A synonym is a word that means the same, or almost the same thing, as another word.

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Differences between “propensity”, “predilection” and “proclivity”

Propensity, predilection and proclivity all have the meaning of tendency, so what's the difference? Are they interchangeable?
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20answers
3k views

A synonym for “soft” with a negative connotation

I'm looking for a synonym for soft, as in the opposite of coarse or crass. The context is a young French woman in Nazi Germany who asks a shopkeeper for something to catch a mouse in her house. The ...
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10answers
1k views

Word for energyless-ness

What's a single word that can connote the concept of (or something similar to) "energyless-ness" (which, as far as I can tell, is not a word). This is meant to be used in the context of burnout. When ...
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6answers
1k views

Other words for the cadaverous blue?

I am looking for the particular word (if it exists in English) for the ghastly blue colour of a dead person...
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3answers
1k views

Is there an adjective form of Jubilee?

With the Queen Elizabeth II's 60 years on the throne approaching, I'm seeing the word Jubilee more frequently than normal. Is there a word to describe the people celebrating with the same root as the ...
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6answers
4k views

What is the name of the small containers of half & half, etc.?

Does anyone know what the word/name for the small plastic cup things that contain liquids (like half and half for coffee) is? Right now I’m using sachet because a coworker started to do so, but I’ve ...
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4answers
2k views

50s synonym for “snogging”

What would the British term in 1954 have been for "snogging"? "Making out" is American. "All over each other" doesn't seem quite specific enough.
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5answers
1k views

What's a less obscure word for “sinecure”?

I'm writing a message which will go out to a global community, so I want to keep the vocabulary relatively straightforward. I'm describing a job which previously has been a little vaguely-defined, but ...
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4answers
14k views

What are alternative responses for when someone sneezes?

Question: What is an appropriate English response to reply when someone nearby sneezes? Background: I am American by birth, and was raised to respond 'God Bless You' when someone sneezes -- though I ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “onerous” and “arduous”?

Is there any difference in the meaning of these words? Which one of them is used the most in everyday conversation? In my vocabulary for both words I've found essentially the same meaning: "difficult ...
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4answers
6k views

Not to Mention ≈ [Let Alone ≈ Much Less ≈ Still Less]

For brevity, I symbolise synonymity with ≈.  So  X ≈ Y  means  X and Y are synonyms. From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/let+alone: let alone ≈ not to mention From Merriam Webster: let alone ≈ ...
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5answers
6k views

“Bash” vs. “party”

Our management team ask us to join a pizza/beer bash, which is essentially nothing but a pizza lunch held for all employees. My concept of the word bash still remained somewhere near the name of the ...
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4answers
9k views

What's the difference between orthography and spelling?

The terms "spelling" and "orthography" seem to be largely synonymous. What is the difference really? Is it that "orthography" is a more formal or technical term and hence more well-defined? Or is it ...
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4answers
11k views

What's the difference between superpose and superimpose?

The definitions seem very much alike: superposed - Place (something) on or above something else, esp. so that they coincide: "superposed triangles". superimpose - Place or lay (one thing) ...
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2answers
2k views

Why “mind” means “pay attention to”

Why the word "mind" can be used as a verb, synonym of "pay attention to"? It has the same etymology of the "mind" (centre of thought, feelings, brain) noun? When it is better to use "mind" in place of ...
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4answers
15k views

Is there any difference between 'often' and 'frequently'?

Do both mean exactly the same or do they have slightly different meanings?
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3answers
4k views

A word that describes “false sense of knowing” [duplicate]

Is there a word that describes someone having a false sense of knowing? In other words, one believes he knows X, but X isn't true. Here is an example sentence: However, consent forms give ...
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8answers
2k views

A single word antonym of “absorb”

In textbooks, they say "absorb" heat and "give off" heat. Is there a single word which can perfectly take the place of "give off"?
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8answers
30k views

What are the metaphorical ways to say that someone has died? [closed]

What are the metaphorical ways to say that someone has died? For example "He has gone to the far country where he will be happy for ages". P.S. There is this question, but it focuses on mentioning ...
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11answers
1k views

“Calling a spade a spade”: synonymous expressions?

I'm looking for expressions that are equivalent to "calling a spade a spade." In some environments and verbal contexts, this phrase needs to be avoided -- please take my word for it. Thank ...
8
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3answers
987 views

Difference between “dawn” and “realize”

I encountered a word dawn and I have a feeling I understood the meaning in context. For example, 1) It dawned on him that she had loved him. means 2) It entered his consciousness that she ...
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19answers
19k views

Single word to describe something that is “meant to be”

I am trying to come up with a single word that describes the saying "meant to be" in a poetic and prophetic manner (but I am not looking for a fantastical description that talks too much about fate). ...
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8answers
21k views

Synonym for not taking personal responsibility

I'm trying to think of a word that suggests a person who takes no personal accountability in their actions or always tries to shift blame on to some factor supposedly outside of their control. Is ...
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8answers
245 views

Word that means “Something only a philosopher would argue with”

I remember reading (apparently not on the internet) a lighthearted definition of the word I want to use. This noun means a kind of quibble that is so trivial that only a metaphysician or similar ...
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7answers
951 views

Another word for “understated sexuality”?

I am trying to find a proper word for describing a visual concept. At the moment the closest description is "understated sexuality", but maybe there is another word to describe a woman that is ...
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5answers
732 views

What is the word for “a series of two related works”?

Here dilogy is defined as "a series of two related works". I can't shake off the feeling that there is a more commonly used word for this. Is there? If yes, what is it?
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10answers
724 views

What to call the attitude of pursuing something

What will you call a person with an endless spirit of pursuing something?
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6answers
28k views

Is “sans” a drop-in replacement for “without”?

I keep hearing people use the word sans in place of without which causes me to cringe. Can sans really be used as a drop-in replacement? Examples: "I prefer cheeseburgers sans pickles." "I ...
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8answers
18k views

Synonyms for “anal retentive”

I would like one or more synonyms for anal retentive. I was chatting last night in an mmorpg, and any message with the word anal was banned. I ended up talking about my canal retentive minus c ...
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7answers
16k views

Difference between “socket” and “outlet”

While translating a technical document I began thinking about socket and outlet. It seems like they're mostly interchangeable. Is that correct? Or is there a difference between the two?
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3answers
391 views

Is healthful considered an acceptable synonym of healthy?

To my ear, healthful does not sound right. This could well be geographical bias on my part. Is it now a valid alternative to healthy? Does it have another meaning?
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6answers
1k views

Is there a better term for 'low-level?'

In computer programming, low-level means something used as a base upon which to build more complex mechanisms. To the untrained ear, I think the term might imply inferiority, which is simply not the ...
8
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3answers
677 views

Synonymity of “simple” and “basic”

If I have two ways of doing the same thing, one requiring more input or effort than the other but also allowing for more customization, how should I label the two? The simple way and the custom ...
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5answers
6k views

A word for “rate of change”

Physics problems are usually written like: The rate of change of the soup's temperature ... Is there a common English word that captures "rate of change" or "speed of change" in a single word, ...
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5answers
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Argentine or Argentinian?

I was taught in my school days that Argentine was the correct adjective for something relating to the country Argentina. However, these days, even in common speech (but moreover in formal English on ...
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4answers
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What are some synonyms for 'euphemism'?

A euphemism is a word used to replace another worse sounding word. For example, 'pass away' for 'die', 'battle fatigue' for 'shell shock', 'PTSD' for 'battle fatigue', often a word created to replace ...
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3answers
3k views

Differences between “tutorial”, “guide” and “how-to”

The categorization on Android Wiki looks pretty arbitrary and redundant to me contemplating the single articles in the categories. In every one you find a tutorial, guide and how-to on for example How ...
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7answers
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What's the difference between the universe and the cosmos?

Is there a difference between the universe and the cosmos? I used to think that the cosmos was a sort of container for the universe, one that could contain potentially infinite universes.
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5answers
27k views

Difference between “humble” and “modest”

What is the difference between humble and modest? I saw one difference here. Is that true? Any other difference?
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3answers
985 views

Better term for “intellectual jokes”

What can you call a joke, pun, or anything funny that likely needs intelligence to get? All I can come up with is intellectual jokes; is there another word for this? A one-word answer would be great. ...
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6answers
10k views

Is there an alternative, one-word name for the question mark?

Is there an alternative name for the question mark? For example, the exclamation point is often called a bang, the number symbol is called a pound sign or sharp symbol and the asterisk symbol is ...
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5answers
829 views

Can “paper bag” mean any bag?

Being Swedish but living in Kenya for many years I initially reacted when at the local market I was offered a paper bag (verbally) but given a plastic bag (physically). This is always the case and ...
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3answers
2k views

What do you call the green slippery thing formed, due to standing in water?

I can only think of "algae" or preferably "green algae", these are in the context of science. But is there any other general word in English used for this green slippery thing? In Hindi we say, ...
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5answers
27k views

“Last Name” and “surname”

Between last name and surname, which one is British and which one is American? If I talk with somebody from Great Britain, which one is preferable?
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6answers
655 views

Is there a better word or phrase for “somewhat ostentatious”?

Certain graduates of a class are donating money to place an ad in a booklet celebrating s school’s centennial. Their names will be placed in the ad. The intent of the ad (and sale of the booklet) is ...
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7answers
6k views

Is there a word for one who enjoys to eat for the sake of eating (a food hedonist)?

Does such a word exist? I don't mean to excess (IE, a glutton), but rather one who eats because he enjoys eating. Essentially, I'm looking for a word that's synonymous with "a food hedonist", or "a ...
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3answers
1k views

Gender-independent replacement for “fiancée” and “fiancé”

I can use child to replace son or daughter, sibling for sister or brother, and parent for mother or father. What is the unisex replacement for fiancée and fiancé? I don’t need it for speech, but for ...
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4answers
923 views

Synonym for tsunami

I'm looking for an equivalent term in English for tsunami. How did people name/describe the phenomenon prior to 1868 -the first time the word was recorded in English according to Etymonline bearing in ...
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4answers
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Usage of diffuse vs. defuse

I often hear phrases such as "infantry were sent in to diffuse/defuse the situation," and I am never quite sure which people are saying, and which is correct. Both seem to make sense. To me (a ...
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9answers
2k views

Is there any difference between “a few relatives” and “a few relations”?

In the following sentence I prefer saying relatives but I am unable to explain why. It's going to be a small wedding. Only a few friends and relatives have been invited On doing research I ...