-1
votes
5answers
116 views

One word that can be used to represent Weak student?

Is there a word/term in English that describes a student that has bad grades, weak performance... I am writing a PhD thesis so I need a word that can be understood by native and non-native English ...
4
votes
5answers
454 views

Adjective describing someone who is in constant communication with someone else?

I'm searching for a good synonym for communicative, but with an emphasis on being in constant communication over time, not merely the "amount" of communication (so talkative and such don't work). A ...
6
votes
3answers
587 views

“desert island” versus “deserted island”

What is the difference between "a desert island" and "a deserted island"? Are they synonyms?
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Word for a person who lives in the past

Someone who is highly nostalgic and is stuck in the past, better days
-1
votes
3answers
108 views

The state of not progressing [closed]

What is the state of not progressing called? Going in circles. When the person is not progressing despite the active trying.
1
vote
2answers
429 views

Words that describe the repetitive sound of machine [closed]

I'm looking for words that can describe the repetitive sounds that machine produces (For example an engine). Those droning, looped and long-lasting sounds. Patterned sounds of various parts of an ...
1
vote
3answers
158 views

Relationship between “ductile” and “malleable”

What is the relationship between the words ductile and malleable? They are definitely not antonyms, but can we call them synonyms?
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Difference between “dumb” and “stupid”

A friend and I had a disagreement about something, in which he called one of my statements "dumb". As we were talking through the disagreement, it got a little heated and I tried repeating what he had ...
0
votes
3answers
75 views

Softer word for “validated”

I'm looking for a word with less certainty than "validated", as in Has this testimony been validated? I'd like something like "sanity checked" which flows better. Any suggestions?
0
votes
1answer
174 views

Alternative for “full-fledged”

I am looking for an alternative for "full-fledged". Mister X systematised its use and meaning, and developed the notion into a full-fledged concept of ... The context is academic, but not ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Adjective describing a person who does work to get it done

I have a friend who always goes on that I have a bad work ethic, though I am not lazy. At the same time, he says he has a good work ethic, but is lazy. The definition of having a good work ethic is ...
3
votes
3answers
549 views

Lexically recognized synonym for “humblebrag”?

As one might guess, a humblebrag is one who uses a pretense of humility as a vehicle for boasting. This word can be found at Urban Dictionary but, it appears, nowhere more authoritative. Yet, of ...
4
votes
7answers
922 views

“Crack” as a positive noun?

Some Spanish speakers use the word crack as a positive noun. For example: Lionel Messi es un crack del football! Is it the same in English? Can I say: You're a crack?
1
vote
0answers
3k views

“Particular” vs. “specific” [closed]

The Free Dictionary lists particular and specific as synonyms, but there still seems to be a subtle distinction between the two. What is that distinction? In a phrase along the lines of: the ...
2
votes
2answers
391 views

What is another way of saying “less premium?”

I'm looking for another way to say "less premium." This is the context: The competition's brand was less premium. I do not want to change the overall structure of the sentence. This is not a ...
0
votes
3answers
551 views

Synonym for “aforementioned” without the past-tense connotation [closed]

Is there a word that can be used when discussing something and wanting to refer to it in the manner of "the aforementioned", but without the temporal aspect making it sound like you've moved on and ...
5
votes
3answers
546 views

“Intended” vs. “intentional”

I'm reading an article about intention recognition in computing areas and somehow robotics. I came across this sentence: This problem has been discussed as the difference between “intended and ...
1
vote
1answer
496 views

Is “Fellow” informal? If yes, what's a formal equivalent?

In this article I read that: Fellow – Avoid using "fellow" when you mean "a person." Calling someone a fellow is more formal than calling him or her a dude, but "fellow" is still a colloquialism. ...
9
votes
3answers
868 views

Is there an adjective form of Jubilee?

With the Queen Elizabeth II's 60 years on the throne approaching, I'm seeing the word Jubilee more frequently than normal. Is there a word to describe the people celebrating with the same root as the ...
1
vote
3answers
397 views

Adjective & Adverbial forms of “Conspiracy” [closed]

I tried looking up its synonyms (plot, scheme) and then their adjectives, but they didn't quite cut it. Any word that can be used as its adjective and adverb? The place that I would like to use it ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

Word or phrase for making something seem better by comparison

What is a word or phrase that expresses the idea of purposely making something seem better by comparison? For example, lemon Starburst was created to make the cherry flavor seem that much tastier.
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Synonym for “focused”

I'm looking for a better adjective that means focused in the sense of "intense concentration" like an elite warrior in battle. I guess it doesn't even need the sense of having blinders on, more about ...
3
votes
4answers
310 views

What alternatives are there to 'de-facto?'

I'm looking to describe something that people use for no particular reason, other than that other people use it. It is popular because it is popular. De-facto seemed like a good fit at first, but my ...
3
votes
2answers
708 views

Equivalent for “inhumane” in regard to animals

It's probably appropriate to use the word inhumane when referring to the improper treatment of animals, but I was just curious if there was another term in the English language that refers to the ...
8
votes
4answers
6k views

Argentine or Argentinian?

I was taught in my school days that Argentine was the correct adjective for something relating to the country Argentina. However, these days, even in common speech (but moreover in formal English on ...
3
votes
2answers
142 views

Are “misty-eyed” and “misty” interchangeable?

Today, I came across a pair of sentences using these terms: And while people may get misty-eyed about the "open web", or the "neutral net", this kind of utopianism was always naive in the extreme. ...
20
votes
17answers
4k views

Noun for “person with intermediate skill”

I'm looking for the noun form of "person with intermediate skill". For example, in the context of a particular activity, "person with no skill" might be designated a novice, and "person with much ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference between “notable” and “noteworthy”

Which would be more appropriate in this case? I currently do not have any affiliation that would be notable in the context of this election I currently do not have any affiliation that would ...
5
votes
3answers
630 views

A positive alternative to “smelling” to describe something with a pleasant odor

When one hears that something smells, one would generally assume that it smells bad. Isn't there a word which wouldn't bring to mind the idea of a bad odor? For example, how would you describe ...
2
votes
3answers
767 views

Is there any adjective synonymous to “to the point”?

Is there any adjective synonymous to "to the point"? For example, "Jack's and Jill's answers are quite to-the-point, but Mary's answer is the most-to-the-point one" EDIT: A better example: ...
0
votes
3answers
307 views

Adjective describing the “finiteness” of something

I'm trying to find another term which means "finiteness". To me, it sounds too clumsy. Part of my mind gesticulates wildly toward a "-cy" suffix word to describe this, like "captaincy" or "valency"... ...
3
votes
10answers
2k views

What other word can we use in place of “helpless”

I am looking for an English word I can use sometimes in place of helpless. I have the word in my language, but I am not able to find it in English. The word which we say sometimes if we feel that we ...
6
votes
5answers
7k views

What is a good substitute for “echoey”?

As in "an echoey room". People do use this word in speech, but it isn't proper in writing. I thought of "echoing", but that implies that something is currently making an echo, whereas what I'm ...
0
votes
2answers
870 views

Synonyms and antonyms for “lacking” or “missing” when something is mandatory

I am searching for the correct term usage in my Java code, although you don't need to know anything about programming to answer my question. My "something" can be "required" (mandatory) or not ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Differences between “vulgar” and “coarse”, “crass”, “crude”, “rough”, “rude”, “unrefined” as applied to language

This question specifically covers how these terms are used to describe language, it is a followup to What's the difference between "informal", "colloquial", "slang", ...
5
votes
7answers
190 views

Is “unredactable” a word?

I googled it and even though it's been used on the Web, I can't find any entries for it on online dictionaries. If it's not a real word, then is there a good equivalent? The context is a record ...
3
votes
6answers
2k views

Positive-sounding substitute for “dull”/“boring”?

I was recently writing a testimonial, and I wanted a positive substitute for those words. The adjective is for describing the guy in question (i.e. He is a _____ guy). Any ideas?
3
votes
2answers
10k views

“Auxiliary” or “ancillary”

I am trying to phrase something like: We argue that introducing these concepts is likely to achieve ancillary goals. Should I use auxiliary or ancillary here? Is there a difference in meaning?
6
votes
6answers
1k views

Terms to apply to something that leaves strong memory

Do the following terms have positive, neutral or negative meaning? memorable impressive remarkable What are other similar terms that are used for positive, neutral and negative intention?
8
votes
8answers
11k views

Synonyms for “anal retentive”

I would like one or more synonyms for anal retentive. I was chatting last night in an mmorpg, and any message with the word anal was banned. I ended up talking about my canal retentive minus c ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between “onerous” and “arduous”?

Is there any difference in the meaning of these words? Which one of them is used the most in everyday conversation? In my vocabulary for both words I've found essentially the same meaning: "difficult ...
7
votes
13answers
48k views

What is the adjective form for the word “integrity?”

I'm looking for the adjective form of "integrity." Instead of "Be a person of integrity," I'd like to say something like "Be [one word I'm looking for]" I did a Google search for this, but I also ...
4
votes
3answers
779 views

A word for the meaning of “over-constrained”

I want to express that I constrained something too much such that it is contradictory now. At first sight, over-constrained seems to fit, but I am not sure whether it is fine to use in a scientific ...
27
votes
3answers
3k views

Why are not “infamous” and “inflammable” the opposite of “famous” and “flammable”?

Why are not infamous and inflammable the opposite of famous and flammable, like incomplete, inactivity, inappropriate and so on?