A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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5
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4answers
297 views

Adding an L when appending an -ium suffix to a word? (Metallium vs. Metalium)

I am Romanizing a business name from Hebrew, and am wondering what the most appealing or 'correct' spelling might be - 'Metallium' or 'Metalium'. The owners of the business went with the latter, but ...
0
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1answer
110 views

Why do _some_ -phile words have sexual context if phileo means friendship love? [on hold]

Lots of words ending with -phile have a sexual context, yet phileo is a friendship love which has nothing to do with sexual context. Why is that? Is there an innocent, pure, friendly suffix that can ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Where does the suffix “-tine” come from?

Where does the suffix -tine come from? For e.g., Ovaltine, Creatine, etc. all have a -tine suffix. What is the meaning connoted to the noun attached?
4
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0answers
54 views

What's the word for the use of the wrong prefix or suffix?

For example if someone said unliterate instead of illiterate or discluded instead of excluded? Is there a word for this kind of grammatical error?
1
vote
2answers
26 views

How can a “noun suffix” be used for words that don't fit into the pattern i.e. “family”? Family-ness? Family-like? Familiality (made up word…)

I am editing a document for someone and they used the word "familiness" to relate to the family-like nature of an organisation. Is there a better word to use than the phrase "family-like nature"?
102
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11answers
19k views

Is there a suffix like “phile” or “phobe” for don't care?

Thinking that every thing that you can like and dislike, you can also not care about and there may be a suffix for it.
1
vote
3answers
18k views

Meaning of the “rupt” suffix/prefix

I was wondering the other day about the word corrupt, found that the suffix "rupt" appears in many words and as a prefix for another set and decided to ask this question: What does "rupt" mean? ...
2
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0answers
31 views

Watergate and Marathon — Any other invalid, but common back formations? [duplicate]

I was reading a question here about the use of the suffix -gate to denote a political, and later any type, of scandal. This is of course and allusion to the Watergate scandal, which lead to the ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Why do you write setter and getter with double t [duplicate]

If you care, setter (plural: setters) and getter (plural: getters) are parts of a computer programms that get (or retrieve) and set (or store) values in memory. But why do you write that words, that ...
16
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2answers
1k views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Is -age as in garage, mirage, barrage a suffix?

So -age as in bondage, message is a suffix since it's active in creating non-Norman words such as shrinkage (with the Saxon stem shrink), slippage (Saxon slip). What about the more recent -age as in ...
5
votes
2answers
747 views

What's the adjective from 'emit'? [closed]

I'd like to know what's the right adjective from the word 'to emit'. Is is emitting or emitted radiation? Or are they both used interchangeably?
0
votes
0answers
30 views

is there a name for adjectives that end in -ive formed from verbs?

Examples include 'declarative', 'manipulative', 'accusative'. Is there a name for these adjectives that describe something of or related to their base verb?
0
votes
1answer
25 views

-er vs -ing when characterizing someone

For example someone wants to use both their nationality and occupation in their nickname (e.g. serb and coder), what is a better choice: coding serb coder serb I understand basic semantic ...
3
votes
5answers
4k views

No coffee, no workee - meaning

No coffee, no workee What does that expression exactly mean? And how do you pronounce it?
3
votes
3answers
358 views

Is “demonstratee” a legitimate word?

Is demonstratee a legitimate word? None of the usual sources think so, but it seems like -ee should be a productive suffix. If it isn't, is there another word that can be used in reference to the ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Antonym of -proof suffix

-proof, used as the suffix to a noun, basically means that the object you are describing is resistant to the noun. The specific example that led me to look for this was emailing our support team ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Am I RICEing my injury?

Rest, Icing, Compression and Elevation after an injury, and repeat as needed for the first couple hours. Using RICE, how would I type the answer to the question, "How's your twisted ankle?"? "Not so ...
7
votes
0answers
79 views

Are there any formal infixes? [duplicate]

Infixes appear in words such as 'absolutely' to form 'abso-bloody-lutely', or as 'educate' to 'edu-ma-cate' in the Simpsons. I was wondering if there were any formal infixes. The only ones I could ...
1
vote
1answer
324 views

Why are some “-ist” suffixed words used as the adjective form over the more common “-istic”?

Generally speaking, for any kind of "-ism", the suffix "-ist" produces the noun form and "-istic" produces the adjective form. But there are some "-ist" suffixes that are acceptable or even more ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

suffix question

I noticed that all these words have the same ending: mother, father, brother, other and another. Does anyone know what the suffix -ther means? Or is it a compound suffix: -th &-er? Thank you
3
votes
2answers
60 views

Does the word “findability” exist in English?

There are at least three books with the word findability in their title; all of them to be found on Amazon. According to ODE I own, findability does not exist. Is it a new word? If so, then is it ...
0
votes
1answer
160 views

Which words have a long vowel before the suffix -ic?

In many cases in English, vowels followed by a single consonant are pronounced short (also called lax) when followed by the suffix -ic or -ical, even if they are long in other related words. Some ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

“Economic” vs. “economical”

What is the difference between "economic" and "economical"?
0
votes
0answers
98 views

Using -rich suffix

I have to following example phrase: A movie, rich with effects Now I'd like transform it using the "-rich" suffix: Effect-rich movie At first, does such phrase sound natural? If no, is ...
19
votes
6answers
28k views

Difference between “commentor” and “commentator”

What is the difference between commentor and commentator? Is commentor or commenter a legitimate English word?
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2answers
63 views

Can an adjective be converted into a noun by '-s'?

I saw a passage "this doesn't mean to get riches and honors." 'rich' is an adjective but 'riches' is a plural noun according to the dictionary. Are there any other examples where an adjective becomes ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

What is the difference between “intermediate” and “intermediary” when both mean the same thing? [closed]

I have a tendency to say This case is intermediary This case is an intermediate one This is an intermediate case I probably would stumble over This is an intermediary case ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Wonder's hood end, or is it wonderhood's end?

-hood is the suffix indicating a place or condition, i.e. childhood, neighborhood, etc. At times I have considered the title of the Arthur Clarke novel CHILDHOOD'S END and have wondered if CHILD'S ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

What is the proper suffix to change bildungsroman into an adjective? [closed]

In this case I am wondering what suffix would be the best use for bildungsroman when trying to characterize a memoir.
3
votes
3answers
396 views

What is the proper demonym for someone from Shreveport?

A tweet popped up in my feed recently that posed a really good question. On first blush I thought "Oh, I can answer this!" then upon further reflection I realized I can't. In the case of "New Yorkers"...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

Nouns to adjectives: “-ous” vs. “-ful”

When turning nouns to adjectives, what is the rule for using the suffixes -ous or -ful? Why do pain/harm became painful/harmful and not painous or harmous? Why do glory/nerve become glorious/nervous ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Suffix for 'likely to do'

What brought this up was sabotage, is there a general modifier for a noun (so not necessarily a suffix) to describe someone as about to perform an act of that noun? So if we did it to sabotage, I ...
3
votes
5answers
13k views

Difference between the use of “resilience” and “resiliency”

I constantly hear people use the word "resiliency" (especially sports broadcasters and the like). I've always used "resilience" instead. Is there a preferred word to use in any given situation? As ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

What's the difference between “efficacy” and “effectiveness”?

I usually use the word "effectiveness" in conversation, but sometimes I use the word "efficacy" then self-correct with "effectiveness" . Is there a practical difference between them?
0
votes
2answers
8k views

What is the difference between a “technologist” and a “technician”?

The dictionary offers the following: technologist — a person who specializes in technology technician — specialist in industrial techniques: somebody who is skilled in industrial ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Can “expirable” be a word?

[Code Naming Issue] Please anyone leave me a comment. Anything will be great for me now. I am working on what to name a feature which works as part of a module that generates URLs that expire when ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

The proper usage of 'compeer'; and is it a root word?

Compeer has a definition: A person of equal rank, status or ability What I am asking is what context is this word typically used? And equally important - is it valid to use the words compeering and ...
3
votes
2answers
329 views

Can any noun ending in -ism be swapped for -ist?

Can any noun ending in -ism describing some system or belief be changed for -ist to describe a member of that system? My question might be confusing, so I will run through a few examples: Nihilism =&...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Does the suffix in “lipolysis” and “ketosis” have the same meaning in both the words?

Lipolysis and ketosis both end in ‑sis. Does that suffix have the same meaning in both the words?
2
votes
3answers
153 views

Is 'stewer' a proper English word?

My mother used the word 'stewer' to refer to the pot that you cook stew in, but I have only rarely seen it used this way. Can you tell me what the origin is of this usage?
7
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between the suffixes -ize and -ify

The dictionary ascribes the same purpose to both these suffixes: to denote 'to make, or become'. However, for some neologisms, -ize seems much more appropriate than -ify does, and vice-versa. There ...
3
votes
1answer
109 views

Are there suffixes akin to -phobe and -phile that are less extreme in meaning?

The suffix -phobia means fear of, often irrational fear of. For example, according to Wikipedia: Ophidiophobia or ophiophobia is a particular type of specific phobia, the abnormal fear of ...
7
votes
1answer
524 views

Diminutive forms in English.

In many languages, formation of diminutives by adding suffixes is a productive part of the language. Many languages apply a grammatical diminutive to nouns, a few—including Dutch, Italian and Russian ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

Why did -ful prevail instead of -full for adjectives?

A lot of adjectives in English are based on a noun + the ending -ful. The opposite adjective is usually constructed with the ending -less According to Wiktionary, both endings -ful and -full existed ...
12
votes
5answers
7k views

Usage of -ist and -ian, when to use which?

This is a question bugging me for a long long time, especially for a non-native speaker like myself. We have physicist standing for the people doing physics research, as is linguist, chemist, etc. ...
5
votes
1answer
318 views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
2
votes
1answer
313 views

Is “extrapolability” an existing english word?

I used extrapolability in a Microsoft Word 2010 document and spell checker didn't recognized it. Being a non-native English speaker I wasn’t sure whether it's a real word. Searching for it in Google ...
2
votes
3answers
202 views

Is “recordee” a word? [closed]

Does recordee exist in English? The word doesn't exist in Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries, but I was hoping to use it as "someone who is being recorded".
1
vote
1answer
296 views

Permittee and Permitter? [closed]

According to Wiktionary, permittee is the one who receives a permit. May I call the one who permit something as permitter?