A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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Can an adjective be converted into a noun by '-s'?

I saw a passage "this doesn't mean to get riches and honors." 'rich' is an adjective but 'riches' is a plural noun according to the dictionary. Are there any other examples where an adjective becomes ...
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When are Roman Numeral suffixes appropriate for number abbreviations?

This question was asked and closed last year as general reference. However, it did not attract the caliber of answer I expected it to. I suggested the following content as an edit, but it was rejected ...
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Nouns to adjectives: “-ous” vs. “-ful”

When turning nouns to adjectives, what is the rule for using the suffixes -ous or -ful? Why do pain/harm became painful/harmful and not painous or harmous? Why do glory/nerve become glorious/nervous ...
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Are products of wordsmithing proper english?

Several languages in which English has its roots have easily definable rules. For example, sticking "A" in from of an adjective can mean the opposite of that adjective (Asymmetrical, symmetrical), ...
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The proper usage of 'compeer'; and is it a root word?

Compeer has a definition: A person of equal rank, status or ability What I am asking is what context is this word typically used? And equally important - is it valid to use the words compeering and ...
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Are there suffixes akin to -phobe and -phile that are less extreme in meaning?

The suffix -phobia means fear of, often irrational fear of. For example, according to Wikipedia: Ophidiophobia or ophiophobia is a particular type of specific phobia, the abnormal fear of ...
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Calibrate + able = Calibratible? Calibratable?

What is the consensus on the correct form of calibrate + able suffix? Wiktionary lists only one proper entry for "calibratable". Automotive industries prefer to use "calibratible" because it matches ...
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In word construction, is there a affix order?

Does english have classes of prefixes and suffixes like it does adjectives, and if so, how are they usually ordered? For example, adjectives usually go in this order (or something like it): ...