A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
2answers
19 views

How can a “noun suffix” be used for words that don't fit into the pattern i.e. “family”? Family-ness? Family-like? Familiality (made up word…)

I am editing a document for someone and they used the word "familiness" to relate to the family-like nature of an organisation. Is there a better word to use than the phrase "family-like nature"?
-1
votes
2answers
737 views

When are Roman Numeral suffixes appropriate for number abbreviations?

This question was asked and closed last year as general reference. However, it did not attract the caliber of answer I expected it to. I suggested the following content as an edit, but it was rejected ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Are products of wordsmithing proper english?

Several languages in which English has its roots have easily definable rules. For example, sticking "A" in from of an adjective can mean the opposite of that adjective (Asymmetrical, symmetrical), ...
1
vote
0answers
179 views

Calibrate + able = Calibratible? Calibratable?

What is the consensus on the correct form of calibrate + able suffix? Wiktionary lists only one proper entry for "calibratable". Automotive industries prefer to use "calibratible" because it matches ...
1
vote
0answers
160 views

In word construction, is there a affix order?

Does english have classes of prefixes and suffixes like it does adjectives, and if so, how are they usually ordered? For example, adjectives usually go in this order (or something like it): ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

is there a name for adjectives that end in -ive formed from verbs?

Examples include 'declarative', 'manipulative', 'accusative'. Is there a name for these adjectives that describe something of or related to their base verb?
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Using -rich suffix

I have to following example phrase: A movie, rich with effects Now I'd like transform it using the "-rich" suffix: Effect-rich movie At first, does such phrase sound natural? If no, is ...