Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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list all possible meanings of this sentence

I would like to know all of the syntactically valid meanings of the following sentence: I am going to eat a bagel with egg on it like my wife. I can think of the following meanings: My wife ...
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1answer
46 views

Will this question be rated relatively high? Or relatively highly?

I was copy-editing a report at work and came across the following sentence: While sustainability in the transport sector was rated relatively high, the sustainability of the power sector was found ...
3
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1answer
76 views

Can colours be used as an adverb?

I am trying to understand which syntactic role the word red has in this sentence: We could colour the walls red. My first thought was it being an adverb, but I have never heard someone saying ...
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1answer
24 views

Some clause structure about “SOURCE said that CLAUSE”?

Suppose we have the following sentences: John believes that people are good. Steve knows that France is in Europe. Now, in these sentences we have some clause (e.g. People are good, France ...
2
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1answer
67 views

“Conflict” Resolution: How to decide if two words are generally “unmistakable”?

Conflict Resolution in Stenographic Transcription The purpose of this question is for stenography. Stenographers often have “conflicts” in their writing, or in their typing using machine shorthand. ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Word to indicate the naming process of something due to an oft repeated name not originally pertaining to it

A word that describes the naming process of something, because it was so much repeated, like a nick name. Presently, The Company,(city) _______(Named thus by a general saying of a name) was a show ...
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2answers
69 views

Analysing “Ain't got no use for no coal company”

I'm writing my thesis and I have a problem analysing this sentence: "Ain't got no use for no coal company" (Grisham, 2014: 157). I know there's no subject - is it therefore an ellipsis? I don't ...
3
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1answer
85 views

Meaning of “We have worked too long for the priests to undermine us with more fairy-tales.” [closed]

I want to know the real meaning of this sentence: We have worked too long for the priests to undermine us with more fairy-tales. Have we worked too long for the priests? Or have we worked too ...
1
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1answer
57 views

what does “showing the fly the way out of the fly-bottle” literally means?

I saw this expression: "the aim of the activity is "to show the fly the way out of the fly-bottle". " (It is connected with this other expression: "I don't know my way about".) I grasped the ...
2
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2answers
71 views

Why was the subject and verb inverted in a declarative sentence?

Preface: I ask only about the syntax and not semantics; I comprehend the meaning behind the following quote (for a paraphrase in 20C English; see p 27 of 35), but I am inexperienced with Early Modern ...
2
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2answers
138 views

Difference between gerund and present participle [duplicate]

What is the difference between a gerund and present participle? When should we use a gerund and when should we use a present participle ?
7
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4answers
462 views

Ambiguous syntax tree and phrase structure rules

I’m studying for a final for my English Linguistics class and going through example sentences that we should be able to draw syntax trees for. The sentence He looked at the dog with one eye was marked ...
3
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3answers
97 views

What's the syntactic function of 'playing together' in: “ They spent the day playing together”

My attempt to analyse this sentence: sbj: They vrb: spent obj: the day What is the function of the participle phrase "playing together"?
3
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1answer
58 views

The syntax of “come to assume” [duplicate]

I have come to assume that.... I have come to believe that... How would you parse this. Is "come to" a phrasal modal?
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3answers
161 views

What is a syntactic construction?

Okay, I'm not quite sure if i'm allowed to post this here. I had a look at the linguistics SE, but it seems that questions there have to be research-level, and this is extremely elementary however I ...
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0answers
24 views

The syntax of “make this out to be that”

I'm trying to parse: You are making him out to be a saint I don't even know where to start. My guess: sbj: You vrb: are making out (interpreting this as a separable phrasal verb) obj: him ...
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3answers
58 views

The syntax of “have something done”

I'm trying to parse this sentence: I had to have my immune system completely wiped out with chemotherapy. sbj: I vrb: {had to} have obj: my immune system Is "completely wiped out with ...
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3answers
71 views

What is the correct form of this sentence?

This sentence sounds funny to me: To finish this task it is imperative that all effects are considered in the used step-by-step plan. While the same sentence, with the last verb in a different ...
2
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1answer
73 views

The meaning of the MIDDLE ENGLISH “nother”

Very specific expertise is required here. The schoolmaster "shall not teche his scolers song nor other petite lernyng, as the crosse rewe, redyng of the mateyns or for the psalter or such ...
4
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1answer
56 views

What is the grammatical role of *your* in “… by your being …” phrases?

While writing a sentence the other day, it struck me that the following phrase has an odd feel to it that I cannot explain: Everyone will benefit by your being well cared for. I kept wanting to ...
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2answers
425 views

Can an infinitive be the object of a preposition?

"I found a place for Tom and Stacy to live." I first thought that the prepositional phrase "for Tom and Stacy" and the infinitive "to live" were separate phrases both modifying "place". Is it ...
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0answers
61 views

IC Analysis process and format

Would anyone be able to help with the process and format for a bracketed IC analysis of the following sentences? The furniture which I bought arrived yesterday. 1.a So far I've figured [S [NP [NP ...
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2answers
68 views

Extraposed clauses

"Before the war, you always think that it's not you that dies." - Ernest Hemmingway I'm having trouble diagramming this sentence. My question is about the subordinate clause in bold. Is the ...
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1answer
69 views

Parse: It's his job **to stand there.**

"It is his job to stand there" What's the function of the infinitive phrase in this sentence? I'm leaning towards it being an appositive of the complement "his job" or of the subject "it", but I'm ...
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3answers
335 views

What is the equivalent in English of the French sentence part “complément de phrase”?

In French, a sentence has two essential syntactic parts (the subject and the predicate) and may have one or more "complément de phrase", which are optional parts. "complément de phrase" = "sentence ...
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1answer
58 views

He happened + infin

I happened to see... In sentences like this, is the infinitive the object of happen? Can happen be transitive?
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2answers
125 views

It is possible + infinitive

It is not possible to keep abreast of the normal tides of acquisition. (Source) Can someone analyze this sentence? My first thought was that the infinitive 'to keep' modifies possible, but then I ...
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54 views

The syntax of “ put somebody to something”

My wife, a strategist, knew better and began quietly mobilizing the forces that would eventually put our goods to rout My question is about the syntax of the subordinate clause. subj: that ...
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2answers
102 views

Syntax of phrase “The word cancer”

"On one of the mornings of disposal, a man from a second-hand bookstore visited us, bought several hundred books, and told us of the death of his brother, the word cancer exploding in the living room ...
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3answers
206 views

Syntax of “It seemed to be a person”

How do you you parse this sentence? Here's my attempt: subj: It verb: seemed comp: to be a man (infinitive) is the whole infinitive phrase the complement or is "a man" the complement, and "to be" ...
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3answers
527 views

Can adjectives be placed in front of verbs, e.g. “The duck was busy diving for food”?

The duck was busy diving for food. The duck was busily diving for food. Are both sentences grammatically correct? If the first one is correct, does it mean that adjectives can be placed in ...
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0answers
86 views

“ I kept hoping that…”

In this sentence, is "hoping" a gerund functioning as the object of kept or a participle modifying the subject?
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2answers
205 views

Wikipedia's definition of “Adverbial”

On the Wikipedia page for Adverbials, it says [emphasis mine] In grammar an adverbial is a word (an adverb) or a group of words (an adverbial phrase or an adverbial clause) that modifies or tells ...
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2answers
2k views

“The bigger, the better”

What is the function of "the" in these kinds of phrases? It cannot be the definite article. Can someone analyze this? It's common and definitely standard but seems to elude any grammatical ...
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3answers
657 views

What part of speech is “thank you”?

Can anybody please tell me the subject, verb, and object of this sentence: Thank you all for conducting a landmark experiment. I would also like to please know what part of speech thank you ...
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3answers
1k views

How to decide on the type of ellipsis

I'm having some hard time deciding on the types of a few ellipses I've got to analyze. Let's consider an example such as this one: Then Rosemary came out and said that Daddy was going to jail, ...
3
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0answers
174 views

Names for different forms of “command” sentences and their parts [closed]

Edit: I'm rewording the question, so as to maybe make it more answerable. My goal: I'd like to create a parser that allows my program to accept certain types of english sentences. In particular, I ...
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1answer
95 views

Does a word being a noun change on context?

In Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, there are double-noun pairs which I believe are syntactically wrong: Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we ...
6
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5answers
681 views

Can someone please explain the syntactic rules at work here?

I'll use an example statement that's currently being used in a radio commercial for American Family Insurance (paraphrased.) They all told me that I couldn't build my dream home by myself; but, I ...
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1answer
210 views

Preposition “over” vs Adverb “over”

annual growth of [over 7 percent] What do you think the part of "over" is? Is "over" considered the preposition of the object "7 percent"? over [7 percent] Or, is "over" considered the ...
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1answer
1k views

Are there exceptions to the “place yourself last” rule for listing people? [closed]

Forgive me if this has already been asked. I understand that some aspects of this lovely language have dependencies on where and when things are used so I'm not quite sure if this question can be ...
0
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1answer
71 views

To whoever wills … Vs. To whomever wills [duplicate]

So, is it "whoever" because it is the subject of the predicate "wills", or is it "whomever" because it is the object of the preposition "to"?
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1answer
124 views

Can object of a clause be the subject of other clause?

Please, help me to get rid from following problems: 1) He proposed to her, who had requited his love from the moment they met. 2) She, whom he had met only two weeks before, thought his proposal ...
20
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9answers
5k views

Exact meaning of the Gandalf quote, “He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom.”?

What is the exact meaning of following quote (it belongs to Gandalf the Grey): He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom. I have a problem especially with ...
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2answers
146 views

Does the phrase “so long as” have a negative sense?

Can I use neither . . . nor following the phrase so long as? I read this sentence in an article: When I was in college a Marwari friend of mine told me that her parents would be totally open to ...
2
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3answers
70 views

How to dissect/parse 'which' followed by five subordinate clauses ? (1786 UK)

Source: p 174, The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments ..., by Richard Challoner, 1786 A. Continency is not required of all, but such as have by vow engaged to keep it: and ...
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3answers
244 views

Is this a direct object or predicate complement?

In this sentence: This book cost me 20 dollars. Is 20 dollars a direct object or a predicative complement?
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2answers
2k views

Adjectives versus Noun Adjuncts [duplicate]

What determines whether something is a "noun adjunct" or just a garden-variety adjective? Does it matter in any meaningful way? Here is my hypothesis, but I can't find any authoritative source to ...
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4answers
2k views

What is the origin of auxiliary verbs?

When and why did we start using auxiliary verbs, particularly "do", to ask questions and make negatives?
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4answers
795 views

Grammatical role of “the hell”?

I’m wondering exactly which grammatical role the word hell takes on in expressions such as Get the hell out of here the hell in this case seems to modify the phrasal verb to get out (get out ...