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2
votes
0answers
34 views

Are “this” and “next” demonstrative determiners?

In the following, is this a demonstrative determiner: I will go to the store this week. If so, then what class is next in the following: I will go to the store next week. It seems that ...
4
votes
3answers
222 views

Personal pronoun - Using 'it' when introducing a person

On the NPR radio program Wait Wait Don't Tell Me (http://www.npr.org/programs/wait-wait-dont-tell-me/) Peter Sagal introduces the week's panelists using 'it's,' as in "She'll be performing Friday at ...
-1
votes
0answers
12 views

Given: example quote. How to analyze it(explain, respond, or give an opinion) for a research paper? Topic of paper: sleep deprivation [duplicate]

Scientists claim “Sleep deprivation leads to lower alertness and concentration” as well as impairs memory” (Peri). This quote asserts the idea that insufficient sleep cannot enhance learning and ...
1
vote
3answers
80 views

Sufficient or sufficiently?

When we compare this with his [Milton's] later prose writings, when he moved closer to the victorious Cromwellian ascendancy, we find that pragmatism usurped idealism, not completely but ...
5
votes
3answers
96 views

Particle or preposition?

I'm studying Spanish and I have some questions about the grammatical parallels in English. Le gustan cocinar y hornear. He likes to cook and (to) bake. When an infinitive is used in ...
2
votes
2answers
96 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
2
votes
0answers
17 views

“Who” usage in interrogative form [duplicate]

When using "who" in a question, which is correct: Is it I who has erred? Is it I who have erred? The latter seems correct by test (take out who), but the former seems correct by question form ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

How many different parts of speech can the f-word be used as?

In an "interesting" thread of comments we began to look at the word fuck in several different uses. Most of them were interjections and verb uses as would be expected. But, perhaps dialectally, the ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Infinitive use in “whether or not he be” compared with its use in “if he be”

Here is the phrase in question: . . . but whether he be, or whether he be not. . . . Is the usage of the infinitive in that phrase above the same sort of thing as occurs in this quotation: ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

Syntactically and semantically discuss [closed]

(A) He cut the speech short. / He cut short the speech. (B) He broke the casket open. / He broke open the casket. (A) He hammered the metal flat. / *He hammered flat the metal. (B) He ...
1
vote
2answers
140 views

Meaning of “It flaming spread” in a Tolkien poem

Tolkien wrote a poem called “Over the misty mountains cold”, which is featured as a song in the first Hobbit movie. In this poem there are those verses that made me scratch my head: The pines were ...
1
vote
1answer
155 views

“Help” as a Non-Modal verb

Please read the following sentence: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is planning his retirement in the next nine months from the software giant he helped build. Would you consider "helped" a ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Is this mixture of plural and singular legitimate?

But what is most important for our purposes is that these changes were the signal for the resumption of historical debate on a grand scale, of the kind that had been suspended or driven ...
2
votes
1answer
224 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
6
votes
1answer
149 views

History of the non-rule that proscribes ending a sentence with a preposition [duplicate]

Famously, if not accurately, Winston Churchill is supposed to have responding to an editor who had "fixed" a sentence ending with a preposition by writing, "This is the sort of thing up with which I ...
-1
votes
1answer
4k views

Is There a Way to Remember Nouns, Verbs & Adjectives [closed]

Is there a simple and concise way to remember nouns, adjectives and verbs aside from poems? I am aware of a number of poems available to aid memory, but I am looking for something a lot more simple. ...
0
votes
4answers
377 views

Is the verb “are” missing in this sentence?

I have a question about a possible grammatical error in this sentence: "We hope you find our toilets in good condition". I came across it lately on one of the mall's notice boards. In my opinion this ...
1
vote
1answer
123 views

Grammatical role of “kind of” [closed]

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is? I kind of like cold weather or I kind of eat everything".
2
votes
1answer
717 views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
-2
votes
1answer
146 views

The ironic correlation of the words “Ineffable” and “Circumlocution”

Both the word "Ineffable" and "Circumlocution" are contradictory by definition. For context; first The very existence of the words shows defies its definition; so should one say "indescribable" as ...
8
votes
6answers
622 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Subject, verb, direct object, object complement” versus “subject, verb, indirect object, direct object”

Reading English Grammar (HarperCollins College Outline, published by HarperResource, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers) I found a chapter (Sentence Basics) that explains that in English there are ...