Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Parse: It's his job **to stand there.**

"It is his job to stand there" What's the function of the infinitive phrase in this sentence? I'm leaning towards it being an appositive of the complement "his job" or of the subject "it", but I'm ...
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60 views

What is the equivalent in English of the French sentence part “complément de phrase”?

In French, a sentence has two essential syntactic parts (the subject and the predicate) and may have one or more "complément de phrase", which are optional parts. "complément de phrase" = "sentence ...
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1answer
35 views

He happened + infin

I happened to see... In sentences like this, is the infinitive the object of happen? Can happen be transitive?
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36 views

It is possible + infinitive

It is not possible to keep abreast of the normal tides of acquisition. (Source) Can someone analyze this sentence? My first thought was that the infinitive 'to keep' modifies possible, but then ...
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27 views

The syntax of “ put somebody to something”

My wife, a strategist, knew better and began quietly mobilizing the forces that would eventually put our goods to rout My question is about the syntax of the subordinate clause. subj: that ...
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2answers
66 views

Syntax of phrase “The word cancer”

"On one of the mornings of disposal, a man from a second-hand bookstore visited us, bought several hundred books, and told us of the death of his brother, the word cancer exploding in the living ...
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1answer
47 views

Syntax of “It seemed to be a person”

How do you you parse this sentence? Here's my attempt: subj: It verb: seemed comp: to be a man (infinitive) is the whole infinitive phrase the complement or is "a man" the complement, and "to be" ...
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3answers
309 views

Can adjectives be placed in front of verbs, e.g. “The duck was busy diving for food”?

The duck was busy diving for food. The duck was busily diving for food. Are both sentences grammatically correct? If the first one is correct, does it mean that adjectives can be placed ...
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28 views

“ I kept hoping that…”

In this sentence, is "hoping" a gerund functioning as the object of kept or a participle modifying the subject?
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2answers
91 views

Wikipedia's definition of “Adverbial”

On the Wikipedia page for Adverbials, it says [emphasis mine] In grammar an adverbial is a word (an adverb) or a group of words (an adverbial phrase or an adverbial clause) that modifies or tells ...
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2answers
124 views

“The bigger, the better”

What is the function of "the" in these kinds of phrases? It cannot be the definite article. Can someone analyze this? It's common and definitely standard but seems to elude any grammatical ...
2
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2answers
87 views

What part of speech is “thank you”?

Can anybody please tell me the subject, verb, and object of this sentence: Thank you all for conducting a landmark experiment. I would also like to please know what part of speech thank you ...
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1answer
686 views

How to decide on the type of ellipsis

I'm having some hard time deciding on the types of a few ellipses I've got to analyze. Let's consider an example such as this one: Then Rosemary came out and said that Daddy was going to jail, ...
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107 views

Names for different forms of “command” sentences and their parts [closed]

Edit: I'm rewording the question, so as to maybe make it more answerable. My goal: I'd like to create a parser that allows my program to accept certain types of english sentences. In particular, I ...
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1answer
62 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
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5answers
477 views

Can someone please explain the syntactic rules at work here?

I'll use an example statement that's currently being used in a radio commercial for American Family Insurance (paraphrased.) They all told me that I couldn't build my dream home by myself; but, I ...
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1answer
98 views

Preposition “over” vs Adverb “over”

annual growth of [over 7 percent] What do you think the part of "over" is? Is "over" considered the preposition of the object "7 percent"? over [7 percent] Or, is "over" considered ...
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1answer
214 views

Are there exceptions to the “place yourself last” rule for listing people? [closed]

Forgive me if this has already been asked. I understand that some aspects of this lovely language have dependencies on where and when things are used so I'm not quite sure if this question can be ...
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1answer
41 views

To whoever wills … Vs. To whomever wills [duplicate]

So, is it "whoever" because it is the subject of the predicate "wills", or is it "whomever" because it is the object of the preposition "to"?
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1answer
88 views

Can object of a clause be the subject of other clause?

Please, help me to get rid from following problems: 1) He proposed to her, who had requited his love from the moment they met. 2) She, whom he had met only two weeks before, thought his proposal ...
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9answers
5k views

Exact meaning of the Gandalf quote, “He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom.”?

What is the exact meaning of following quote (it belongs to Gandalf the Grey): He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom. I have a problem especially with ...
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2answers
82 views

Does the phrase “so long as” have a negative sense?

Can I use neither . . . nor following the phrase so long as? I read this sentence in an article: When I was in college a Marwari friend of mine told me that her parents would be totally open to ...
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3answers
48 views

How to dissect/parse 'which' followed by five subordinate clauses ? (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 A. Continency is not required of all, but such as have by vow engaged to keep it: and ...
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3answers
177 views

Is this a direct object or predicate complement?

In this sentence: This book cost me 20 dollars. Is 20 dollars a direct object or a predicative complement?
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2answers
869 views

Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts [duplicate]

What determines whether something is a "noun adjunct" or just a garden-variety adjective? Does it matter in any meaningful way? Here is my hypothesis, but I can't find any authoritative source to ...
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3answers
691 views

What is the origin of auxiliary verbs?

When and why did we start using auxiliary verbs, particularly "do", to ask questions and make negatives?
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4answers
738 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...
5
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0answers
335 views

Buffalo explanation [duplicate]

Could anybody please explain in detail the sentence "Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo." I have seen the wikipedia pages but am unable to get it properly.
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0answers
69 views

Correctness of “of my sending the picture” [duplicate]

Is this sentence correct? I don’t think Linda would have approved of my sending the picture; but I did it anyway. Specifically, is of my sending the picture correct?
3
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2answers
253 views

Telling if a word is a verb in the imperative mood

I'm working on a static analysis tool for the documentation in the Python programming language (PEP257). For this, I need to check if the first word in a documentation string is a verb in the ...
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1answer
49 views

Are nonrestrictive elements considered part of the subject or part of the predicate?

Wolves, hunted to extinction in Wyoming and Montana in the twentieth century, occupy a vital place in the natural cycle of the area. In the above sentence, is the nonrestrictive element hunted to ...
3
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1answer
220 views

This long sentence is ambiguous, and difficult for me to understand [closed]

I got this sentence Property value litigation is no different than any other type of litigation where experts are used in that expert opinions are fair game for attack by the opposing side in ...
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1answer
154 views

What’s Up: Adverb vs Preposition

I start with a simple sentence: “I climb the ladder.” This contains a nice transitive verb with a clear direct object. If I slightly modify the sentence: “I climb up the ladder.” I believe that I ...
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1answer
93 views

Part of Speech, adverb or adjective? [closed]

From a part of Pollyanna written by Elenor Porter: "There ain't no tellin'," sobbed Nancy. "She lay back that white an' still she might easy be dead; but Miss Polly said she wa'n't dead--an' ...
2
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3answers
424 views

What is the grammatical construction in “Be but sworn”?

I have found several questions asking for the meaning, but the thing that troubles me here is the grammar actually and i haven't found anything on that. In Shakespeare's sentence "Deny thy father ...
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3answers
857 views

What's the subject of “There is my biscuit!” ? And how about “There is one biscuit left”?

What's the subject, grammatically speaking, of these sentences? There is my biscuit! My biscuit is there! There is one biscuit left. I don't really know how to analyze these. The following ...
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1answer
197 views

Parts of Speech and Grammar Point for -ing

Can someone help me to explain the two following structures — identifying parts of speech, and in particular why we’re using the -ing form of have in the first? How about having lunch? Why don't we ...
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1answer
3k views

Punctuation following “My question is…” [duplicate]

Forgive me if this has been asked before (if it has been, I couldn't find it) What punctuation, if any, should I use after "My question is..."? For example, My question is why is ice so ...
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3answers
460 views

Transformation? Cleft?

I am wondering if the difference between "It is terrible." and "What it is, is it is terrible." can mostly be described in terms of transformations, grammatically. Is it a kind of cleft sentence?
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1answer
79 views

Are these default questions about events correct grammatically? [closed]

As you can see below, I created some default questions which are supposed to ask about events that either have happened or will happen in future(the gaps will be filled by different events such as ...
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1answer
73 views

The practice of identifying authors from their writings

Is there an English word for the practice of analysing texts to determine their authors? For example, comparing three texts A, B and C and realising that the choice of words, grammar and style of ...
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2answers
2k views

On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
3
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3answers
570 views

Existential sentence…in the passive voice?

Now, a friend over the internet wanted me to explain the passive voice to him. He began by providing his story's "readability statistics" of Microsoft Word, which said that 7% of his sentences were ...
2
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3answers
301 views

When does one append “-ly”?

I am trying to understand the difference between adjectives that end in ‑ly compared with adjectives that do not end end in ‑ly. For example (the ones I would have chosen are bold): A tactical ...
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2answers
148 views

How to best correct ambiguity of “in the room next to me”?

A common construction in English is: There is a person in the room next to me. However, this is ambiguous because it’s unclear whether the person is in a separate room that happens to be ...
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1answer
70 views

What is “post patent expiration”?

GMCR paid high prices to avoid having to compete with licensees post patent expiration. Is post a verb here, or is it a part of post patent expiration? What does it mean?
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1answer
287 views

Using two and’s in one sentence, and starting a sentence with “To” [duplicate]

Is this sentence correct? To view your policy status, last payment information and next payment information, enter your policy number in the box below and click Submit to continue. I’m not a fan ...
1
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2answers
298 views

Does removing the comma before 'which' in a non-restrictive clause change the meaning of the sentence?

There are many 'rules' on the net saying that a comma should be placed before the relative pronoun 'which' in a non-restrictive clause. (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/relative-clauses) But ...
2
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1answer
720 views

Is “anecdotally” a proper adverb?

And if yes, is it common or rather odd? Example sentence: Anecdotally, we do see instances of customers buying both our products at the same store. The Chrome spellchecker doesn't seem to ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Is this Adverbial a complement or an adjunct?

According to Wiki, Adverbials are typically divided into four classes: adverbial complements (i.e. obligatory adverbial) are adverbials that render a sentence ungrammatical and meaningless if ...