Tagged Questions

A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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1answer
238 views

Antonym of syllogism?

"deduction" is a synonym of "syllogism". "induction" is an antonym of "deduction" I was wondering if there is a antonym of "syllogism" which share the same suffix as "syllogism"?
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1answer
99 views

Is -cund a sufix?

I saw words fecund, jocund, rubicund end with -cund. Is -cund a suffix and what does it mean?
4
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2answers
277 views

Proper placement of suffix while using the first name only

Ordering a gravestone and want to make sure the suffix is used correctly. While the last name is on the bottom to be shared by spouse, I need to put Edward H. II up top. The proper name is Edward ...
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1answer
95 views

The double 'i' is cool, but what's the rule?

At least to a self professed geek its cool to write words like fungii and radii, so naturally in some informal communications I take every opportunity to apply the suffix where it's probably not ...
3
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1answer
306 views

Is *-scule* in *minuscule* a suffix?

Is -scule in minuscule a suffix? What does it mean? scale? (I have looked it up in etymonline and didn't find the answer)
4
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1answer
103 views

Is there a suffix in “masquerade”?

Is there a suffix in masquerade? in masquerade, masque means mask, so is -rade or -ade its suffix? -ade is a suffix in lemonade and blockade, meaning "product". Note: I have searched it in ...
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1answer
254 views

Does “-che” in “douche” and “gauche” have meaning?

"douche" means shower, and "gauche" means awkward, and lacking social experience or grace. Does "-che" in "douche" and "gauche" have meaning?
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3answers
153 views

Travel/Travelers & Journey/Journeyers [closed]

When I change Travel to Travelers, what is that? Is that some sort of participle? Also, how is this accomplished with Exodus? As in 'Exodus-ers'. Does one use the Latin ablative?
4
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1answer
303 views

What is the suffix in indexed math symbols

I've been watching some online courses and I'm having a difficulty understanding what exactly are they saying. The courses are scientific in nature and rather often an indexed symbols appear. The ...
0
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1answer
618 views

What is the meaning and origin of the suffix “-son”? [closed]

A friend recently asked me the meaning of the name Madison. Although I wasn’t sure of the meaning of Madison, it prompted a discussion about the suffix ‑son, seen in a lot of names: Jefferson, ...
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1answer
2k views

Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
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2answers
854 views

What does the -st word ending mean and is it used in any modern vocabulary?

I know there are plenty of words that use the -st ending: wouldst, whilst, unbeknownst, etc. but I'm not really sure what it means to add an -st suffix to a word. What does it mean to add the suffix? ...
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3answers
174 views

Verb for removing from end or beginning [duplicate]

We use "append" and "prepend" for adding to the end and to the beginning respectivly. Is there a word for removing in same place
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2answers
2k views

Usage of -ist and -ian, when to use which?

This is a question bugging me for a long long time, especially for a non-native speaker like myself. We have physicist standing for the people doing physics research, as is linguist, chemist, etc. ...
7
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2answers
445 views

Why did the old pronouns and their respective endings vanish from daily usage?

If I’m not wrong, the verb conjugation in the past used to be: I have we have thou hast ye have he/she/it hath they have This conjugation is closer to its equivalent in the ...
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1answer
227 views

What is the opposite of free intended as “without”?

"Sugar free, taste __" Which word could I use to tell the opposite of "free" intended as "without"?
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2answers
116 views

Is “demonstratee” a legitimate word?

Is demonstratee a legitimate word? None of the usual sources think so, but it seems like -ee should be a productive suffix. If it isn't, is there another word that can be used in reference to the ...
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4answers
20k views

Where do you put the suffix when listing the last name first?

When listing names with the last name first, where should you put the suffix if there is one present? For example, if given the name John Doe Jr., which of the following would be correct? Doe, John ...
0
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0answers
38 views

Is there a rule that dictates the usage of the ending of adjectives as in: symbolical vs. symbolic; economic vs. economical; mythic vs. mythical? [duplicate]

I'm not a native English speaker, but I do have to write in English quite a lot in my work, and I've often come across the use of adjectives that are sometimes added the "al" suffix, as with the ...
3
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2answers
397 views

Eleusian vs. Eleusinian (and, to a lesser extent, Elysian)

Both Eleusian and Eleusinian are used in relation to mysteries. I've only seen Elysian used in relation to Elysian Fields. Given that the suffix -ian denotes "of or belonging to," I'm wondering if ...
4
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1answer
2k views

What are the differences between -ist, -ite, and -ian

The suffixes -ist, -ite, and -ian all mean a follower of a person or idea. For example, a follower of Christianity is a Christian, a follower of Buddhism is a Buddhist, and a follower of Shia Islam is ...
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1answer
6k views

“Exercise” but not “exercize”

Many words are spelled with -ise in British English and -ize in American English: realise/realize sanitise/sanitize scrutinise/scrutinize But exercise can only be spelled with -ise, never with ...
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1answer
129 views

“Boneular” vs. “bonular” [closed]

My knowledge in morphology and orthography is lacking. I would like to know how to spell the neologism boneular, from bone (or Backbone, a programming library used for creating Web applications) and ...
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1answer
2k views

Does the suffix -ion in “invention” mean the same in “station”?

Is the suffix -ion in the word invention the same as in the words direction, nation, fiction, station?
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2answers
1k views

Is it “falsy” or “falsey”?

I have seen both versions of the word, falsy and falsey. It can mean "something that is equivalent to false" in computer science, such as "The only two falsy values in the Ruby Language are false and ...
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0answers
60 views

(n+1)st or (n+1)th? [duplicate]

When referring to object number n+1, is it the (n+1)st or (n+1)th object? Of course, object number 1 would be referred to as the 1st, but since I would say n plus one, adding an -st would make this ...
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2answers
2k views

Why is “k” added to “panic” when suffixes added (as in “panicky”)?

When adding any suffix to the word "panic," a "k" is added after the "c". Examples: panicked, panicking, panicky. Why is this the case? Are there any other English words that do the same? I'm also ...
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4answers
5k views

Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
5
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1answer
549 views

Why does the “e” in judge vanish in the word “judgment”?

The in the word "judgment", the "e" from "judge" is absent. Three questions on this: Why is this? Is there a name for such a contraction? How and why does the "g" still retain its "soft" ...
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3answers
370 views

Coining new words from existing ones: Duplicate last letter?

I am trying to invent a word by taking an existing word and turning it into a noun a person can be called who is interacting with an object. The trouble I ran into was the initial word's ending. ...
3
votes
2answers
602 views

Where does the suffix “-tine” come from?

Where does the suffix -tine come from? For e.g., Ovaltine, Creatine, etc. all have a -tine suffix. What is the meaning connoted to the noun attached?
2
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3answers
675 views

What is the opposite of the ending “-cide” (as in “suicide”, “pesticide”)?

I'm looking for the antonym of -cide (as in suicide, pesticide, etc.). Essentially the ending to words that would mean "to create or embrace".
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3answers
880 views

Has the suffix “-trix” acquired a pejorative meaning in recent years?

A couple days ago I needed the correct word for a female aviator, which I figured was aviatress. A dictionary.com search provided aviatress, aviatrice and aviatrix as acceptable choices. ...
3
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2answers
252 views

What is the proper demonym for someone from Shreveport?

A tweet popped up in my feed recently that posed a really good question. On first blush I thought "Oh, I can answer this!" then upon further reflection I realized I can't. In the case of "New ...
10
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3answers
665 views

“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
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3answers
394 views

'Monthly' and 'annual' as descriptors

When I am describing a service that is billed for once a month I write, "This is a monthly service." When describing a service that is billed for once a year I use, "This is an annual service." ...
4
votes
1answer
754 views

What is the origin of “-ix” as a feminine variation?

Some words are made feminine by altering the suffix to be -ix. Examples: dominator → dominatrix executor → executrix rector → rectrix What is the origin of this variation? From my 5 years of ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Difference between the use of “resilience” and “resiliency”

I constantly hear people use the word "resiliency" (especially sports broadcasters and the like). I've always used "resilience" instead. Is there a preferred word to use in any given situation? As ...
3
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1answer
5k views

Are the adjectives “utopic” and “dystopic” correct English words?

My dictionary only mentions the form ending in "ian" for both adjectives (utopian/dystopian) yet I do come across the "ic" ending in some decent writings. Would that be considered incorrect usage?
2
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1answer
312 views

For the verb 'focus' why is the gerund form 'focusing' with a single S, instead of 'focussing' with a double S? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant The rule that I learned was that when you have a short vowel in the last syllable, you double the last consonant before ...
14
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2answers
421 views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
7
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2answers
322 views

Are there names for consonant-shifts when suffixes are added?

I saw a spelling mistake on an SO question: submittion. That got me wondering, is there a name for the shift of ‑mit‑ to ‑miss‑ in submission, permission, admission and so on? Are there other patterns ...
10
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2answers
402 views

Is “-th” still a productive suffix in English?

The main question here is whether using -(e)th to create ordinals out of cardinals1 is still considered a productive suffix in English. Is it? If so, then does it matter whether we are in a formal ...
2
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2answers
840 views

Difference between “presidentship” and “presidency”

What's the difference between presidentship and presidency? Please give examples to show the difference.
2
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2answers
642 views

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as “-ly” and “-wise” when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary?

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as -ly and -wise when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary? For example: money-wise moneywise Which one is better?
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4answers
665 views

What is the adverbial form of “communicational”?

I tried communicationally, but the Free Dictionary doesn’t find it to be a word. What I am trying to express is that someone is communicationally challenged, basically meaning they can’t communicate ...
2
votes
1answer
555 views

Pronunciation of onomatopoeia, pharmacopoeia, etc

Words such as onomatopoeia and pharmacopoeia incorporate the Greek suffix -poeia, meaning to make or to prepare. Wiktionary's provided etymology for onomatopoeia reads: From Ancient Greek ...
4
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2answers
398 views

When is “-less” used, and when is “-free” used?

When is the suffix "-less" used, and when is the suffix "-free" used? My initial assumption was that "-free" is used when the absence of something is good, such as "care-free", and "-less" is used ...
8
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2answers
771 views

Pedlar vs. peddler

The etymonline entry for peddler reads: late 14c. (c.1300 as a surname, Will. Le Pedelare), from peoddere, peddere (c.1200, mid-12c. as a surname), of unknown origin. It has the appearance of an ...
4
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2answers
2k views

Suffix order: -lessness vs -nessless

What is the correct order for combinations of suffixes -less and -ness? Are they combined in any order, or is there any rule governing a proper usage? hopelessness helplessness But: ...