0
votes
3answers
219 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
1
vote
1answer
97 views

“Hierarchical” vs. “hierarchic”

When do you use hierarchical and when hierarchic? For example, hierarchical database sounds much more native to me, even as a non-native English speaker. But why isn't it hierarchic database? Edit: ...
10
votes
3answers
542 views

“You are likely to [verb]” vs. “you are like to [verb]”

In a recent answer to another question, a fellow poster just used the following turn of phrase: The nearest you’re like to get is [word][.] I only ever saw and used "you’re likely to..." myself, ...
4
votes
2answers
345 views

When is “-less” used, and when is “-free” used?

When is the suffix "-less" used, and when is the suffix "-free" used? My initial assumption was that "-free" is used when the absence of something is good, such as "care-free", and "-less" is used ...
7
votes
3answers
826 views

“Golden crown” vs. “gold crown”

In case of the need to describe the color of a crown which is shown as part of an image, which is correct: a golden crown, or a gold crown? Is it important if it is made of gold or not, but the color ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“Unequivocably” vs. “unequivocally”

I was interested in the following sentence which appeared in a news article titled “SCIENCE WATCH; PROGRESS IN AIDS DISPUTE” in The New York Times (March 10, 1987). Dr. Robert Gallo at the cancer ...
0
votes
2answers
63 views

“Memberify” or “membrify”? [closed]

Which is the correct form when adding the -ify suffix to member? memberify membrify I know it's not a regular word, I want to use it in a context for something like "make me a member".
3
votes
4answers
800 views

Adjective or noun when referring to plural citizenship

What is the right form to use when talking about plural citizenship? "We are Italian" or "we are Italians"? (or American, Or German or any other ending with "*an") Same issue for "Saudi" or "Saudies", ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

“Old days” or “olden days”?

Sometimes I use the phrase "back in the old days". I was recently in a class where the trainer kept using the phrase "olden days." Which usage is acceptable?
31
votes
9answers
16k views

“Trainer” is to “trainee” as “mentor” is to what?

What do you call someone who is being mentored? Is it mentoree or mentee? Does the term student or pupil imply a context outside the business environment?
6
votes
4answers
2k views

“Consistence” and “consistency”

What is the relation and difference between the nouns consistence and consistency? For example, which one should be used in the following sentence? Although he has passed the exam, he is ...
8
votes
4answers
38k views

“Ironic” vs. “ironical”

Being that this highly related question primarily asked whether ironical is actually a word (and if it is used regionally), I'm interested to know whether there is a difference between it and ironic ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“Scientific” versus “scientifical”

Is there any substantive difference in the meanings of these two words? Is the latter considered a proper word at all? If the answer to either of the above questions is yes, what are these words' ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

What are the limits of using the suffix “-esque”?

I'm seeing this suffix everywhere lately. Of course, there are a number of -esques that are commonly used (i.e. Kafkaesque), but is there some sort of rule for determining who (or what) gets assigned ...
13
votes
6answers
15k views

Difference between “commentor” and “commentator”

What is the difference between commentor and commentator? Is commentor or commenter a legitimate English word?