Questions about determining the subject of a sentence or clause

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15
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is there omission of subject in sentences like “Thought you'd never ask.”

Another example is "Hope this helps." "Thought you'd never ask." is the omission of "I thought you'd never ask." "Hope this helps." is the omission of "I hope this helps." In English grammar, ...
0
votes
3answers
616 views

Omission of agent in active voice

I love writing but grammar is seriously not my cup of tea so please forgive my ignorance. The case in point is: Henry’s eyes were gouged out by George. Is it possible to write this in active ...
2
votes
2answers
267 views

Term used for the number of items in a singular or plural noun or sentence

Can anyone confirm the name of the term used for the number of items in the terms singular, plural, etc.? Does singular or plural indicate the cardinality of a part of the sentence, or is there ...
0
votes
1answer
268 views

What are verbs specific to living subjects called?

The set of verbs applicable to living organisms can also apply to other inanimate subjects like rain forests (e.g. resembled, looked) but I'd like to identify those verbs which are strictly applicable ...
9
votes
5answers
47k views

“I and someone”, “me and someone” or “I and someone we” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “I” instead of “me?” A friend of mine asked me for advice about an e-mail he was writing. There was a sentence like this: I and ...
3
votes
5answers
4k views

Is it acceptable to begin a declarative sentence with “Am”?

I want to know firstly if it's grammatically correct to start a declarative sentence with "Am". For example: Am excited about the game today. Secondly, if it is grammatically incorrect, then I ...
3
votes
1answer
286 views

Is “ … and was wondering …” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I <verb> and am <rest of sentence> Since I'm a native Spanish speaker I tend to suppress the subject a lot when speaking, since most of the time it's tacit ...
8
votes
3answers
48k views

What is the difference between nominative and accusative case? [closed]

Also in Linguistics what is a subject?
2
votes
2answers
570 views

Meaning based on emphasis

Is there a term used to explain how some words change meaning based on the accent? For example, "convict" can be both a noun and a verb depending on which syllable is emphasized. The same is true for ...
2
votes
1answer
527 views

What is the proper (practical/efficient) way to analyze a sentence?

One is given the sample sentence: The fat blind man ran from the dog. What are the procedural steps to deduce the subject and predicate from the sentence? What are the general steps to ...
3
votes
3answers
540 views

“Who” vs. “whom” in tricky sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the rule for using "who" or "whom"? Which is correct? A certificate is a statement that states who is entitled. A certificate is ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Figuring the SVO of the sentence “I'm Tom.”

I was under the impression that every sentence has a subject–verb–object (SVO) where S and V are compulsory and O is optional. So basically I was wondering in the sentence "I'm Tom." is the subject ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“There always come/comes a point”

Which is correct? There always come a point... There always comes a point... Would there be better ways to write this?
-2
votes
3answers
3k views

Don't forget [who/whom] you're dealing with [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What's the rule for using "who" or "whom"? "Don't forget [who/whom] you're dealing with." I know the rules for who vs. whom, but I'm having ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

“A guy whose job is to” vs “a guy whose job it is to”?

I've been hearing the phrase "whose job it is to" quite often lately. Consider these two sentences: We have a guy whose job is to clean windows. We have a guy whose job it is to clean ...
3
votes
2answers
855 views

Subject with multiple verbs

I wrote this sentence: In both cases, execution is asynchronous, and results in the execution of the command or event handler on the program’s one thread at the next opportunity. I was told that ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

Where did the person change?

"She realizes there is nothing to fear, not world travel alone to remote places, nor her own disease - and that letting go of identity is the only hurdle to leap before doing what you want." I ...
10
votes
3answers
11k views

“Are” vs. “is” with compound subjects

How are the wife and kid? How is the wife and kid? Which is more correct?
19
votes
6answers
6k views

Did English ever have a “you” plural?

Outside of the dialectical form used in the Southern US, "y'all," has English ever had a plural "you"? If not, how does English get around using this form?
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Are you comfortable with who(m) he is?

Are you comfortable with him? (correct) Are you comfortable with whom he is? (??) You're comfortable with whom he is. (??) Are you comfortable with who he is? (??) You're comfortable ...
1
vote
2answers
598 views

Should I use “who” or “whom” as the only word in a sentence?

I understand that "who" is for the subject and "whom" is for the object. However, sometimes they are used as the only word in a sentence. For example: Person 1: Yeah, he ate the entire cake. ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the grammatical difference behind “is interesting” and “is interested”?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...
3
votes
2answers
258 views

Pluralization: backward and backwards in context

Unless I'm using "backward" and "backwards" wrong, I can pluralize it when the subject is not plural and vice versa. For example, correct me if I'm wrong: One movie. If you watch your ...
6
votes
3answers
9k views

“like I” or “like me”?

In high school we learned to say "than I" and "as I" because you could potentially add an "am" to the end of the sentence. Examples: "She is smarter than I." (Think: "...than I am.") "He is as tall ...
0
votes
2answers
75 views

What are the subjects of these questions? [closed]

1.Do you think I did well in my Spanish examination? 2.Who won the music festival?
9
votes
1answer
1k views

How do I determine subject and subject complement in “A side-effect is the spread of commercialese to other domains.”?

Consider this example: Commercialese is an instrument of art, designed to enrich and invigorate our language—surely you will all agree with this—, and we should encourage newcomers to learn ...
3
votes
3answers
636 views

“Me” versus “I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
2
votes
2answers
470 views

why differences in Object vs Subject

We have different pronouns to express objects vs subjects: he vs him who vs whom etc. What's the point? What extra information is communicated by expressing object vs subject? Shouldn't it be ...
14
votes
1answer
18k views

Which is correct: “you and I” or “you and me”?

I was told the correct usage is for example: "My wife and me" but I hear often "I and my wife" or "my wife and I". Google gives 34M results for "My wife and I" and 909K results for "My wife and me" ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the best way to find the subject in a sentence?

What's the best way to find the subject in a sentence? How do you define a subject? I am especially curious about such cases, in which the subject seems to be represented by more than one word: The ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

“You” or “your” when using two subjects with a possession?

I came across your and Mr X's publication or I came across you and Mr X's publication
11
votes
7answers
14k views

Which is correct: “If it were I” or “If it were me”?

I'm fairly sure it's the former, but it sounds even more stilted than the usual cases in which "I" is less common, but more correct.
7
votes
3answers
1k views

What is a better way to write: only three people signed up: you, me and “thehulk66”

It is better to write this: Only three people signed up: you, Jim, and I. than this: Only three people signed up: you, me, and Jim. Because "I" is a subject and not an object. But ...