The form of an adjective or adverb ending with "-est" or "most".

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4
votes
1answer
249 views

Is “workingest” used as often and casually as “hardest working” and “the most hard working (or industrious)”?

I found the phrase America is “the workingest nation” on earth in the following sentence of Time magazine’s (November 14) article titled “Whatever happened to upward mobility.” For the first time ...
7
votes
4answers
604 views

“Highest building of/in the world”

Which is correct? The Chrysler building was the highest building in the world. Today, it is the seventh highest building in the USA. or: The Chrysler building was the highest building of ...
5
votes
2answers
334 views

What are general rules to form this superlatives: “adjective + most”?

I happen to find superlatives with the structure below: Adjective + most, which are: the rearmost, the frontmost, the uppermost, the headmost, the outermost, the topmost, etc. What are the ...
6
votes
3answers
792 views

superlative + -ing participle + noun ok?

Is it always ok to have a superlative hyphenated with a present participle ending in -ing acting as an adjective (so long as the superlative describes the base verb of the participle)? For example: ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is the superlative of “fun”? [closed]

I've seen funniest a few times in that context, but isn't that a derivation of funny? Is there a superlative of fun or do we really use funniest for the lack of one?
5
votes
3answers
937 views

Superlatives with “the”

What is the rule regarding using the with superlatives? For example: John is the fastest among his friends. John is fastest among his friends. Both appear to be correct. I have seen ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Do I need to put “the” before “most” in this sentence?

Is putting “the” before “most” in this sentence compulsory, optional, or a mistake? Fascination with language and attention to particular regions and communities in America are the most common ...
1
vote
0answers
130 views

Using superlatives for comparing two things [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of the superlative when only two items are present Is it strictly incorrect to use the superlative when comparing only two things? i.e. I have two sisters. Mary ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Which word you would choose as a superlative of “wrong”?

Which word you would choose as a superlative of "wrong"?
5
votes
5answers
433 views

How can I express “bottom” superlative?

Suppose you have some elements (let's say coins) laid out over a table in vertical order. How can I make reference to the coin at the bottom? The lowest coin? The one that is below any other? I just ...
28
votes
3answers
114k views

What's the difference between “eldest” and “oldest”?

When should I use "eldest" and when should I use "oldest"? Are the differences semantic or regional? (Or both?) (What got me wondering is the removeEldestEntry() method in Java's LinkedHashMap ...
1
vote
6answers
4k views

“least” vs. “lowest”

What is the difference between least and lowest? Websites announce as "Lowest prices", but not "least". Least is the superlative degree. low > lower > least ?
6
votes
7answers
4k views

Use of the superlative when only two items are present

When speaking with my mother a couple of days ago, I read to her a message I was sending to my cousin on her behalf ending with: "... the birthday of your youngest." [implying her child] She ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Comparative and superlative adverbs?

I'm a native speaker of English, and I don't know how many times I've wanted to say "happilier" instead of "more happily", or "happiliest" instead of "most happily". Is there any record of such ...
3
votes
1answer
610 views

Rules for single-word comparatives and superlatives [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” Are there any rules for which words are allowed to have ...
15
votes
6answers
38k views

Is “funnest” a word?

We seem to be stuck at an impasse on this issue. Is funnest a word or not? If so, does it mean "most fun"?