1
vote
1answer
24 views

Is addendum synonymous to supplement?

What's the difference between addendum and supplement? The way I see it they both mean pretty much the same thing. It's something added to something else to complete it. I think supplement can be used ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

Difference between elucidate and explicate

I read the definitions of these two terms rendered by various dictionaries and concluded that elucidate denotes 'to make perspicuous or intelligible (especially by explanation)'; whereas, explicate ...
1
vote
1answer
408 views

Difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”

What is the difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”? I found these questions: Difference between “aim” and “purpose” Difference between “purpose” and ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

Difference between use of “ephemeral” and “transient”?

What are some differences between the ways/contexts in which one would use "ephemeral" versus "transient", and vice versa?
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Corresponding vs. appropriate

Let me give you some context first: Germans. We may have similar words with different meanings and use words just because they have a similar spelling. software company, writing software for ...
3
votes
2answers
215 views

Contemplate vs consider

After reading an article recently, I wondered when one should use contemplate over consider. I searched for the issue on Google and found that: In that context, they're essentially the same. ...
2
votes
2answers
204 views

“accuracy” or “accurateness”? [closed]

Do "accuracy" and "accurateness" have the exact same meaning? When is one of them preferred over the other one? "accurateness" does not exist as an entry in Oxford Dictionary of English and Longman ...
0
votes
2answers
104 views

Difference between “repress” and “quell” [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between repress and quell? Are they interchangeable?
2
votes
1answer
301 views

The difference between slick and sleek

What is the difference between the two adjectives: slick and sleek? My dictionary returns almost the same explanation for both, like smooth and glossy. Could someone explain when it would be more ...
0
votes
2answers
831 views

Is there any difference between “student” or “pupil”? [duplicate]

I am a little bit confused, when somebody told me that a student is the same as a pupil. Would it be correct, if I said "He is a pupil of MBA."? Which of the following expressions is the most ...
0
votes
2answers
117 views

Asceticism vs. Monasticism

What is the difference between asceticism and monasticism? It seems that in practice they are effectively synonymous; if this is the case, do they have differing origins? I've included the first ...
0
votes
1answer
387 views

Words with the suffix -duce

deduce = 1. arrive at (a fact or a conclusion) by reasoning; draw as a logical conclusion: educe = 1.1. infer (something) from data: induce = 4. Logic derive by inductive reasoning: ...
0
votes
2answers
231 views

any differences between fund and funding when used as a noun?

Are there any differences between fund and funding when used as a noun? They seem both to have a meaning of "money made available for a particular purpose", and I was wondering why we need "funding" ...
0
votes
1answer
255 views

Mob/Riot/Protest?

There are three words that I know that refer to groups of people in the public: mob, riot and protest. What is the difference between these words? Are there other words with similar meanings? Also, ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Difference between the use of “supplier”, “vendor”, “provider”

Which is the difference between the use of supplier, vendor, provider? The way I see it, they are complete synonyms. Am I right?
7
votes
9answers
809 views

Is there any difference between “a few relatives” and “a few relations”?

In the following sentence I prefer saying relatives but I am unable to explain why. It's going to be a small wedding. Only a few friends and relatives have been invited On doing research I ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Difference between contract and catch [a disease]

What could be the difference between contracting a disease and catching a disease? I know there isn't any big difference. However, it looks like there are some diseases you can both catch and ...
0
votes
1answer
154 views

Preference vs Favoritism

Could anyone please explain the subtle difference between preference and favoritism? Both of them basically give the same meaning, but there is something more than that in it. Can someone point that ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

Isle vs. Island

Some islands are called isle like "Isle of Man", "Isle of Tortuga" and the "British Isles". Other islands are called island, like "Island of Malta" or "Island of Cyprus". What is the difference ...
3
votes
6answers
4k views

Difference between “dumb” and “stupid”

A friend and I had a disagreement about something, in which he called one of my statements "dumb". As we were talking through the disagreement, it got a little heated and I tried repeating what he had ...
3
votes
3answers
690 views

Difference between flooding and inundation? [closed]

flooding vs. inundation Watching the News, I noticed that the above two words are a bit different. Some Disaster Management organization has one of its goals listed as To prevent inundation and ...
7
votes
7answers
635 views

Do synonyms exactly stand for the same

I have a question about synonyms: I'm wondering for quite a while if synonyms always stand exactly for the same thing. Is there sometimes a little difference in meaning? Let's use clumsy and clunky ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “meat” and “flesh”? [closed]

When do we use "meat" and when do we use "flesh"? I think the difference is very subtle: maybe meat refers to food, and flesh to human or animal bodies, but as English is not my mother tongue, I want ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between “skills”, “abilities”, and “talents”? [closed]

Are there differences in meaning of the words "skills", "abilities", and "talents" within the context of describing what a person can do?
2
votes
3answers
1k views

“Pace” vs. “speed”

Is there a difference between "pace" and "speed"? I have a feeling that with "speed" we usually specify the actual value, while with "pace" we talk more relatively. Am I right?
5
votes
2answers
6k views

“via” vs. “through”

Could you please explain what the difference in usage is between through and via, which sounds like a Latinism? Are they completely interchangeable?
1
vote
1answer
5k views

What is the difference between “synergistic” and “synergetic”?

What is the difference between "synergistic" and "synergetic"? I believe they both speak of the cooperation of multiple things to produce an output, but how do they differ?
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference between seed, nut, kernel, pit, grain

I was reading on a food package that it contained seeds AND grains. I thought, aren't they the same thing? I thougth for a second and it seems like the following are all the same thing: Seed (as in ...
5
votes
3answers
735 views

“Intended” vs. “intentional”

I'm reading an article about intention recognition in computing areas and somehow robotics. I came across this sentence: This problem has been discussed as the difference between “intended and ...
4
votes
4answers
754 views

“Ideal” vs “archetype” vs “role model” vs “prototype”

While learning synonyms, I encountered these words. I'm trying to understand the nuances between them. From my understanding:- Role model is someone whom you admire or try to emulate (generally a ...
14
votes
2answers
2k views

Envision vs Envisage

Is there a context where envision is not a synonym of envisage, or vice versa? Envisage's definition: contemplate or conceive of as a possibility or a desirable future event Envision's ...
0
votes
1answer
386 views

Can “an act of protest” and “a sign of protest” be used interchangeably? Are they idioms that are synonymous to each other? [closed]

Can "an act of protest" and "a sign of protest" be used interchangeably? Are there contexts where one of these phrases should be used, and not the other? Also, are "act of protest" and "sign of ...
6
votes
2answers
645 views

“feint” and “feign”: Are they synomyms?

Both to feign and to feint seem to mean to pretend. Are they synonyms or the same word with only a different spelling? Or is there an actual concrete difference in their meaning?
7
votes
3answers
7k views

What's the difference between superpose and superimpose?

The definitions seem very much alike: superposed - Place (something) on or above something else, esp. so that they coincide: "superposed triangles". superimpose - Place or lay (one thing) ...
-2
votes
1answer
671 views

What's the difference between micro-particle and micron-particle? [closed]

A simple Google search gave me: Micro-particle 564,000 Micron-particle 309,000 Are they interchangeable or is there a difference between the two? Here is an example: Air filters remove dust, ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Does “fare” apply to non-persons?

If one pays for transportation of oneself a fare has been paid. What is paid if the transportation is of a non-person object (a parcel, a letter, a vegetable, a box of rocks)?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Is *race* a synonym of *species* or is just a common mistake?

It's very common -- specially in fantasy and science-fiction -- to use race instead of species. For example: “In Middle Earth (...) Aragorn (race: men) (...) Bilbo (race: hobbit)” 1 “Tarkin's ...
4
votes
4answers
447 views

'to dither' as synonym for 'to hesitate'?

The verb to dither means to hesitate about what to do because you are unable to decide The verb to hesitate means to be slow to speak or act because you feel uncertain or nervous The usage of to ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Distinction between “ambulate” and “perambulate”?

At a cursory glance, these two terms appear to be synonyms. But that would strike me as unusual since one is a prefixed form of the other. (Prefixes are used to modify a word in a specific and ...
15
votes
5answers
16k views

Differences between “sledge”, “sleigh” and “sled”

Is there a difference between a sledge, a sleigh and a sled? Dictionary definitions suggest they are synonymous, but it certainly sounds wrong to refer to Santa Claus on a sledge.
13
votes
5answers
19k views

Difference between “pain” and “ache”

What's the difference between pain and ache? I often see the two words used (almost) interchangeably. At the same time the phrase "aches and pains" is pretty common, and seems to suggest that the two ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Differences between “tutorial”, “guide” and “how-to”

The categorization on Android Wiki looks pretty arbitrary and redundant to me contemplating the single articles in the categories. In every one you find a tutorial, guide and how-to on for example How ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Why are “connection” and “connexion” both used in the same work?

This question, Google Ngrams, Wikipedia, and several dictionaries all say that connexion is an alternate, obsolete spelling of connection. I am reading a several-hundred page treatise (Milton S. ...
12
votes
11answers
1k views

Cases where “mistake” and “error” are not interchangeable

Are there cases where error and mistake are not interchangeable?
2
votes
3answers
4k views

What's the difference between “act” and “action”?

What's the difference between "act" and "action"? More specifically in the way they are generally used (and not more specific theatrical definitions, for instance)?
8
votes
3answers
11k views

Differences between “propensity”, “predilection” and “proclivity”

Propensity, predilection and proclivity all have the meaning of tendency, so what's the difference? Are they interchangeable?
4
votes
4answers
20k views

What's the difference between “my love” and “my lover”?

What's the difference between "my love" and "my lover" ? Or do they have the same meaning ?
7
votes
2answers
5k views

Difference between lexicon and dictionary

What is the difference between a lexicon and a dictionary? Is a lexicon just an über-big dictionary?
4
votes
1answer
492 views

“Injure” vs. “damage”

I have injured my ankle. I have damaged my ankle. Could you tell me the difference? How can I use injured/damaged correctly?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a difference between “continual” and “continuous”?

They are very close in meaning, I know, but I want to know if there are any subtle differences. Let me give you an example of a subtle difference in meaning between synonyms: Deceitful vs. ...