A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
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What does the -st word ending mean and is it used in any modern vocabulary?

I know there are plenty of words that use the -st ending: wouldst, whilst, unbeknownst, etc. but I'm not really sure what it means to add an -st suffix to a word. What does it mean to add the suffix? ...
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3answers
167 views

Verb for removing from end or beginning [duplicate]

We use "append" and "prepend" for adding to the end and to the beginning respectivly. Is there a word for removing in same place
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Usage of -ist and -ian, when to use which?

This is a question bugging me for a long long time, especially for a non-native speaker like myself. We have physicist standing for the people doing physics research, as is linguist, chemist, etc. ...
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416 views

Why did the old pronouns and their respective endings vanish from daily usage?

If I’m not wrong, the verb conjugation in the past used to be: I have we have thou hast ye have he/she/it hath they have This conjugation is closer to its equivalent in the ...
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189 views

What is the opposite of free intended as “without”?

"Sugar free, taste __" Which word could I use to tell the opposite of "free" intended as "without"?
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110 views

Is “demonstratee” a legitimate word?

Is demonstratee a legitimate word? None of the usual sources think so, but it seems like -ee should be a productive suffix. If it isn't, is there another word that can be used in reference to the ...
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4answers
16k views

Where do you put the suffix when listing the last name first?

When listing names with the last name first, where should you put the suffix if there is one present? For example, if given the name John Doe Jr., which of the following would be correct? Doe, John ...
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38 views

Is there a rule that dictates the usage of the ending of adjectives as in: symbolical vs. symbolic; economic vs. economical; mythic vs. mythical? [duplicate]

I'm not a native English speaker, but I do have to write in English quite a lot in my work, and I've often come across the use of adjectives that are sometimes added the "al" suffix, as with the ...
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377 views

Eleusian vs. Eleusinian (and, to a lesser extent, Elysian)

Both Eleusian and Eleusinian are used in relation to mysteries. I've only seen Elysian used in relation to Elysian Fields. Given that the suffix -ian denotes "of or belonging to," I'm wondering if ...
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What are the differences between -ist, -ite, and -ian

The suffixes -ist, -ite, and -ian all mean a follower of a person or idea. For example, a follower of Christianity is a Christian, a follower of Buddhism is a Buddhist, and a follower of Shia Islam is ...
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“Exercise” but not “exercize”

Many words are spelled with -ise in British English and -ize in American English: realise/realize sanitise/sanitize scrutinise/scrutinize But exercise can only be spelled with -ise, never with ...
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121 views

“Boneular” vs. “bonular” [closed]

My knowledge in morphology and orthography is lacking. I would like to know how to spell the neologism boneular, from bone (or Backbone, a programming library used for creating Web applications) and ...
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Does the suffix -ion in “invention” mean the same in “station”?

Is the suffix -ion in the word invention the same as in the words direction, nation, fiction, station?
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925 views

Is it “falsy” or “falsey”?

I have seen both versions of the word, falsy and falsey. It can mean "something that is equivalent to false" in computer science, such as "The only two falsy values in the Ruby Language are false and ...
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60 views

(n+1)st or (n+1)th? [duplicate]

When referring to object number n+1, is it the (n+1)st or (n+1)th object? Of course, object number 1 would be referred to as the 1st, but since I would say n plus one, adding an -st would make this ...
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Why is “k” added to “panic” when suffixes added (as in “panicky”)?

When adding any suffix to the word "panic," a "k" is added after the "c". Examples: panicked, panicking, panicky. Why is this the case? Are there any other English words that do the same? I'm also ...
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Are the words “sillily”, “uglily”, “friendlily”, “livelily”, etc., valid English?

I have wondered about how to make the words silly, ugly, friendly, lively, etc. into adverbs, so I researched in the Internet. I found many different answers, so I tried checking Oxford Dictionaries. ...
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1answer
453 views

Why does the “e” in judge vanish in the word “judgment”?

The in the word "judgment", the "e" from "judge" is absent. Three questions on this: Why is this? Is there a name for such a contraction? How and why does the "g" still retain its "soft" ...
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347 views

Coining new words from existing ones: Duplicate last letter?

I am trying to invent a word by taking an existing word and turning it into a noun a person can be called who is interacting with an object. The trouble I ran into was the initial word's ending. ...
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2answers
529 views

Where does the suffix “-tine” come from?

Where does the suffix -tine come from? For e.g., Ovaltine, Creatine, etc. all have a -tine suffix. What is the meaning connoted to the noun attached?
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595 views

What is the opposite of the ending “-cide” (as in “suicide”, “pesticide”)?

I'm looking for the antonym of -cide (as in suicide, pesticide, etc.). Essentially the ending to words that would mean "to create or embrace".
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3answers
782 views

Has the suffix “-trix” acquired a pejorative meaning in recent years?

A couple days ago I needed the correct word for a female aviator, which I figured was aviatress. A dictionary.com search provided aviatress, aviatrice and aviatrix as acceptable choices. ...
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235 views

What is the proper demonym for someone from Shreveport?

A tweet popped up in my feed recently that posed a really good question. On first blush I thought "Oh, I can answer this!" then upon further reflection I realized I can't. In the case of "New ...
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“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
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'Monthly' and 'annual' as descriptors

When I am describing a service that is billed for once a month I write, "This is a monthly service." When describing a service that is billed for once a year I use, "This is an annual service." ...
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641 views

What is the origin of “-ix” as a feminine variation?

Some words are made feminine by altering the suffix to be -ix. Examples: dominator → dominatrix executor → executrix rector → rectrix What is the origin of this variation? From my 5 years of ...
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1answer
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Difference between the use of “resilience” and “resiliency”

I constantly hear people use the word "resiliency" (especially sports broadcasters and the like). I've always used "resilience" instead. Is there a preferred word to use in any given situation? As ...
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Are the adjectives “utopic” and “dystopic” correct English words?

My dictionary only mentions the form ending in "ian" for both adjectives (utopian/dystopian) yet I do come across the "ic" ending in some decent writings. Would that be considered incorrect usage?
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1answer
278 views

For the verb 'focus' why is the gerund form 'focusing' with a single S, instead of 'focussing' with a double S? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Focussed” or “focused”? The double consonant The rule that I learned was that when you have a short vowel in the last syllable, you double the last consonant before ...
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399 views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
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Are there names for consonant-shifts when suffixes are added?

I saw a spelling mistake on an SO question: submittion. That got me wondering, is there a name for the shift of ‑mit‑ to ‑miss‑ in submission, permission, admission and so on? Are there other patterns ...
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Is “-th” still a productive suffix in English?

The main question here is whether using -(e)th to create ordinals out of cardinals1 is still considered a productive suffix in English. Is it? If so, then does it matter whether we are in a formal ...
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2answers
714 views

Difference between “presidentship” and “presidency”

What's the difference between presidentship and presidency? Please give examples to show the difference.
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577 views

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as “-ly” and “-wise” when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary?

Should a hyphen be used when constructing words using suffixes such as -ly and -wise when the resulting word isn't in the dictionary? For example: money-wise moneywise Which one is better?
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572 views

What is the adverbial form of “communicational”?

I tried communicationally, but the Free Dictionary doesn’t find it to be a word. What I am trying to express is that someone is communicationally challenged, basically meaning they can’t communicate ...
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1answer
502 views

Pronunciation of onomatopoeia, pharmacopoeia, etc

Words such as onomatopoeia and pharmacopoeia incorporate the Greek suffix -poeia, meaning to make or to prepare. Wiktionary's provided etymology for onomatopoeia reads: From Ancient Greek ...
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363 views

When is “-less” used, and when is “-free” used?

When is the suffix "-less" used, and when is the suffix "-free" used? My initial assumption was that "-free" is used when the absence of something is good, such as "care-free", and "-less" is used ...
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2answers
693 views

Pedlar vs. peddler

The etymonline entry for peddler reads: late 14c. (c.1300 as a surname, Will. Le Pedelare), from peoddere, peddere (c.1200, mid-12c. as a surname), of unknown origin. It has the appearance of an ...
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Suffix order: -lessness vs -nessless

What is the correct order for combinations of suffixes -less and -ness? Are they combined in any order, or is there any rule governing a proper usage? hopelessness helplessness But: ...
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1answer
517 views

The “-igan” ending

Does the -igan suffix serve the same function in the following words? shenanigan cardigan hooligan If so, what does it mean? Where does it come from?
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“Extensible” vs. “extendible”

Where does the adjective form extensible come from and does it connote anything different than extendible? What's the difference, if any, between the two?
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“-ic versus -ical” what's the difference in meaning between adjectives ending in -ic or -ical? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it “geometric” but “theoretical”? “Ironic” vs. “ironical” “Comic” vs. “comical” “Historic” vs. “historical” What's the difference for instance between ...
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2answers
280 views

Is “Songify” a well-received word as an English neology?

I came across the word “songify” for the first time in the article of October 23 NY Times titled ‘Yes We Chant’ with the sub-head, “The Gregory Brothers songify the debate, with Gregorian chanting.” ...
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Difference between “opacity” and “opaqueness”

What is the difference in the meaning und usage of the words opacity and opaqueness?
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378 views

Pronunciation difference between “cycle” and “psycho”

When I speak English, I can't tell the difference between cycle and psycho, I pronounce them the same. And it's not only cycle vs. psycho; when words end in -le or -o, I always confusee them. How to ...
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1answer
332 views

Why does “lactic” have an “-ic”, while “unique” have an “-ique”?

Lactic: "pertaining to milk," 1790 (in lactic acid; so called because it was obtained from sour milk), from Fr. lactique, from L. lactis, gen. of lac "milk" (see lactation) + Fr. -ique. Unique: ...
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235 views

“Utilisability” vs. “usability”

I tried hard to find if we have the noun utilisability in dictionaries but it does not exist. But, when goolging, I found some articles that contain this word. I know that we have the verb to use ...
2
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1answer
178 views

Doctor Jekyll (Ph.D.), I presume

I am writing an analysis paper (not related to title), an need to introduce someone with a doctorate in English. Do I write "Doctor [name]" or do I use suffix?
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8k views

“Postfix” or “suffix”?

Wikipedia and The Free Dictionary were not much help — is there a practical difference in the semantics of suffix and postfix, except that the latter is more rare? File name extensions are well ...