A suffix is an element of a language that is added to the end of a word. E.g. -ly is a suffix often found at the end of adverbs: really, quickly, happily, strangely, etc., -d/-ed is a suffix often found at the end of a verb to denote the simple past: used, bruised, grazed, heated, etc.

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7
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2answers
130 views

Are some grammar rules different for Latin origin nouns with the ‑ion suffix?

Two questions on ELL.SE, one involving the word division and the other about the word implementation, made me realize that I treat these words differently without really understanding the grammatical ...
1
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1answer
33 views

Best way to practice Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes [closed]

I am preparing for SAT. As part of my preparation I recently started word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. The link I'm learning from just gives a list. I'm not confident even after memorizing that. Is ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

How do you describe someone who is into incest?

pedophile - one who is into pre-pubescent children _____phile - one who is into incest? Is there a single word that fits into "He's a ______" to describe someone who is into incest? A hyphenated ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

What is origin of suffix '-stan', as in Hindustan, Afghanistan? [closed]

As a supplementary, is -stan related to 'sthan' (Sanskrit)?
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Whats the difference between “-ist” and “-er”

The suffixes -ist, and -er are added to a base word to name a person who does an action: pitch, pitcher. Some more examples: carpenter artist painter nationalist banker dentist ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

-gate, and gamergate

I have always understood the phrase ____-gate to refer to a controversy or conflict. For example, deflate-gate was the hubbub around whether the Patriots intentionally deflated balls during the AFC ...
20
votes
12answers
6k views

What word means a “male temptress”?

I was trying to describe a man who entices others into making bad decisions. I have several closely related questions: Is it okay in English to refer to a man as a temptress? Is there a uniquely ...
0
votes
2answers
75 views

What is the tense used in a phrase such as “He is trapped”?

I've read that the -ed suffix usually indicates a "past participle" (as in "I was trapped"), but: I'm not sure what part-of-speech "trapped" functions as in the phrase. Indicating present state ...
12
votes
2answers
595 views

Abolition vs. Abolishment

At times I have caught myself writing the noun form of abolish as "abolishment" and then pausing before realizing it should really be "abolition". Even as I type my spellchecker tells me that ...
13
votes
1answer
617 views

How is “erogenous” incorrectly formed?

When I check the etymology of erogenous in OED, it is mentioned that it is incorrectly formed (along with erogenic). Etymology of erogenous from OED: formed as erogenic adj. + -ous suffix. ...
1
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1answer
60 views

Difference between the suffixes “-titude” and “-titute”

I vaguely remember the suffix "-titude" is related to a state of a particular action, such as "certitude", which means a state of being sure. But I don't know what this kind of suffix actually is ...
5
votes
1answer
126 views

What is the opposite of -genic?

English uses the suffix -genic to mean "generating / generated by / producing": anxiogenic (anxiety-producing) iatrogenic (caused by the healer / doctor) neurogenic (produced by the nervous system) ...
2
votes
1answer
185 views

Is the following sentence odd? “I find them comic”

But this is the Old Bailey. He's a Lord — or she's a Lady. You may find the wigs and the ceremonial ways that people refer to each other strange or intimidating. I was advised. But I don't find ...
3
votes
2answers
107 views

Can any noun ending in -ism be swapped for -ist?

Can any noun ending in -ism describing some system or belief be changed for -ist to describe a member of that system? My question might be confusing, so I will run through a few examples: Nihilism ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Why are some “-ist” suffixed words used as the adjective form over the more common “-istic”?

Generally speaking, for any kind of "-ism", the suffix "-ist" produces the noun form and "-istic" produces the adjective form. But there are some "-ist" suffixes that are acceptable or even more ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Are products of wordsmithing proper english?

Several languages in which English has its roots have easily definable rules. For example, sticking "A" in from of an adjective can mean the opposite of that adjective (Asymmetrical, symmetrical), ...
8
votes
3answers
283 views

Is there a general rule for which types of nouns end in -archy vs. -cracy?

Why do we use democracy vs. demarchy and anarchy vs. anocracy?
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Suffixes -hood -dom -ness… Is there any rule?

First of all this is my first question on this board, and I was not sure to ask it here or on English Language Learners. English is not my mother tongue, hence I wonder if there was any rule to ...
1
vote
3answers
83 views

What's the best, most concise word for the abbreviations put after one's name to denote the achievement of degrees?

Such as M.d., RN, LSW.... I'm looking for the word that fills the blank in following sentence: It is as if living with her for as long as he did merits the addition of a ________ to his ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Omit -> Omission

Why does omit turn to omission and not omition? Examples of more words acting the same are welcome (I found Submit) P.S. Is Omission the same as Omitting? (Trying to compare with fit -> fitting)
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Fruitful? Fruitless? Fruitempty? Fruitmore? [closed]

I notice that the word fruitful's opposite is fruitless. It's kind of bizarre. Figuratively speaking, if the activity produces no fruit, it is fruit-less. But if it does produce fruit, shouldn't it ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the history and meaning of the suffix “-ism”?

I have always understood that an "-ism" suffix on something implies that the word being applied to is a belief or doctrinal worldview or otherwise a philosophy. This blogpost sums up that ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Disoriented vs. Disorientated [duplicate]

In the U.S., we seemingly prefer the former to the latter. However, I was sitting with my friends when one of them stated that he was "disorientated" while we were playing a video game. My theory, at ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Morphological analysis of 'unlawfulness'

How would you give the internal structure of the word 'unlawfulness'? My attempt: un - law - ful - ness prefix - noun - suffix - suffix Internal structure: law + ful > Adjective un + law + ful > ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

The origins of surname suffixes [closed]

When did mankind begin using surname suffixes such as Jr. Sr. I II III?
0
votes
2answers
82 views

Dynamicality from Dynamic?

I am using the word 'dynamic' as the following definition from the Merriam Webster's Dictionary. 3. of random-access memory : requiring periodic refreshment of charge in order to retain data The ...
2
votes
2answers
899 views

Any word followed by “proof” means that something is protected against that word

I was wondering if you combine any word and add "proof" at the and, does that automatically means that it is protected against the first word? For example: Bulletproof - means something that can't ...
1
vote
1answer
182 views

Curious about “en-” and “-en” in the same word…

There’s a motorcycle part called the “enrichener.” To my ears, it sounds like the “en-” prefix and “-en” suffix (in the enrichen part of enrichener) are redundant. Of course, there is also ...
4
votes
3answers
251 views

Terminology for a word containing a prefix/suffix or neither

Does terminology exist for discriminating between words which do/don't contain a prefix/suffix? How could I describe this difference in the synonyms 'discontinue' and 'stop'? Here, 'dis' is a prefix ...
0
votes
3answers
199 views

Why “producing”, not “produccing”? [closed]

Same with "bleeding" and "bleedding". We say "swimming", so why not "bleedding"?
0
votes
3answers
149 views

Is there an -ically suffixed word to describe a duration?

We know about chronologically to describe order by time, but is there a word to describe duration? I want to say something like "school is x-ically taxing", as in, school is heavily taxing on an ...
0
votes
1answer
215 views

Is a stem word required with a prefix and suffix combination?

Suppose the following lexeme: mononess Consisting of the prefix "mono-" (meaning "one") and suffix "-ness" (meaning "the quality of"), but no stem/root word. Could this lexeme be a valid word ...
0
votes
2answers
387 views

When are Roman Numeral suffixes appropriate for number abbreviations?

This question was asked and closed last year as general reference. However, it did not attract the caliber of answer I expected it to. I suggested the following content as an edit, but it was rejected ...
1
vote
1answer
645 views

Adding a suffix and a prefix to the word “ocean” [closed]

Is it possible to add a prefix to the word ocean? Also, is it possible to add a suffix to it as well?
0
votes
2answers
63 views

How to write word “hashtagged” using “#” symbol? #ed, #'ed, #-ed?

It looks like #ed would be correct way to write word "hashtagged", but this can be confused with hashtag – #ed. What would be another acceptable way to write word "hashtagged" using # symbol?
2
votes
2answers
362 views

Why does -istic turn some words negative?

The definition of -istic is: Used to form adjectives from nouns, especially nouns in -ist and -ism, with the meaning "of or pertaining to" said nouns. I don't see anything in there that could ...
4
votes
1answer
698 views

What is the difference between the suffixes -ize and -ify

The dictionary ascribes the same purpose to both these suffixes: to denote 'to make, or become'. However, for some neologisms, -ize seems much more appropriate than -ify does, and vice-versa. There ...
-2
votes
1answer
73 views

What is the antonym of prospection in the context of seeking reward? [closed]

Currently looking into the effects of neuroscience on decision making. There is the limbic system which is in charge of the seeking of positive reward i.e. prospection. In contrast to this there is ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Why do some words with Latin etymology use -ae suffix while others use the -s? [duplicate]

Why do some words in English with Latin etymology use the suffix -ae while others use the more common -s?
2
votes
2answers
614 views

What's a suffix that means to find something cute or adorable?

"Xenophobia" is being fearful of outsiders, and "xenophilia" would be to love outsiders. To fit in with these words, I'm looking for a suffix to attach to the "xeno~" prefix to in order to create a ...
2
votes
1answer
353 views

difference between suffixes '-ish' and '-y'

Recently Prince Charles used the word 'Hitlery,' in the sense of "possessing some properties of Hitler." Is there any difference between the suffixes -ish and -y ?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Geometric or Geometrical?

I have read the excellent answers to Why is it "geometric" but "theoretical" - my question is specifically about usage. Is there a best practice for deciding between the variants "geometric" and ...
-2
votes
1answer
182 views

Signature for Doctor of Information Technology prefix and suffix [closed]

How can I sign my name with the degree of "Doctor of Information Technology" Is this all correct Dr.Full Name Full Name D.I.T Dr Full Name (Doctor of Information Technology) Dr.Last Name Can I ...
2
votes
2answers
805 views

Origin of the noun-forming suffix “-hood”

How did -hood evolve into the noun-forming suffix commonly used in words such as childhood, priesthood, or neighborhood— and including certain pseudonyms such as robinhood which could easily be ...
4
votes
1answer
280 views

Paramount, tantamount and …?

Paramount: more important than anything else; supreme. Tantamount: equivalent in seriousness to; virtually the same as. ??mount: less important than anything else What is the word ...
3
votes
4answers
444 views

Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates?

Do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates? By 'ordinal suffix' I mean '-th', '-nd', '-rd', e.g. 'April 17' instead of 'April 17th'. If they do, is there an explanation for this behavior?
19
votes
9answers
3k views

Opposite of the suffix -less

I'm looking for a suffix that has the opposite meaning of the suffix -less as in stainless. That is, a suffix that means “not free of ...”. In German, for example, there is the adverb “behaftet” and ...
2
votes
1answer
922 views

Usage of the noun suffix “-ment”

What is a good rule for the usage of the noun suffix -ment? Is desirement as acceptable as achievement?
-2
votes
1answer
110 views

“Oriented” vs. “orientated” [duplicate]

I couldn't help but add an additional frame of reference. Though I personally find the utterance of "orientated" to be a failed attempt at the proper word "oriented", the collective commentary is ...
6
votes
3answers
212 views

Do other suffixes exist for locative and directional 'adverbs'? eg here hither hence

Years ago from JRR Tolkien's The Silmarillion, I learned the delightful suffixes -ence and -ither in the word meanings: hence: from this nearby place hither: toward this nearby place thence: from ...