3
votes
3answers
406 views

What's the subject of “There is my biscuit!” ? And how about “There is one biscuit left”?

What's the subject, grammatically speaking, of these sentences? There is my biscuit! My biscuit is there! There is one biscuit left. I don't really know how to analyze these. The following ...
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

words used for pseudo-subject [duplicate]

Based on what I have understood from the answers given, the word 'there' is what is called 'pseudo-subject' if it introduces a sentence. I want to know whether there are other words that can act as ...
5
votes
3answers
433 views

Confusing rule about subject-verb agreement

I am currently working through "The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation" by Jane Straus. In the section on subject-verb agreement the author describes a rule for sentences that begin with "there" or ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Which is the proper response to “I love you”? [closed]

When my wife says I love you, my natural response is you too, meaning “[I love] you too.” I realise that I’m in the minority here. I more frequently hear me too, but I don’t feel comfortable with ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Can a clause have more than one (in)direct object?

I am fairly convinced that any English clause (and it probably also counts for other languages, but I can't be sure about that) can only contain 1 subject, 1 direct object, and 1 indirect object. This ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

the same A as Verb + Subject [duplicate]

While reading a book, I found: Objective-C supports the same conventions as does C. I've thought "... as C does" is correct. For example, As time goes by, we come to forget almost ...
2
votes
4answers
702 views

A does the same B as does C

While reading a book, I found: Objective-C supports the same conventions for specifying strings as does C. I've thought "... as C does" is correct. For example, As time goes, we come to ...
1
vote
1answer
390 views

participial phrase at the beginning of a sentence must refer to the grammatical subject

I am reading this The Elements of Style book by Strunk and White, I am confused about rule number 11. A participial phrase at the beginning of a sentence must refer to the grammatical subject There ...
1
vote
2answers
318 views

What is the noun to describe whether a word is subject or object?

Just as "number" describes whether a noun is singular or plural, is there a noun that describes whether a pronoun is subject or object? For example: The number of the first-person pronoun "I" is ...
1
vote
1answer
240 views

What is the correct name for this particular unclear-subject error?

An example: the sentence "Upon finishing these books, I think the reader has a new perspective on history." Taken literally, it could mean that "I, upon finishing these books, think..." Or it ...
-2
votes
2answers
667 views

Usage of the perfect gerund [closed]

Is there any grammatical error in this sentence: Having been up all night makes me tired Can I use having been/done... as subject?
0
votes
2answers
446 views

“Either A or B”: what exactly is the subject? [closed]

My brother had this pair of questions on a Year 7 English exam. Consider this sentence: "Either Michael or Susan will have to do night shift tonight." Which is the subject? ...
1
vote
3answers
379 views

Subject and Object in Commands?

I'm having difficulty figuring out the subject and object in the following sentence: Give me that pencil. The confusion is since someone is requesting the pencil, should they be the subject? In ...
0
votes
3answers
374 views

Does a student own, hold, possess, or something else a transcript? [closed]

Does a student hold, own, possess, or something else a transcript? My wife just asked me a question for which I do not have an answer. She asked me, "holder or owner of a transcript?" I wasn't sure ...
2
votes
2answers
109 views

On the structure of “search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out”

I came across the following expression: The primary task of many American troops in Baghdad has been to search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out. This is from a ...
1
vote
2answers
560 views

“A lot of people, especially this one psychoanalyst […], keeps asking”

In the last chapter of The Catcher in The Rye: A lot of people, especially this one psychoanalyst guy they have here, keeps asking me if I'm going apply myself when I go back to school next ...
2
votes
1answer
486 views

What is the proper (practical/efficient) way to analyze a sentence?

One is given the sample sentence: The fat blind man ran from the dog. What are the procedural steps to deduce the subject and predicate from the sentence? What are the general steps to ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the grammatical difference behind “is interesting” and “is interested”?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

How do I determine subject and subject complement in “A side-effect is the spread of commercialese to other domains.”?

Consider this example: Commercialese is an instrument of art, designed to enrich and invigorate our language—surely you will all agree with this—, and we should encourage newcomers to learn ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What's the best way to find the subject in a sentence?

What's the best way to find the subject in a sentence? How do you define a subject? I am especially curious about such cases, in which the subject seems to be represented by more than one word: The ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

“You” or “your” when using two subjects with a possession?

I came across your and Mr X's publication or I came across you and Mr X's publication
11
votes
7answers
14k views

Which is correct: “If it were I” or “If it were me”?

I'm fairly sure it's the former, but it sounds even more stilted than the usual cases in which "I" is less common, but more correct.