Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

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2
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2answers
42 views

Yes, this is she. Who's calling? [duplicate]

I've read in a book that I should "use the subjective case if the pronoun is the complement of the linking verb to be". That is the following sentences are correct: They believed that the thief was ...
-2
votes
1answer
72 views

“Let it will be” [on hold]

"Let it be" is an easy phrase to understand and to use. It's widely used and it's a set phrase, so it's hard to make mistake here. Why would a native speaker say "Let it will be"? Is it the same ...
11
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5answers
1k views

Till death do WE part

I understand the meaning of "till death do us part". I even understood why do is not does. However, in the song Love Spent by Madonna, the following lyrics occur: You played with my heart Till ...
7
votes
4answers
652 views

Is “to” missing in the following phrase: “civil liberties be damned”?

I am currently reading a column by Thomas L. Friedman titled "We're always still Americans," published on December 11, 2014 in International New York Times. If there had been another 9/11 after ...
7
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3answers
361 views

“Be like” usage

Of late, I have been noticing a lot of casual memes floating around, particularly on Facebook, that involve this phrase. Typical constructs could be like the following examples: B*&^%$# be ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Use of the 'being' formulation [closed]

Is this sentence correct ? If not, what would be the correct formulation ? Being designed for « Best-effort » encoding (low slack time), DVFS is therefore hard to apply on this type of components ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

auxiliaries before homogeneous members of the sentence

Is it possible to omit the second auxiliary in this sentence: "She has followed our advice and (has) started..." P.S. I have always thought it is as the verbs to follow and to start refer to one and ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Time and “look back on” as a phrasal verb

When using this tri-part phrasal verb, i.e., "look back on," what is the length of time it refers to or can refer to? For example, it's common to say: "When John looks back on his childhood, he can ...
2
votes
2answers
48 views

Treat similarly named patches equally: is this correct English?

I'm a software engineer wanting to use a short but clear text like the following as a selectable option. Treat similarly named patches equally Should I should use -ly with both of similarly and ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

“Pending approval” or “Approval pending”

I'm not a native english speaker so there are still some things that I don't fully understand. What is the best way to say, in a software, that an item is waiting for the approval of someone? ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Definite article before an abstract noun

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? In particular, I have the following examples. Which are correct? Case I In the Theorem 4.4, we prove property A for all ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Is the following sentence correct? “keep standing for a long time causes to blood pressure TO BE low.” [migrated]

Should I need to use the word "TO", or maybe I can say "Keep standing for a long time causes to blood pressure BE low."
0
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3answers
56 views

The structure of the following sentence: “Why may standing up for a long time cause hypotension?” [closed]

Is the structure of this sentence "Why may standing up for a long time cause hypotension?" correct?
1
vote
1answer
110 views

“Don't fall in anger”, I heard you say

If the phrase rang a bell, it's because the actual Oasis song lyric is "Don't look back in anger", I heard you say. But did my question title sound very strange or only slightly off? I might argue ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Dusty new or not

Here's a passage from Cormac McCarthy's "Blood Meridian", where I'm not sure about the meaning of the part "..dusty new or not" : “They traded the mule accoutred as it was for a Texas stock ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

What's the correct preposition to use when describing the aspect ratio of a screen?

I'm referring specifically to aspect ratios of TV screens. A common aspect ratio of a TV screen is 16:9. Would this be pronounced "sixteen to nine" or "sixteen by nine"?
1
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4answers
99 views

Difference between “Talk to me” and “Tell me”

Is there any difference between the usage of those two expressions in a conversation? Thanks in advance.
1
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2answers
88 views

Asking whether one has been in this company for a very long time?

Is it right to say: 1) Have you been working with this company for a very long time? 2) Have you been with this company for a very long time? Or are there better ways of asking? Extra: How about ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Full stop or colon to describe a number of choices? [closed]

Which example is better? There are three reasons for this: One, two, finally. There are three reasons for this. One, two, finally.
2
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5answers
393 views

What is the best Bible translation by which I can speak proper English if I read it enough times? [closed]

Since over one month I'm reading in over eight different Bible translations in order to find out whose English language is most adapted for today's English language, including grammar, idioms and ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Should I use “a” or “an” prior to an abbreviation? [duplicate]

For example, non-conformance is abbreviated as NC. If I am referring to a non-conformance, I may pronounce the whole word or I may literally say the letters "NC"; in my industry, they are used ...
2
votes
2answers
65 views

What type of phrase is “I'm telling you,” when used for emphasis

Consider the following sentence: I'm telling you, I left it right there. In this sentence, the phrase "I'm telling you" is used to emphasise the truth of the clause that follows. What is the ...
2
votes
5answers
290 views

“There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?

To me, man is the subject and it has two verbs — was and known —, making there a complement. My teacher argued that the verb is "was known".
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Obligatory punctuation for independent clauses as parts of a noun phrase?

Consider the following sentence: I remember the time I pushed John and he fell over. Is that sentence correctly punctuated as written? I ask because it has no commas. As I understand it, the ...
0
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0answers
32 views

parts of the sentence(syntax) [duplicate]

could you be so kind and tell me which and where parts of sentence are in sentences like this? (by parts of sentence i mean attribute, subject, predicate, object, etc) It was a bright room and I ...
0
votes
2answers
534 views

“In the next years to come” or “In the years to come”

I want to write a sentence saying that I hope that something will still happen in the following years. Which is the best way to write it ? I would like to keep doing that in the years to come. OR ...
3
votes
2answers
120 views

English words that are both nouns and “connectors”?

I am trying to solve a word puzzle that contains several sentences, two of which are presented below, and I have to figure out the missing words represented by the variables W1–W3: There is a W1 ...
5
votes
2answers
329 views

Transformation? Cleft?

I am wondering if the difference between "It is terrible." and "What it is, is it is terrible." can mostly be described in terms of transformations, grammatically. Is it a kind of cleft sentence?
1
vote
2answers
128 views

“had initially” or “initially had”

As in "I initially had planned to cite my sources" vs. "I had initially planned to cite my sources"
0
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2answers
136 views

Can I start a sentence with “Established in”? [closed]

So, I am proofreading a text which starts as follows: This is a bank established since 1900 with majority shareholding held by... and I feel like it can be improved. Can I change it to: ...
0
votes
2answers
503 views

Do I need to use a comma before “everyone” to set off the vocative? [duplicate]

While I was writing a status update today on social media I decided to do some grammar-learning. The status update was "Happy Labor Day everyone!" and I am now wondering if I should place a comma ...
2
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2answers
184 views

A coffee to go…( for syntax experts)

Could the infinitive phrase "to go" be a complement of the noun phrase "a coffee"?
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [closed]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

My and my brother's education… ? [duplicate]

I am not convinced with this sentence somehow. " My Dad focused on my and my brother's education" It doesn't sound right to me. How can I write it in a better way?
0
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0answers
30 views

Difference between 'we both have' and 'we have both' [duplicate]

What would be the difference in meaning between the phrase "We have both noticed a change in your demeanor." and the phrase "We both have noticed a change in your demeanor."?
0
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1answer
118 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
2
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2answers
38 views

Synonyms for 'Registration close date'

I'm managing an online registration to some conferences. The conference coordinator has to add info about that in an online form, when submitting his conference to the registration website. Is there ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Correct order of representing information

I've been writing a research and I've come across this silly question. In the below sentence "Network investigation" is a general term that consists of many sub practices of which analysis of data is ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Questions becoming statements [duplicate]

Sometimes there is an interesting effect when you convert a question into a statement, though this does seem somewhat modern. For example, What the heck. as opposed to What the heck? or ...
0
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0answers
100 views

Sentence diagramming trouble with figuring out subordinators and relative pronouns

http://imgur.com/a/dyALV for the pictures. In the diagrams my main concern was figuring out if the use of "that" was under the context of it being a relative pronoun or a subordinator. I have trouble ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

Trying to figure out proper form of “that” in sentence

I currently have the sentence "Seahorses are the only fish that practice steadfast monogamy." to tree diagram for class, and cannot freakin' figure out what the word "that" would be used as in this ...
0
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2answers
89 views

Use of the word “panic-stricken” for self

which would be the correct use of the word "panic-stricken" in the two sentences below: I was panic-stricken at the thought of missing my trip to usa OR I got panic-stricken at the thought ...
1
vote
1answer
253 views

When to use “pending” vs. “impending” [duplicate]

Although someone has previously answered a question as to the difference between "pending" and impending", I'm still struggling on when to use which word, and if one is preferred in a more formal ...
7
votes
4answers
367 views

What does a restrictive ‘as’ clause modify?

We discussed socialism as allowed by law. A learner on ELL asked whether it is “socialism or the discussion itself” which is allowed by law. I responded that the phrase could only be understood ...
3
votes
2answers
160 views

Are the phrases “both in water and land” and “for the loss and damage to” grammatical?

I have asked this question in linguistics forum, but as I was not getting answers I decided to ask it here. A. Consider the phrase that is boldfaced in sentence (1): (1) "It can live both in water ...
1
vote
2answers
299 views

The use of “So X as to Y”

First of all, note that this is not a duplicate question of another one asking about the usage of so as to, since this one is asking about the structure of so . . . as to. . . . I understand this ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

Should a translated quote be delimited by double quotes?

My understanding is that all quotes must be delimited by double quotes, and that a quote must be exactly what was said. This raises the problem of how to handle quotes made in a foreign language. My ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Does the negative enhance the sentence?

When saying, for example, "Isn't that your mother?" versus "Is that your mother?" Is the former sentence more effective because of the negative?
0
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2answers
75 views

I'm just here to help is all

I came across the following sentence in an American novel: "Hey, sugar," he says. "I'm just here to help you is all." I take it that the sentence means, "I'm just here to help you and that's ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Do you think these sentences are acceptable?

I'm a graduate student who studies linguistics in South Korea. Now, I'm writing a final term paper about 'Sluicing' which is a kind of an ellipsis structure in English. However, I lack in English ...