Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

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2
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1answer
25 views

This is [adj] is what this is

I guess I've just heard something like This is humiliating beyond belief is what this is on Larry David's "Curb Your Enthusiasm" [s03e05, around 17 min. mark]. Can anyone analyze the structure for me? ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Syntactic and semantic differences

Kindly help with explaining if the phrase "love you always" is preferable to "always love you". Is there any grammatical/idiomatic difference between the two phrases? Do both the phrases have the same ...
0
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2answers
31 views

Subject + verb inversion

I have come across, more and more frequently, that writers move the verb forward in sentences like: Today some English teachers attend to grammatical niceties in a more analytical way than did their ...
-2
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0answers
23 views

English syntactic phenomena

I am doing exploratory research in written-English syntactic constructs that show variability. Is there any list of known linguistic syntactic phenomena? For example, I am familiar with the dative ...
0
votes
2answers
29 views

'which is' or 'one is' [closed]

I have sentence. Algorithm is classified as a probabilistic algorithms, which is used for solving [name of problem] problems. Can I say: "Algorithm is classified as a probabilistic algorithms. ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Use-case of `as less as possible` [closed]

Are following two usages are both valid and have same meaning? Use tools as less as possible. Use as less tools as possible. Thanks.
1
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3answers
80 views

Sufficient or sufficiently?

When we compare this with his [Milton's] later prose writings, when he moved closer to the victorious Cromwellian ascendancy, we find that pragmatism usurped idealism, not completely but ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Necessary and unnecessary articles for proper nouns

In AmE (and probably other dialects as well) there are certain place names and other proper nouns that either have a compulsory definite article or a compulsory lack of one attached to them. For ...
5
votes
5answers
297 views

“Love me tender”: adverb or adjective?

Is the last word in each of these phrases an adverb or an adjective? How can we know? love me tender treat me nice hold me tight
0
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2answers
72 views

Difference between “focus” and “focus on” in “My main focus is Spanish.”

This question is originally posted on WordReference forum. My friend suggested me to post here to get more opinions on this question. I don't know if I am allowed to link to other site, so I am going ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Nonstandard English Syntax [duplicate]

What would be the best way to describe the non-standard syntax of "The spider he was confused."?
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Complements and adjuncts

Paul Austen’s novel sold immediately to the author’s eager readers. In the above sentence, which part is the complement and which is the adjunct? I am confused as to whether the adjunct should be ...
4
votes
3answers
186 views

You yourself - double pronoun

You have made it up yourself. This is obviously ok. But if the pronoun it should be repalced by a long noun-phrase: You have made up the illusory world in which you move yourself. It would ...
2
votes
2answers
120 views

Should “which percentage” or “what percentage” be used within a sentence?

I have the following paragraph: "The contents of a fish tank with 70 fish, of which 10 percent are goldfish, are added to another fish tank with 130 fish, of which 20 percent are goldfish. After the ...
-3
votes
1answer
51 views

Is it grammatical to have duplicate 'it'?: __ it it __

Is it grammatically correct to use the word it twice in a row? When doing so, do you have to separate the two using a comma? If there are different situations please use examples. My examples: ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

How to avoid a preposition at the end of a relative clause

In this example: I am adverting to (noun, eg letter), the reception of which I am asking/tentative about. How can I recast this sentence, and preserve this syntax, without the "empty ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Would it be correct to say: The first few years of a child's life play a key role in their development

The first few years of a child's life play a key role in their development. or should it be The first few years of children's lives play a key role in their development.
1
vote
2answers
44 views

“Were you” or “You were”

In a sentence like the following: You want to know how long you were unavailable. Should I write "you were" or "were you"? Second version (with "were you") is: You want to know how long were ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

“From the above analysis, we can see that” VS “From the analysis above, we can see that” [duplicate]

What is the difference between this two sentences? I looked into the google,and found that these two sentences are used.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is this correct syntax: [duplicate]

the girls' nose or the girls' noses? We are talking about the nose of many girls.
0
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3answers
85 views

A question on this common sentence structure

I saw these lines in a children's book today: The tourists gathered around the lake, taking photographs of the wildlife in the area. The cat sat itself down on the veranda, stretching its ...
2
votes
1answer
462 views

Is it bad to start a sentence with “as”?

My boss doesn't like it when I start sentences with "as", and I'm not sure if it's actually a problem. A case where I would start with "as" would be: As your new account manager, it is my ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Why are these questions structured differently?

How many rooms does your apartment have? How many rooms have carpeting? I'm a native speaker of English teaching at a language school. Recently I was stumped by a question made by a student. ...
2
votes
2answers
30 views

Is the word order acceptable here?

I come from a family of completely Italian lineage called the Carusos. Since "the Carusos" is the antecedent of "family" is it that bad to have it come after lineage? Would it be better to say: I ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Awkward style choice or syntax error?

I'm doing a bit of copy editing on some work, and ran into a sentence that I feel is poorly constructed; however, the author insists that there is no error and that the supposed error in question is a ...
2
votes
3answers
181 views

Why does “complex sentence” vs “compound sentence” matter?

This question asks about (teaching) the distinction between complex and compound sentences. I have managed to read really quite widely in linguistics for more than fifty years without ever as far as ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Is this an example of a dangling modifier too?

"From an original focus on the oil industry, Platts gradually expanded its purview to include metals, shipping, and all energy-related markets - oil, coal, natural gas, electricity, nuclear power, ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Is it “the humanities” or just “humanities”?

I.e., would I use "I hate the humanities" or "I hate humanities"? On that note, would the complementary statement be "I love the sciences" or "I love science"? "I love sciences" just sounds wrong, ...
4
votes
1answer
41 views

Isn't this a dangling something?

As one of the busiest times of year, people will share moments, plan for the festivities and search for the perfect gift, every single day — on Facebook. And this year, it will truly be a mobile ...
-1
votes
3answers
132 views

Can I say “Why not you study literature?” [closed]

May I ask you this question meaning to emphasize the importance of studying literature? What has confused me is that the question, ironically, carries the same implication of, "Why study literature?" ...
8
votes
2answers
168 views

Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
0
votes
0answers
106 views

What formal English syntax tree notations are there?

I don't have enough karma to comment on their answer itself, and so I was forced to create a separate question, though this is probably otherwise for the better, anyway. Link to the answer: ...
1
vote
1answer
153 views

uncommon use of “as well as” compounding two verbs onto one subject

I've got a pretty strong intuition for what's grammatically correct and what's not. My hunch here is that the following sentence is wrong. Can someone verify this for me, using a syntactical rule to ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Is it acceptable to say “It is one of my most important things.”?

My question is if I want to say It is one of the most important things for me. In another way, can I say It is one of my most important things. instead? And does the latter one sound ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

Invoices status, Invoices statuses, Invoices' status or Invoices' statuses

According to this, statuses is the plural of status. However, I am not sure here which one to use, my logic is statuses is more proper as each invoice has different status. But seems awkward word or ...
-1
votes
1answer
132 views

Ending a sentence with “and thanks”

I have a colleague who ends many emails with "and thanks". To me it sounds awkward and random, but I wonder if anyone has seen this usage before? Examples (note particularly the third one!): "That ...
2
votes
1answer
232 views

Can “some” be a noun and a subject?

What is the noun in this sentence: Some of our greatest innovations were launched during tough times. I know that of our greatest innovations is a prepositional phrase and as such cannot contain ...
5
votes
1answer
154 views

Poetic syntax with “as” and “so”

Does anyone know how to describe the type of poetic syntax of the line: "As the deer panteth for the water / So my soul longeth after thee" or something to that effect. I'm not sure if this ...
3
votes
2answers
138 views

“Now that x, y,” vs. “Now x, y” (“Now” in dependent clauses): British vs. American English

I have noticed that British English speakers tend not to use that after now in certain dependent clauses where American English speakers will almost certainly use it. BE version of two examples: ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

“Choose a username that is …and must contain”: phrased incorrectly or just awkwardly?

The following parameters are given regarding creating acceptable usernames for a particular website: The username is case sensitive. Choose a username that is 6-74 characters long and must contain ...
0
votes
3answers
94 views

Does “use X, Y, or Z” mean use *one of* or *all of* the options?

This is the text supposedly providing the parameters for creating acceptable usernames for a particular website: The username is case sensitive. Choose a username that is 6-74 characters long and ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

How to properly use “not…without” in English? [closed]

Please help me out by criticizing on the grammar and syntax of the following sentence used in my cover letter. I would like to make sure the sentence is not confusing in any way before sending it out. ...
0
votes
2answers
154 views

Matching tenses of sentences

I'm writing to enquire whether there is a need for ... Wishing to be a part of your team thought the best way to go about it was to ask you directly. My background is mostly with ... but my ...
0
votes
1answer
163 views

Is it correct to say that “John is responsible for Mary”? [closed]

Is it correct to say that "John is responsible for Mary"? If not, what should we say? What I want to denote is a mix of all these senses: Supporting someone, because of sympathy, and also morally ...
2
votes
2answers
66 views

observe someone … to have been…,

My question is in following sentence What happens, says Hume, is that we observe individuals of one species to have been constantly attended by individuals of another. Why use to have been ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Changing case within quoted text

I'm familiar with the convention that square brackets may be used within quoted text to indicate word[s] that aren't actually present [in that exact form] in the original. It's often necessary where ...
4
votes
3answers
134 views

Which is preferable: “We are all” or “we all are”

"We are all mad." "We all are mad." I think each of these conveys the same idea. Besides this, we can use "we are all" alone. I hear the first one more frequently. Does the second one sound worse ...
0
votes
4answers
379 views

Is the verb “are” missing in this sentence?

I have a question about a possible grammatical error in this sentence: "We hope you find our toilets in good condition". I came across it lately on one of the mall's notice boards. In my opinion this ...
4
votes
1answer
179 views

Syntax of have - already - yet

I am not sure about the last bit of the following sentence whether it is grammatically correct or not. Isn't the usage of the two words "already" and "yet" tautologous? I think one of each is actually ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Syntactic function of “what” in specific case

See the following sentence: Be careful what you eat. In this case, "what" is having which syntactic function? I checked the possibilities in the wiktionary: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/what My ...