Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

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Ellipsis in noun phrases with possessive case [closed]

Can you omit the second occurrence of the word "poems" in a sentence like the following? I like Lord Byron's poems, and also enjoy a number of Percy Shelley's [poems].
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2answers
422 views

'I have no idea why do I like him so much' or 'I have no idea why I like him so much'

As far as my knowledge goes, 'why' in this case functions as a relative pronoun introducing a clause. I am just unsure whether it is grammatically accurate or at least acceptable to phrase the second ...
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1answer
152 views

“Keith does not a hint take” or “A hint does Keith not take”

While wasting time on the internet (as I am wont to do), I came across a video in which somebody was criticizing a blog-post and corrected the statement *Keith does not a hint take. supplying his ...
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3answers
301 views

What is the section in a business card that shows home contact details called?

On my business card I have the contact details of my office, however I want to include the contact details of my home. I want to make it known that the above details are my home's. How can I write ...
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3answers
93 views

30 v. the 30. Which would be more correct? [duplicate]

Would it be proper to say "I take the 30 to work" (meaning the I-30 freeway) rather than saying "I take 30 to work"?
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2answers
292 views

Absolute phrase without a participle? Or something else?

I'm trying to learn how to break apart sentences and understand each part's name and what exactly it does (excuse my ignorance; I've read quite a bit, but I'm still new at it). I came across the ...
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3answers
1k views

Is it ever correct to use “end” after the name of a month?

I’ve heard some people say things like September end or June end when I’m used to hearing the end of September or the end of June. Is the former usage (meaning, the “something end” collocation) ...
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1answer
3k views

What's the difference between “a year”, “per year” and “out of a year”?

Suppose I want to say that I'm at sea seven months out of twelve. (Just an example.) I think I can say "I'm at sea 7 months a year" or "I'm at sea 7 months per year" or "I'm at sea 7 ...
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2answers
243 views

Fashion color matching or fashion matching colors

I am working on an app that gives suggestions on how to match colors for your clothes and I am looking for a tagline for the app. Which is better? "Fashion color matching" or "Fashion matching ...
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1answer
305 views

Position of adverbial phrase [duplicate]

Is there a difference in these two sentences, and if so, what is the difference? Immediately afterwards I remembered having met her. I remembered having met her immediately afterwards. I think ...
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2answers
185 views

What is the term for lowercase i as word in sentence

If i have this sentence. i also have this sentence. Then correct it to: If I have this sentence. I also have this sentence. If we know the error is not a typo. What would such a correction be ...
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1answer
279 views

Using the word “Default”

I am a computer programmer and I come across the word "default" a lot, usually a statement would say: Default A to B, and I understand it as follows: A has the value B by default is this a correct ...
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1answer
3k views

Is this sentence right correct “What I want to do is read this book.”?

"What I want to do is read this book." Is it correct? Or, can I say: "What I want to do is to read this book." "What I want to do is reading this book." Are all of the three sentences correct?
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1answer
44k views

Is it correct to start a sentence with “with” in English?

Is it correct to use with at the beginning of a sentence? Here's an example sentence: With the development of the economy, living standards improved. To my eyes this looks unnatural; I would ...
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1answer
339 views

Syntax tree of a sentence

How would you draw the syntax tree of the sentence below? She arrived at quarter past two My doubts are especially about at quarter past two.
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3answers
5k views

When is “here” an adverb or a noun?

In the sentence "I hope you are all paying attention, here is a sentence I made earlier", is here an adverb or a noun? I think it is a noun, but if I substitute a noun or a pronoun for here, the ...
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2answers
329 views

Can a dependent clause undergo inversion in English?

The grammars I've seen state that dependent clauses never undergo inversion. This agrees with sentences like Tell me where he is. But how sentences like Tell me, where is he? should be ...
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3answers
400 views

Whoever had the lice, they're dead now

This sentence is from South Park. There was a lice problem in the school and the children demand that their teacher Mrs. Garrison tell them who exactly had the lice. She says that it's not important ...
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1answer
90 views

Who would say “letters of love” as opposed to “love letters”?

From what part of the world would a person refer to love letters as letters of love?
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1answer
626 views

Need we use “sums” in sentences whenever they describe the sum of plural objects? [duplicate]

Need we use sums in the case that the sentence describes the sum of plural objects? For example, “100 centimeters sums to one meter” versus “100 centimeters sum to one meter”. They both seem make ...
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1answer
1k views

Non verbal predicates in English

Is a non-verbal predicate a synonymous term for "nominal predicate"? And moreover, do non-verbal predicates only appear with linking verbs or can also appear in other types of constructions? I ...
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2answers
2k views

“to further assist [you]” — Split infinitive or fixed VP?

From a descriptive standpoint (and the problem that English has at least two words in an infinitive), I understand why the split infinitive is becoming more acceptable, but is there any other excuse ...
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3answers
429 views

should one invert syntax for the verb “do” in a comparison?

Which sounds better: When Canadians do initiate conversations, they tend to be more reserved than Americans do. When Canadians do initiate conversations, they tend to be more reserved than do ...
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3answers
285 views

“Recommend considering upgrading” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “I have been keeping ignoring you.” The following sentence sounds odd to me, however I cannot think of any rules that would make its syntax incorrect: "I would ...
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2answers
875 views

Longer than a word — smaller than a sentence

What would you call a linguistic construct that is just big enough to convey a meaning within a context, longer than a word but not having the length and proper form of a complete sentence? Like, for ...
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4answers
605 views

Analysing clause elements and their function

I have a problem analysing this sentence from the point of finite/nonfinite clauses, clause elements and their functions: He does not want to destroy his parents' dream of him achieving a ...
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1answer
149 views

Is this 'as' a conjunction?

I guess ‘as’ is a conjunction. If then, is as-clause an adjective clause that modifies ‘Muggle money’? There was a train to London in five minutes' time. Hagrid, who didn't understand 'Muggle ...
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2answers
474 views

Is this the structure of verb + object + adverbial phrase? [closed]

In ‘point new Gryffindors in the right direction ‘, is this the structure of verb + indirect object + direct object, or verb + object + adverbial phrase? As a Korean, I’m easier to accept the former ...
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3answers
422 views

Sentence with two not-so-related parts

Quite a lot of articles in Wikipedia, especially about people, have sentences like this one: Author of Gitanjali and its "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse", he became the first ...
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3answers
1k views

Use of prepositions in strings of conjunctions

When one wants to list various cases/classes/categories/types of objects in a string of conjunctions, is it preferable (or even mandatory) to keep on using (the same) preposition in front of each one ...
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1answer
144 views

Is this an absolute phrase?

In the following example, is more full picture a kind of absolute phrase? He has given us a lot, more full picture of dinosaurs of the East Coast.
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1answer
256 views

When to put a verb ahead of its doer?

I have read this at the Science.com, and it's in the second line of the last paragraph. A bow and arrow or an atlatl allows users to attack prey—and enemies—from a safer distance than does an ...
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1answer
509 views

Is 'their way' having the function of adverbial phrase?

It was a nice feeling, sitting there with Ron, eating their way through all Harry’s pasties, cakes, and candies (the sandwiches lay forgotten). In this sentence, what's the meaning of 'their ...
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4answers
709 views

How much not better than average is enough?

This is adapted from a silly conversation I had about a baseball player. It set me wondering how to describe this sort of wordplay linguistically. HIM: Do we leave Jay in center? HER: He's ...
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1answer
8k views

Symbol, punctuation, or abbreviation that indicates a “paraphrase”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the proper use of [square brackets] in quotes? This question is born of practical necessity - one that I encountered while quoting a reference in "another" Stack ...
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1answer
4k views

Why is “being ” used in this sentence “it being a rainy day” as a present participle?

The following sentence is somewhat confusing. It being a rainy day, we had to abandon (or simply say cancel) the match. or Being a rainy day, we had to abandon the match. I think one of ...
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5answers
1k views

What is going on in this sentence?

I was helping my brother study for the SAT, and we came across this sentence: While it was different from all the other classes he had taken, Eric was unhappy with his psychology class. The ...
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2answers
727 views

Reason for Subject-Verb Inversion: Only in cases where A is B, shall the Company do X [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Sentences using: [something] + have + they subject-auxiliary inversions not associated with questions In the following, why does subject-verb inversion occur? Is it ...
2
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0answers
534 views

Syntax, contrastive analysis [closed]

Could anyone help me with this question? What are the main types of contrast involved in contrastive analysis of syntax? Give examples. I tried to find answer, but unfortunately I find nothing.
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0answers
1k views

Why do BBC News use so many 'quotes' in headlines [closed]

I have noticed a that the BBC News website seems to use quotes in their headlines in places where I can see no reason to do so. Take the following story: Julius Malema: South Africa issues 'arrest ...
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6answers
9k views

Russian speakers and “I feel myself to be …”

I was told that it is a typical mistake for Russian speakers to say I feel myself badly instead of I feel ill. I wonder to what extent such constructs sound wrong to native speakers? I feel ...
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2answers
1k views

“What is that?” vs “What is it?” [closed]

When describing my product (actually a computer system) in a presentation, what way is best (most understandable or natural) for writing the heading of the introductory slide, where “XYZ” stands for ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Adverb position in perfect tenses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence? My question concerns the adverb position in perfect tenses. For example look at these ...
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3answers
545 views

What type of clause is this?

Can anyone say what type of clause this is — noun, adjective or adverbial? I am glad that you have passed the test. Some people say that it is a noun clause. But I am not sure. What is the ...
3
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2answers
455 views

Wrong usage of “myself ”, or just putting emphasis on “me”?

I was writing the following sentence, and I realized it somehow sounds odd: I am constantly trying to remind myself to think carefully before speaking, but those moments I forget to do so end up ...
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5answers
273 views

Still More Syntactic Confusion [closed]

I sometimes encounter sentences like this Mussolini ordered the Italy invaded Albania. It seems incorrect to me but I want native speakers to prove. UPDATE. The sentence above is taken from ...
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3answers
1k views

At/For a Distance Of

Somebody asked me about the usage of the word distance in a sentence. I have my own ideas about it, particularly the difference between at a distance of and for a distance of. Unfortunately, I’m ...
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2answers
85 views

“Foos are menace” vs. “Foos are a menace”

One of my friends has this in one of his E-mail signatures: «"Kosher" Cellphones (cellphones with blocked SMS, video and Internet) are menace to the deaf. They must be outlawed!». Is this sentence ...
2
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2answers
440 views

Dangling Participial Phrase [closed]

Here’s the original: The veterinarian was caught off guard when, regaining consciousness, we were again attacked by the cat. My rewrite of this sentence is either: The veterinarian was ...
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3answers
4k views

How to Identify a Rhetorical Question?

I am familiar with the idea of a rhetorical question, but are there any criteria to mark or identify one? Can a rhetorical question be recognized alone or does it need surrounding context? It ...