A synonym is a word that means the same, or almost the same thing, as another word.

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8
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3answers
397 views

Is healthful considered an acceptable synonym of healthy?

To my ear, healthful does not sound right. This could well be geographical bias on my part. Is it now a valid alternative to healthy? Does it have another meaning?
0
votes
0answers
516 views

“Grayed out” or “Greyed out”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Gray' vs 'Grey' Which one is correct? Is it "Grayed out" or "Greyed out"? Google brings almost the same number of results for both. Can they always be ...
1
vote
7answers
29k views

“Commitment” vs. “dedication”

I use both interchangeably. What's the difference?
5
votes
2answers
7k views

What is the difference between “subscription” and “membership”?

A friend of mine is trying to coin the correct English word for the people paying for his company's services. My initial choice was "subscriptions", but I'm not so sure about "membership". Do you ...
2
votes
1answer
749 views

Synonym: Medium or soothsayer

I don't know if many of you watched the new Matt Damon movie Hereafter. Near the end of the movie, the little boy who lost his twin brother meets Matt Damon in the Book reading room, and says ...
7
votes
5answers
876 views

Can “paper bag” mean any bag?

Being Swedish but living in Kenya for many years I initially reacted when at the local market I was offered a paper bag (verbally) but given a plastic bag (physically). This is always the case and ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

“Economic” vs. “Economical”

What is the difference between "economic" and "economical"?
4
votes
4answers
771 views

Mark: outstanding (as in: not yet known)

I’m updating my tabular CV for an application and I’d like to include my master thesis even though it’s not yet finished (soon!) and marked. So I’d like to write that the mark is still outstanding but ...
3
votes
2answers
370 views

What is the the role of the two a’s in “we planned to meet a few times a year”?

How can I rewrite this sentence without the two a’s? We planned to meet a few times a year. I think this would be the best way to show the role that the two a’s play in the sentence.
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Cuddle”, “snuggle” or “huggle”

There is a ton of words with similar, yet slightly different meaning that describe this kind of physical affection where we touch a loved one. What is the difference between cuddle, snuggle and ...
3
votes
2answers
412 views

What is a good substitute that is less localized than “secular”?

I am having trouble using the term "secular" to convey a sense of bringing a religiously neutral ground to government, society, and culture. What term is better than "secular", that is less localized ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

What are differences of meaning among device, gadget, gimmick and gizmo?

Further to today's my question about the words, 'off-the-shelf' used in Time Magazine's feature story titled 'The Best 50 Invention of The Year' (Nov. 11th 2010 Issue), I found the following sentence ...
6
votes
6answers
9k views

Is there a semantic difference between relevance and pertinence?

The dictionary defines relevant as being Closely connected or appropriate to the matter at hand whilst pertinent is defined as Relevant or applicable to a particular matter. Both of these ...
20
votes
9answers
114k views

Using “dear”, “darling”, or “honey” to address a friend

As far as I know dear, darling, and honey are commonly used between lovers, but I suppose there are more words like that. What else is commonly used? Which of these can be used to address a ...
20
votes
5answers
42k views

What is the difference between “gift” and “present”?

What is the difference between gift and present?
0
votes
1answer
201 views

Periodical vs Issue?

I found issues were used on some websites like "$1 an issue". (Some magazines.) But I found another word periodical was used on my vocabulary book as follows: The periodical is published every ...
4
votes
4answers
11k views

“temporal” vs. “temporary” [closed]

Is there any difference between the two? In a technical document I have used a phrase "this is a temporal solution" and my coworker told that he'd use "temporary" in the context. Is one of the two ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

service record translation [closed]

How do you say "El servicio militar" in English?
3
votes
4answers
735 views

Superlative version or synonym of “Versatile”

I'm looking for comparative/superlative versions of versatile - synonyms which should mean "more versatile" and "extremely versatile" Here's the background: Over on meta.so, I've proposed a new ...
43
votes
4answers
20k views

When are “because”, “since”,“for” and “as” interchangeable?

I am not a native speaker. On a previous question of mine, I thanked for an answer by saying: So the phrase is not an idiom, since it is applied in its literal sense. I consciously chose since ...
4
votes
5answers
776 views

Euphemisms or synonyms for plagiarism

Any funny euphemisms or synonyms for plagiarism?
0
votes
1answer
991 views

Difference between “Archival record” and “Archive reference”

How should an official document containing information about exams passed by a person in previous years be called? Are there any differences between "Archival record" and "Archive reference" in the ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Delegated to” vs. “Assigned to”

What is the differences in these terms. I want to use one of them in Task management software. Which term is better for the menu meaning "List of task that was delegated|assigned to me" and "List of ...
10
votes
3answers
17k views

“To date” versus “until now”

Is there a difference between these two expressions? Are they perfect synonyms?
1
vote
4answers
1k views

How do I say “what technologies should be *used* in a project”?

Hey, I'd need a synonym for used in this phrase, because the meaning is from the "long term" point of view, something like: What technologies should be employed in a project for it to succeed in ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “onerous” and “arduous”?

Is there any difference in the meaning of these words? Which one of them is used the most in everyday conversation? In my vocabulary for both words I've found essentially the same meaning: "difficult ...
5
votes
5answers
10k views

What's the difference between Media and Press

What's the difference between Media and Press, I think that press for newspapers and media for TV, can anyone give us details about that?
13
votes
5answers
22k views

“Miniscule” vs. “minuscule”

Does the former have a typo or are they synonyms? Do they always have the same meaning? Please enlighten me as I am confused on this matter.
15
votes
15answers
91k views

What is the adjective form for the word “integrity?”

I'm looking for the adjective form of "integrity." Instead of "Be a person of integrity," I'd like to say something like "Be [one word I'm looking for]" I did a Google search for this, but I also ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

A word for the meaning of “over-constrained”

I want to express that I constrained something too much such that it is contradictory now. At first sight, over-constrained seems to fit, but I am not sure whether it is fine to use in a scientific ...
10
votes
4answers
18k views

Is there any difference between 'often' and 'frequently'?

Do both mean exactly the same or do they have slightly different meanings?
19
votes
5answers
15k views

Is there a subtle difference between “inherent” and “intrinsic”?

I've always used "inherent" and "intrinsic" interchangeably. Dictionary.com doesn't offer much help in distinguishing them.
16
votes
9answers
7k views

Is there a real difference between “null” and “zero”?

Are zero and null perfect synonyms?
16
votes
8answers
24k views

Word for person who loves to share knowledge

What is a word for a person who loves to share knowledge? So far I have educator in mind. Is there any other word?
21
votes
5answers
17k views

What is the distinction between “among” and “amongst”?

It seems amongst is quite often used as a synonym for among but it is supposed to sound more distinguished. Is there any difference in the meaning?
5
votes
10answers
4k views

What's a word similar in usage to “diatribe,” but not as harsh?

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a diatribe is defined as a forceful and bitter verbal attack against someone or something. I had previously understood it to mean something more along the ...
12
votes
5answers
6k views

“high rate of speed” or “high speed” to mean going fast

Why do reporters (and sometimes police officers) say that somebody was going at a high rate of speed when they actually mean high speed? In physics, speed is already the rate of distance over time, ...
15
votes
7answers
22k views

When is it appropriate to use “Yeah” and “Yep” as variants of the word “Yes”?

As a learner of English I know that yes is a standard variant and other two are informal, spoken words. I know nothing more about it, and try always use the yes variant, just not to sound ...
3
votes
5answers
3k views

What does the word “cinemaddict” mean?

Please explain to me (non-native speaker) what the word "cinemaddict" means. What synonyms does it have?
35
votes
8answers
24k views

Is there a subtle difference between “somebody” and “someone”, “anybody” and “anyone”?

Are there any subtle differences between "somebody" and "someone", or can they be used completely interchangeably? Similarly, can you imagine a situation in which you would prefer "anybody" to ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

What are the possible words for a task?

I am looking for similar words to task for a document on scheduling tasks in the context of a project. My goal would be to find words that would denote meanings for three things. A word for a small ...
43
votes
5answers
14k views

Alternatives to “and/or”?

As a programmer, I have no problem with seeing or using "and/or" in technical documentation. For example, I can upvote an answer that satisfies me and/or mark it as accepted. That's perfectly ...
34
votes
3answers
6k views

Why are not “infamous” and “inflammable” the opposite of “famous” and “flammable”?

Why are not infamous and inflammable the opposite of famous and flammable, like incomplete, inactivity, inappropriate and so on?
13
votes
6answers
27k views

When is it appropriate to use “titled” vs. “entitled”?

When is it appropriate to use "titled" vs. "entitled"? For example, which is the correct word to use in the following sentence? I really liked the conclusion to rands’ latest blog post entitled ...
29
votes
12answers
9k views

Do the words “jail” and “prison” refer to different things?

In everyday speech, the terms jail and prison are used interchangeably in many situations. However, my understanding is that, at least in the US, they actually refer to slightly different things. For ...
3
votes
4answers
631 views

Should I use “speaker” or “loud speaker” to refer to the signal → vibration → sound thingy?

I am a native german speaker, so I have absolutely no good intuitions when it comes to choosing the right alternative out of a candidate set. Today, one problem was: How should I call the sound-making ...
14
votes
8answers
24k views

Are there any differences between “I believe” vs “I think” vs “I reckon”?

These are the three most common ways to say "I think." (At least, I believe so. I mean, I think so. Um...) Are there any subtle differences between them? Are there situations where one of the three ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

The use of “random” to mean “arbitrary”, “unidentified”, “unknown”, etc

I'm seeing the use of "random" instead of "arbitrary", etc., with increasing frequency. To me, "random" has a specific meaning and is not synonymous with these other words. Is it correct to use it in ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Why “mind” means “pay attention to”

Why the word "mind" can be used as a verb, synonym of "pay attention to"? It has the same etymology of the "mind" (centre of thought, feelings, brain) noun? When it is better to use "mind" in place of ...
34
votes
5answers
21k views

What are the differences between “assume”, “presume” and “suppose”

I believe that "assume", "presume", "suppose" are similar in meaning of to take some facts as a truth without proof. But it seems to me that "presume" is more formal, "assume" is less formal and ...