2
votes
5answers
101 views

Single word for “at one's wits' end”

While there often appears to be a word that could replace an idiom or a phrase in meaning, this one seems to be an exception (for me that is). I've tried: Confused : Less powerful, isn't it? ...
0
votes
4answers
528 views

Word or phrase for someone who annoys you as soon as they walk in and start talking

Looking for both a journalistic and perhaps playful term. In a journalistic sense, how would I describe a CEO figure who holds a company meeting and the employees are either annoyed, bored, or rolling ...
3
votes
5answers
886 views

What does “pave the path for” mean?

what does pave the idiom "pave the path for sth/sb" actually means? and if possible, please provide some alternatives with the same meaning as well.
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Displaying two things scaled differently - ratio?

If got a picture that displays things. As thing A is alot bigger than thing B, I have downsized A. Not mentioning this size adjustment may confuse viewers and transport a wrong message. How can I tell ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Synonym for “raise the bar”

Is there another way to express "raise the bar"? The context I'm looking for would fit this sentence: A firewall raises the bar for would-be attackers.
12
votes
7answers
965 views

Other ways to say “I have a bad hunch”

I'm looking for ways to say "I'm having a bad hunch", or more like a bad feeling about something upcoming. The gut-wrenching feeling that something bad will happen.
1
vote
3answers
254 views

Action of unintentionally leading someone into concluding something

Imagine a situation where one sees a woman without being aware of her surroundings and concludes wrongly something about her and the group she is a part of. For example, the person sees the writings ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

“Make sure to” vs. “Be sure to”: Is the first one correct?

These two versions below are used interchangeably where I live now in the United States: Make sure to do something. Be sure to do something. But I always have found the first version clumsy. I ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

What is the difference between “in times of” and “in time of”

All the two phrases, "in time of" and " in times of" are in use on the Internet. But I can not distinguish between them correctly. Here are some examples I have come across: How did Hawkwood ...
3
votes
2answers
199 views

Are there any idiomatic expressions similar to “dig one's way”? [closed]

Please look at the usage in the following context: He has spent his life as a treasure hunter, a real-life Indiana Jones who has bought, sold, traded, and dug his way to a peerless collection of ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is there such a thing as an idiom thesaurus that delivers synonymous phrases? [closed]

Is there a resource that anyone knows of that is a searchable idiom list that can provide synonymous phrases for idioms. For example, I saw on your site: step-by-step, day-by-day, inch-by-inch, and ...
0
votes
1answer
373 views

Can “an act of protest” and “a sign of protest” be used interchangeably? Are they idioms that are synonymous to each other? [closed]

Can "an act of protest" and "a sign of protest" be used interchangeably? Are there contexts where one of these phrases should be used, and not the other? Also, are "act of protest" and "sign of ...
2
votes
3answers
832 views

More formal word for “mover and shaker”

Is there a more formal word or phrase for mover and shaker? Single word is preferred.
5
votes
11answers
23k views

What words can I use to indicate how hungry I am?

Besides "I'm hungry" and "I'm starving", where starving is more than hungry, are there other phrases to indicate how hungry you are (including slangs, if any)?
1
vote
5answers
1k views

Are “zugzwang”, “catch-22” and “catch-33” synonyms?

Are these words synonyms? zugzwang — a situation where one player is put at a disadvantage because he has to make a move when he would prefer to pass and make no move catch-22 — a ...
5
votes
2answers
9k views

What alternative would you suggest to “in/with regard(s?) to”?

I see in many of the "corporate emails" I receive the expression: "in regard to". Sometimes, it is also written "in regards to". First, to be sure: "in regards to" (with an extra 's') is ...