coffee"?
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4answers
26k views

The correct syntax for “I/We remain” at the end of the letter

I want to sign off a letter with the following: Letter text. We remain, Sincerely yours, Mr Person Head of Accounting Is this correct usage? Isn’t this like having 2 ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Correct usage of 'one' [closed]

Consider the statements: 'There was one girl, XYZ, ..' 'There was one mountain, XYZ, ..' Are the sentences correct?
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1answer
25 views

Can parallelism be defined as a syntactic structure?

Can parallelism be defined as a syntactic structure? In my course, we study parallelism as an example of syntactic patterning. However, would it be ok to call it a syntactic structure?
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1answer
197 views

'weighed in' vs 'wade in'

When someone to gives their opinion on a complex topic, is the phrase used "weighed in" or "wade in"? I thought it was the former, but I've been seeing the latter crop up more and more often. ...
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18answers
3k views

Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?

In the Central Pennsylvania dialect of English (and possibly elsewhere), the following construction is possible: This car needs washed. (=needs to be washed) The room needs cleaned. (=needs ...
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0answers
25 views

“These nouns provide a different perspective on how attitudes about gender can and have played out in English.”

The cited sentence is syntactically deficient as the modal verb "can" requires the main verb construction "have played out" in addition to the one of the same form given. Thus, it should rather go: ...
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0answers
43 views

Why did English writers formerly capitalize so many words? [duplicate]

Or, I guess it could be worded, since when and why was it counted as part of a formal writing style to capitalize many general nouns? (After all, it's not German ...) This is also a trend in legal ...
3
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1answer
99 views

Bill reading Shakespeare and Maureen singing Schubert satisfy/satisfies me [duplicate]

Which verb form is grammatically correct here? My intuition says 'satisfy' but a textbook I'm reading says otherwise (Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. If interested, a legal copy is available ...
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1answer
62 views

As will be discussed later in this comment

As will be discussed in more detail in the next section, all exchange rate regimes offer benefits as well as costs. As common as this structure is, I am having some trouble to figure out its syntax. ...
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2answers
596 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
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4answers
121 views

Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
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3answers
33 views

Has your turn approached vs. Is it your turn [closed]

Which one of the following is the right way to ask someone about his turn or number for an interview etc: Has your turn approached/reached? Is it your turn yet? Thanks
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3answers
629 views

“Be like” usage

Of late, I have been noticing a lot of casual memes floating around, particularly on Facebook, that involve this phrase. Typical constructs could be like the following examples: B*&^%$# be ...
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1answer
115 views

Why can't you place pronouns after a phrasal verb?

Many phrasal verbs such as look up or knock out typically allow the object to be placed between the verb and proposition or to be placed afterward. For example, You can look my brother up on ...
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2answers
105 views

Can “masters” (plural) be used to refer to a single entity?

I was perusing the forums of a video game I play. I began reading a thread about the lore of the game, because a few things lore-wise are left pretty vague. Two individuals got into an argument about ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
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5answers
448 views

Can someone please explain the syntactic rules at work here?

I'll use an example statement that's currently being used in a radio commercial for American Family Insurance (paraphrased.) They all told me that I couldn't build my dream home by myself; but, I ...
2
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2answers
111 views

“She left small pins in the shoes he wore to injure his feet” – is this ambiguous?

She left small pins in all the shoes he wore to injure his feet. I wrote this sentence and I thought it was fine. When I re-read it, the meaning became unclear to me. I want it to mean that she ...
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1answer
78 views

Grammaticality of “if X then A. Otherwise if Y B”

I am explaining something that has the following structure if written in computer language: if X A else B However the condition X is quite subtle, and because of this I want to recall it when ...
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4answers
2k views

How do the rules of English inform understanding of one of our language's most disputed sentences?

Yes, historical context is important, but forget it for a moment. Taken at face value, what does the text mean? A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Necessary relative followed by to-infinitive … conflict of level

Recently I wanted to bitch at my staff and I wrote the following sentence: Do you want someone who has taken off their shoes to prepare your drink without washing their hands? And then it ...
3
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1answer
3k views

“Fish fish fish fish fish fish fish”: valid sentence? [closed]

I have seen that buffalo buffalo... has been posted here before. However some sites claim also that the sentence Fish fish fish fish fish fish fish. makes sense. Can someone confirm and ...
1
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2answers
291 views

Can I start a sentence with “Established in”? [closed]

So, I am proofreading a text which starts as follows: This is a bank established since 1900 with majority shareholding held by... I feel like it can be improved. Can I change it to: ...
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5answers
72k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
0
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1answer
100 views

Multiple things belonging to a group of people? [closed]

This phrase is coming up over and over in the paper I'm editing... basically the author is talking about the many different things all belonging to a group of people. For example (these are not the ...
0
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2answers
210 views

“most” vs “the most”, specifically as an adverb at the end of sentence

Which one of the following sentences is the most canonical? I know most vs the most have been explained a lot but my doubts pertain specifically which one to use at the end of a sentence. Do you ...
0
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1answer
102 views

Syntax: “But what it was I had forgotten”?

I had heard some story of her too, a critical, unpleasant story, but what it was I had forgotten long ago. This is a sentence from The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald. The clause after the but ...
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0answers
61 views

Number text followed by numeral in parentheses

Where I work, we commonly write out the text for numbers (specifically, numbers less than 10) followed by the numeral in parentheses. For example, Quarterly increase of four (4) thousand ...
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3answers
520 views

Do I have to repeat the same subject after “and” when introducing a new verb?

I’ve got a question about how to write this sentence with and: You don’t need and you mustn’t forget Versus: You don’t need and mustn’t forget. Which of those is well written? Is it ...
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1answer
76 views

Syntax of They're memories made

Nothing comparesNo worries or cares Regrets and mistakes They are memories made. Who would have known how bittersweet this would taste? These are some lines from the lyrics of "Someone Like You" ...
2
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4answers
129 views

What type of phrase is “I'm telling you,” when used for emphasis

Consider the following sentence: I'm telling you, I left it right there. In this sentence, the phrase "I'm telling you" is used to emphasise the truth of the clause that follows. What is the ...
2
votes
3answers
369 views

If we can fall in love, why can't we fall in anger?

Although we can look back in anger, we can't fall into it. I might argue that the phrase, to fall in love, has something to do with being helpless, of letting go and losing control. But what ...
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6answers
2k views

How can I prove a word is a noun?

When I read a sentence, I can identify nouns. But now I need to give proof that they are indeed nouns, and that is where it goes wrong. I can think of one or two things sometimes (like combining it ...
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1answer
52 views

“how much longer do you plan on [X]ing…” [closed]

Is the above structure grammatically correct, or just sort of common, or not correct but common enough to use?
0
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1answer
54 views

About the construction “It is … that…”

A reviewer at a journal where I submitted an article writes: There are too many instances of the awkward construction “It is … that….” I'd be very grateful if you could explain to me why this ...