Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

learn more… | top users | synonyms

4
votes
1answer
40 views

What is the equivalent in English of the French sentence part “complément de phrase”?

In French, a sentence has two essential syntactic parts (the subject and the predicate) and may have one or more "complément de phrase", which are optional parts. "complément de phrase" = "sentence ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Which is better: related more or more related

It actually related more to his genetics than his behavior. or It actually was more related to his genetics than his behavior.
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Syntax of “It seemed to be a person”

How do you you parse this sentence? Here's my attempt: subj: It verb: seemed comp: to be a man (infinitive) is the whole infinitive phrase the complement or is "a man" the complement, and "to be" ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

It is possible + infinitive

It is not possible to keep abreast of the normal tides of acquisition. (Source) Can someone analyze this sentence? My first thought was that the infinitive 'to keep' modifies possible, but then ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Syntax of phrase “The word cancer”

"On one of the mornings of disposal, a man from a second-hand bookstore visited us, bought several hundred books, and told us of the death of his brother, the word cancer exploding in the living ...
13
votes
1answer
640 views

How to decide on the type of ellipsis

I'm having some hard time deciding on the types of a few ellipses I've got to analyze. Let's consider an example such as this one: Then Rosemary came out and said that Daddy was going to jail, ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

The syntax of “ put somebody to something”

My wife, a strategist, knew better and began quietly mobilizing the forces that would eventually put our goods to rout My question is about the syntax of the subordinate clause. subj: that ...
3
votes
5answers
355 views

A coffee to go…( for syntax experts)

Could the infinitive phrase "to go" be a complement of the noun phrase "a coffee"?
0
votes
2answers
343 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

“ I kept hoping that…”

In this sentence, is "hoping" a gerund functioning as the object of kept or a participle modifying the subject?
4
votes
2answers
156 views

Adverbial phrase

What is an adverbial phrase ? I recently learnt 'to boot' , meaning in addition, as well. And someone was saying it is an adverbial phrase. I think I know what is an adverb, but never learnt of ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Use-case of `as less as possible` [closed]

Are following two usages both valid and have same meaning? Use tools as less as possible. Use as less tools as possible. Thanks.
1
vote
2answers
75 views

What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?

The following sentence is the Modern English translation of a line from the Old English poem Judith: He (God) advanced a gracious favour to her, that she may have a steadfast faith. My question ...
-1
votes
1answer
39 views

Why can't you use the word me before a proper noun

As per the title, i dont understand why it is grammatically incorrect to say "me and John went to the park" as opposed to "John and I went to the park" looking for any help on this available
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Correct order of representing information

I've been writing a research and I've come across this silly question. In the following sentence Network investigation is a general term that consists of many subpractices, of which analysis of data ...
7
votes
4answers
8k views

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it'?

Is it incorrect to say, 'Give me it' ? I am told that it is and one should always say, 'Give it me'?
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Can parallelism be defined as a syntactic structure?

Can parallelism be defined as a syntactic structure? In my course, we study parallelism as an example of syntactic patterning. However, would it be ok to call it a syntactic structure?
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Help with sentence syntax and style

A. Please follow the instructions below for a sample of what the profile looks like on their official website. Please follow the instructions below for a sample of the profile as ...
2
votes
4answers
71 views

Unsplitting infinitives and change of meaning

I've been watching Generative Syntax from the University of Edinburgh on youtube and in chapter 1.1 while describing prescriptivism Prof. Caroline Heycock talks about Splitting infinitives (and the ...
1
vote
1answer
849 views

What's the difference between - and — in a phrase? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use an em-dash, an en-dash, and a hyphen? When do I put a - in a sentence? Is it a more powerful comma? With a bigger pause?
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Is the writer of this line trying to shorten “time-saving and labor-saving” into “time- and labor-saving”?

Here's the paragraph is question below. The part I'm talking about is in bold. Festool has a reputation for producing expensive tools that provide benefits the other brands either lack or end ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Use of “as well” in the middle of the sentence

I was wondering if the use of "as well" in the middle of the sentence is correct in formal English. Here is the particular sentence I am writing: I got ample opportunities to communicate with a ...
1
vote
2answers
155 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
0
votes
1answer
206 views

Would it be 'meet' or 'have met' in this structure?

If I bumped into someone, who happened to be called John, yesterday, and I am telling someone else of the encounter, would I say: I happened to meet John yesterday. or I happened to have ...
7
votes
7answers
714 views

“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
4
votes
1answer
44 views

The correct syntactic usage of “Only”

Question #1: Which of the following sentences has the correct syntactic usage of the word "only"? Question #2: What do the remaining sentences mean? Examples: Only I gave him $1. I only ...
0
votes
2answers
29 views

I walked over to the payphone to try to call you [closed]

Does this sentence make sense? I'm just confused with all the 'to's
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Difference between the two sentences and their usage

Why don't you join a monastery? Why do you not join a monastery? What's the difference between the two sentences and when do I use each of them?
21
votes
4answers
3k views

What rules make “Remember me, who am your friend” grammatical?

An acquaintance recalled this specific example from an English textbook, but it is jarring to my native ear. Is this an example of prescriptive grammarians gone wild?
3
votes
4answers
27k views

The correct syntax for “I/We remain” at the end of the letter

I want to sign off a letter with the following: Letter text. We remain, Sincerely yours, Mr Person Head of Accounting Is this correct usage? Isn’t this like having 2 ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Correct usage of 'one' [closed]

Consider the statements: 'There was one girl, XYZ, ..' 'There was one mountain, XYZ, ..' Are the sentences correct?
0
votes
1answer
266 views

'weighed in' vs 'wade in'

When someone to gives their opinion on a complex topic, is the phrase used "weighed in" or "wade in"? I thought it was the former, but I've been seeing the latter crop up more and more often. ...
54
votes
18answers
3k views

Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?

In the Central Pennsylvania dialect of English (and possibly elsewhere), the following construction is possible: This car needs washed. (=needs to be washed) The room needs cleaned. (=needs ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

“These nouns provide a different perspective on how attitudes about gender can and have played out in English.”

The cited sentence is syntactically deficient as the modal verb "can" requires the main verb construction "have played out" in addition to the one of the same form given. Thus, it should rather go: ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Why did English writers formerly capitalize so many words? [duplicate]

Or, I guess it could be worded, since when and why was it counted as part of a formal writing style to capitalize many general nouns? (After all, it's not German ...) This is also a trend in legal ...
3
votes
1answer
101 views

Bill reading Shakespeare and Maureen singing Schubert satisfy/satisfies me [duplicate]

Which verb form is grammatically correct here? My intuition says 'satisfy' but a textbook I'm reading says otherwise (Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. If interested, a legal copy is available ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

As will be discussed later in this comment

As will be discussed in more detail in the next section, all exchange rate regimes offer benefits as well as costs. As common as this structure is, I am having some trouble to figure out its syntax. ...
1
vote
2answers
730 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
5
votes
4answers
132 views

Meaning of “And the day came when … ”

I saw some sentences that start with this phrase: "And the day came when ... " For example, the following sentence form The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield At last the day ...
-1
votes
3answers
36 views

Has your turn approached vs. Is it your turn [closed]

Which one of the following is the right way to ask someone about his turn or number for an interview etc: Has your turn approached/reached? Is it your turn yet? Thanks
7
votes
3answers
692 views

“Be like” usage

Of late, I have been noticing a lot of casual memes floating around, particularly on Facebook, that involve this phrase. Typical constructs could be like the following examples: B*&^%$# be ...
9
votes
1answer
123 views

Why can't you place pronouns after a phrasal verb?

Many phrasal verbs such as look up or knock out typically allow the object to be placed between the verb and proposition or to be placed afterward. For example, You can look my brother up on ...
1
vote
2answers
111 views

Can “masters” (plural) be used to refer to a single entity?

I was perusing the forums of a video game I play. I began reading a thread about the lore of the game, because a few things lore-wise are left pretty vague. Two individuals got into an argument about ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
6
votes
5answers
474 views

Can someone please explain the syntactic rules at work here?

I'll use an example statement that's currently being used in a radio commercial for American Family Insurance (paraphrased.) They all told me that I couldn't build my dream home by myself; but, I ...
2
votes
2answers
113 views

“She left small pins in the shoes he wore to injure his feet” – is this ambiguous?

She left small pins in all the shoes he wore to injure his feet. I wrote this sentence and I thought it was fine. When I re-read it, the meaning became unclear to me. I want it to mean that she ...
-1
votes
1answer
86 views

Grammaticality of “if X then A. Otherwise if Y B”

I am explaining something that has the following structure if written in computer language: if X A else B However the condition X is quite subtle, and because of this I want to recall it when ...
25
votes
4answers
2k views

How do the rules of English inform understanding of one of our language's most disputed sentences?

Yes, historical context is important, but forget it for a moment. Taken at face value, what does the text mean? A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Necessary relative followed by to-infinitive … conflict of level

Recently I wanted to bitch at my staff and I wrote the following sentence: Do you want someone who has taken off their shoes to prepare your drink without washing their hands? And then it ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“Fish fish fish fish fish fish fish”: valid sentence? [closed]

I have seen that buffalo buffalo... has been posted here before. However some sites claim also that the sentence Fish fish fish fish fish fish fish. makes sense. Can someone confirm and ...