A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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Why is a woman a “widow” and a man a “widower”?

There are lots of words that have male and female forms, and usually there are alternate suffixes to the words which indicate the gender; for example, "waiter" vs. "waitress", "mister" vs. "mistress", ...
0
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0answers
28 views

The origins of surname suffixs

When did mankind begin using surname suffixes such as Jr. Sr. I II III?
8
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4answers
3k views

When is it appropriate, if at all, to use the suffix “ish”?

When is it appropriate, if at all, to use the suffix ish? Consider the following: She was a largish woman According to Google the word largish is defined as somewhat large. However, ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Dynamicality from Dynamic?

I am using the word 'dynamic' as the following definition from the Merriam Webster's Dictionary. 3. of random-access memory : requiring periodic refreshment of charge in order to retain data The ...
4
votes
3answers
135 views

Terminology for a word containing a prefix/suffix or neither

Does terminology exist for discriminating between words which do/don't contain a prefix/suffix? How could I describe this difference in the synonyms 'discontinue' and 'stop'? Here, 'dis' is a prefix ...
2
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2answers
770 views

Any word followed by “proof” means that something is protected against that word

I was wondering if you combine any word and add "proof" at the and, does that automatically means that it is protected against the first word? For example: Bulletproof - means something that can't ...
4
votes
3answers
7k views

“Hirable” or “hireable”

What is the correct adjective form of the word hire? I have seen references to both hireable and hirable. I checked using Google's Ngram viewer book search and it appears that both have been in use ...
1
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1answer
56 views

Curious about “en-” and “-en” in the same word…

There’s a motorcycle part called the “enrichener.” To my ears, it sounds like the “en-” prefix and “-en” suffix (in the enrichen part of enrichener) are redundant. Of course, there is also ...
0
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3answers
168 views

Why “producing”, not “produccing”? [closed]

Same with "bleeding" and "bleedding". We say "swimming", so why not "bleedding"?
11
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4answers
5k views

Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
0
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3answers
95 views

Is there an -ically suffixed word to describe a duration?

We know about chronologically to describe order by time, but is there a word to describe duration? I want to say something like "school is x-ically taxing", as in, school is heavily taxing on an ...
2
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1answer
153 views

difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
0
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1answer
112 views

Is a stem word required with a prefix and suffix combination?

Suppose the following lexeme: mononess Consisting of the prefix "mono-" (meaning "one") and suffix "-ness" (meaning "the quality of"), but no stem/root word. Could this lexeme be a valid word ...
12
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2answers
838 views

What does the -st word ending mean and is it used in any modern vocabulary?

I know there are plenty of words that use the -st ending: wouldst, whilst, unbeknownst, etc. but I'm not really sure what it means to add an -st suffix to a word. What does it mean to add the suffix? ...
0
votes
2answers
105 views

When are Roman Numeral suffixes appropriate for number abbreviations?

This question was asked and closed last year as general reference. However, it did not attract the caliber of answer I expected it to. I suggested the below content as an edit, but it was rejected for ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

in-able ? un-able?

Suffix -able adds meaning "being able" to a word. I know that. Prefix in- and un- mean "not" or some negative meaning. I know that. However, when it comes to mixing of these, I am confused. ...
11
votes
5answers
1k views

What is the adjectival form of “nemesis”?

If I have a non-person object or idea that I consider to be my nemesis1, how could I refer to the object as a noun but use an embellishing adjective to emphasize that the object is my nemesis? For ...
1
vote
1answer
311 views

Adding a suffix and a prefix to the word “ocean” [closed]

Is it possible to add a prefix to the word ocean? Also, is it possible to add a suffix to it as well?
0
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2answers
48 views

How to write word “hashtagged” using “#” symbol? #ed, #'ed, #-ed?

It looks like #ed would be correct way to write word "hashtagged", but this can be confused with hashtag – #ed. What would be another acceptable way to write word "hashtagged" using # symbol?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Where do “‑ess” and “‑ine” suffixes come from?

English has a lot of words that end in ‑ess or ‑esse, such as actress, hostess, huntress, finesse, duress, prowess, Lyonesse, and Westernesse. That looks like a suffix that is also used frequently ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is “k” added to “panic” when suffixes added (as in “panicky”)?

When adding any suffix to the word "panic," a "k" is added after the "c". Examples: panicked, panicking, panicky. Why is this the case? Are there any other English words that do the same? I'm also ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

Rules for removing last vowel when adding “-able”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When to drop the 'e' when ending in -able? Both are correct for these words: sizable, sizeable sharable, shareable takable, takeable But these words are ...
26
votes
3answers
1k views

What purpose does an '-o' serve?

I have been singing a lot of children’s songs lately, and this afternoon in the car I noticed three songs that add an ‑o to the end of words: “He had many a mile to go that night before he ...
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votes
1answer
49 views

What is the antonym of prospection in the context of seeking reward? [closed]

Currently looking into the effects of neuroscience on decision making. There is the limbic system which is in charge of the seeking of positive reward i.e. prospection. In contrast to this there is ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

What is the difference between the suffixes -ize and -ify

The dictionary ascribes the same purpose to both these suffixes: to denote 'to make, or become'. However, for some neologisms, -ize seems much more appropriate than -ify does, and vice-versa. There ...
2
votes
2answers
205 views

Why does -istic turn some words negative?

The definition of -istic is: Used to form adjectives from nouns, especially nouns in -ist and -ism, with the meaning "of or pertaining to" said nouns. I don't see anything in there that could ...
11
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2answers
528 views

Antonym for gormless?

I was sitting at the card table this evening looking gormless (as I am wont to do) when it occurred to me to wonder, are the other players gormful? Is there such a word? Is there such a thing as gorm, ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Origin of different past tenses for verbs with the same endings?

Why do we have a situation where the past of "to blow" is "blew", but of "to glow" is "glowed"? And don't say "flew" if you mean "it flowed". The poem Lovers, by Phoebe Cary has many examples of ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Why do some words with Latin etymology use -ae suffix while others use the -s? [duplicate]

Why do some words in English with Latin etymology use the suffix -ae while others use the more common -s?
14
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6answers
17k views

Difference between “commentor” and “commentator”

What is the difference between commentor and commentator? Is commentor or commenter a legitimate English word?
8
votes
4answers
3k views

Origin of the “-y” or “-ie” diminutive suffix to denote intimacy/tenderness? (E.g. Bob→Bobby, dad→daddy, Doug→Dougie)

Many names seem to get a "-y" or "-ie" at the end when the speaker wishes to denote a hint of familiarity, intimacy, or tenderness. Examples can be seen not just in names, but in terms like puppy, ...
2
votes
3answers
864 views

Has the suffix “-trix” acquired a pejorative meaning in recent years?

A couple days ago I needed the correct word for a female aviator, which I figured was aviatress. A dictionary.com search provided aviatress, aviatrice and aviatrix as acceptable choices. ...
2
votes
2answers
417 views

What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?

"Xenophobia" is being fearful of outsiders, and "xenophilia" would be to love outsiders. To fit in with these words, I'm looking for a suffix to attach to the "xeno~" prefix to in order to create a ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Mashing parts together to form Philanthropomath [closed]

I've always been unskilled with prefixes, suffixes, roots, etc. I was wondering if I combined philanthrope(ic) and philomath to form Philanthropomath Does this turn into nonsense? Or through the ...
3
votes
4answers
228 views

Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates?

Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates? By 'ordinal suffix' I mean '-th', '-nd', '-rd', e.g. 'April 17' instead of 'April 17th'. If they do, is there an explanation for this behavior?
1
vote
2answers
349 views

Geometric or Geometrical?

I have read the excellent answers to Why is it "geometric" but "theoretical" - my question is specifically about usage. Is there a best practice for deciding between the variants "geometric" and ...
19
votes
9answers
2k views

Opposite of the suffix -less

I'm looking for a suffix that has the opposite meaning of the suffix -less as in stainless. That is, a suffix that means “not free of ...”. In German, for example, there is the adverb “behaftet” and ...
0
votes
3answers
9k views

Meaning of the “rupt” suffix/prefix

I was wondering the other day about the word corrupt, found that the suffix "rupt" appears in many words and as a prefix for another set and decided to ask this question: What does "rupt" mean? ...
-2
votes
1answer
128 views

Signature for Doctor of Information Technology prefix and suffix [closed]

How can I sign my name with the degree of "Doctor of Information Technology" Is this all correct Dr.Full Name Full Name D.I.T Dr Full Name (Doctor of Information Technology) Dr.Last Name Can I ...
10
votes
6answers
19k views

What's the difference between “adviser” and “advisor” — are both interchangeable?

I work for a financial services provider and we deal with "Financial Advisors" all the time. Increasingly, I'm seeing people send emails and so forth with the term "Financial Adviser" and the terms ...
2
votes
2answers
424 views

Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”

How did -hood evolve into the noun-forming suffix commonly used in words such as childhood, priesthood, or neighborhood— and including certain pseudonyms such as robinhood which could easily be ...
4
votes
1answer
191 views

Paramount, tantamount and …?

Paramount: more important than anything else; supreme. Tantamount: equivalent in seriousness to; virtually the same as. ??mount: less important than anything else What is the word ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Suffix order: -lessness vs -nessless

What is the correct order for combinations of suffixes -less and -ness? Are they combined in any order, or is there any rule governing a proper usage? hopelessness helplessness But: ...
14
votes
5answers
21k views

What is the difference between “electric” and “electrical” and their usage?

What is the difference between electric and electrical and their usage? For example, what is the difference between "electrical machine" and "electric machine"?
8
votes
3answers
191 views

Are there any rules/patterns for selecting “ish” vs “like” as a suffix?

This question arose on a comment thread over on ELL. Are there any rules or patterns for when we should/do select "ish" as a suffix, rather than "like"? Some examples discussed were that birdlike ...
1
vote
1answer
716 views

Usage of the noun suffix “-ment”

What is a good rule for the usage of the noun suffix -ment? Is desirement as acceptable as achievement?
0
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3answers
427 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
6
votes
3answers
144 views

Do other suffixes exist for locative and directional 'adverbs'? eg here hither hence

Years ago from JRR Tolkien's The Silmarillion, I learned the delightful suffixes -ence and -ither in the word meanings: hence: from this nearby place hither: toward this nearby place thence: from ...
3
votes
5answers
4k views

Is the suffix “-ette” used for referring to a female?

I recently came across the word scooterette in an Indian newspaper. I wondered if this is an Indian coinage; a quick search on Google showed me it's almost purely Indian. I could not find a reliable ...
13
votes
5answers
26k views

What does the suffix “-saurus” mean?

Is it the same meaning in tyrannosaurus as in thesaurus? I really can’t imagine what those two words could possibly have in common!