Questions about determining the subject of a sentence or clause

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Is there a term that describes leaving out the implied subject of a question? [duplicate]

For example, "Not going? Be sure to cancel at least 24 hours in advance." has an implied "Are you…" in front. Is there a term for this concept? Is it proper grammar (or at least accepted in business ...
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0answers
95 views

For an infinitive functioning as an object, is it necessary that its logical subject should be identical with the subject of the sentence?

Some grammarians claims: when an infinitive functions as an object, its logical subject must be identical with the subject of the sentence. (seen in a book on grammatical analysis) Is it obligatory? ...
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0answers
23 views

Are that-clauses like these valid?

I told Marie that he was leaving was sad. I knew that she was leaving was desired. I think in these examples the there are actually two that-clauses nested: one as the subject of the other one (...
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22 views

Identifying the subject in passive voice

What is the subject in: "In the City's Square mile are squeezed 400,000 workers" Would love to get detalied explanation. Many Thanks!
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0answers
26 views

Can I omit the pronoun when it appears more than once in the same phrase?

When the "I" appear more than once, can I omit the second "I"? original: "I am your friend and I am seeking for help." omitted: "I'm your friend and am seeking for help."
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27 views

Tricky Subject Verb Agreement Examples [duplicate]

One of the people has or One of the people have gone? I would use 'One of the people has gone', but I am not really sure if it's redundant to use that these days. Please help.
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27 views

Subject/object of sentence

Am I right in thinking this sentence in today's Irish Times is wrong: "A long-serving employee dismissed by Dunnes Stores after it won an appeal against an award of €67,500 damages to her has been ...
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1answer
38 views

Doing A is preferable to doing B. = Doing A rather than doing (?) / do (?) B is advisable

In that situation I would rather do A than (I would) (do) B. If the verb 'do' appears after 'rather' it has to be in the bare infinitive, not in the gerund. How about that other way of expressing ...
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27 views

Prepositions as subjects

I have some questions on the role of the subject in sentences. 1- When (in what sentences) a preposition can act as a subject (that is there is some object in that sentence which is the object of that ...
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0answers
38 views

Singular or plural verb following “any” with a plural noun [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "If any of the parties are required,...."? Is it correct to say, "If any of the parties is required,...."?
0
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1answer
82 views

Asking subject - object questions. 'Did' or past form of the verb in Past Simple?

The question is about the rule of asking questions in Past Simple tense. Please, look at the questions below and tell me if my thinking and naming of questions stated here are correct? For example ...
4
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1answer
36 views

Subject or subject complement

In the sentence "What is it that makes us happy?", is 'what' the subject or the subject complement? Does 'that' refer back to 'it' or to 'What'?
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1answer
173 views

there + semantic verb

What semantic verbs are used with there besides the verb to be? I'm looking for the cases when there is used as a formal subject. For example in: There came a knock There comes a point in life
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1answer
56 views

Identifying the subject of a complicated sentence

This sentence took me a lot of time to parse: For migrant birds, which habitats are suitable during the non-breeding season influences habitat availability, population resilience to habitat ...
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4answers
187 views

Quick subject question [duplicate]

Sorry for the dumb question, but can someone please explain the subject and verb in this sentence? "There is a house in new orleans whose veranda is lined with satin"
3
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3answers
127 views

“Me knowing that he was… ” Is “me” the subject?

"That was it," he told me. "Laughing at me behind their faces, about a woman. Me knowing that he was up there, and them knowing I knew that if I busted in and dragged him out and bashed his head ...
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1answer
59 views

“He who” as an indirect object [duplicate]

Is the following incorrect? Return it to he who gave it to you. Presuming it is, how would I correct it? (without resorting to saying "to the person who gave it to you," which is somewhat ...
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0answers
41 views

Were or are with compound subject?

Someome asked me which of these sentences is correct: There are no pus or polyps. Or There were no pus or polyps. Honestly, both sound wrong to me. I'd say, "there was neither pus nor polys." I ...
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0answers
97 views

we + noun vs us + noun

The phrase "us newly retired were taught" appeared in a letter to The (London) Times recently. A subsequent letter suggested this was an error (due to the writer having 'certainly allowed “progressive”...
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1answer
89 views

Plural or singular- is either correct?

We are losing our abilty/abilities to write. Abilities is 100% a word. True, it can be viewed as a shared thing in that we all have the one ability. But I think you could also say that it can be ...
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1answer
35 views

In the statement “this word” is the statement referring to “this”, or “word”? [closed]

In the two-word statement "this word", would the word in question be "this", or "word", and why or why not?
2
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1answer
151 views

Subject Verb Possessive Gerund problem: “He had me do this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this sounds awkward, but in sentences such as "He said me being here was wonderful," it's obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here." It should be "my being" because we need to ...
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2answers
248 views

Which one is correct - “ There is only us here” or “There are only us here” [duplicate]

Temporary reopen note: The linked-to question is about the verb agreeing with the grammatical number of the first item in a list in a there is/are sentence. However there is no list in this question ...
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1answer
37 views

how do I vs. how do you [closed]

I was wondering which one is used more often by Americans when asking something? How do you get the the train station? vs How do I get to the train station? I think British use 'one', which I ...
0
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2answers
70 views

comma between subject and verb

'Apples, oranges, kiwis, etc., are possible fruits to eat in this country.' 'Apples, oranges, kiwis, etc., all are possible fruits to eat in this country.' 'Apples, oranges, kiwis, etc. are possible ...
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1answer
503 views

“I hope you enjoyed the holidays and are having a great new year.” Grammar Issues? [closed]

"I hope you enjoyed the holidays and are having a great new year." Is this grammatically correct? Firstly, there is a tense change. Possibly other problems. Obviously this is correct: "I hope you ...
1
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1answer
51 views

“One of the sources of water in our country ARE the rivers” [duplicate]

"One of the sources of water in our country are the rivers" in this sentence, wasn't it supposed to be 'is' instead of 'are'? Normally we say "One of my friends is responsible for this," don't we?
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3answers
42 views

Should a different word be used when “what” is used as an object?

While speaking with a co-worker today, I asked "Who should I speak with?" I quickly corrected myself saying "With whom should I speak?" I followed with "What should I look at?" To ...
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1answer
35 views

Can “another” be used as a subject? [closed]

For example, there are two groups of people, a group travels to a foreign country just to enjoy beautiful attractions or take part in interesting festivals, and another goes to a new place to ...
7
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3answers
169 views

Verb-Subject Order

Is it optional to front the verb in sentences like the one below when an adverbial precedes? In the film, appear two more girls who think that Dallas is quite rude. I have already checked the ...
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1answer
85 views

“I am only me” vs. “I am only I”

Is it more correct to say "I am only me" or "I am only I?" I know that the subject should follow a linking verb like "am" or "is", e.g.: "It is I", but "It is me" is also correct by common educated ...
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2answers
67 views

“The superhero is you” vs. “The superhero are you”

I know there was already a similar question asked before, but I don't get it completely. So, as I take it, you can exchange "The superhero is you" with "The superhero are you" without a big change in ...
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2answers
130 views

Should subject come first in sentence?

I don't know the exact terms used to describe this situation but I'm wondering whether there is a clearly "correct" way of phrasing this sentence. I know both versions are grammatically correct, but ...
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3answers
342 views

Can a pronoun functioning as Object also be a Subject?

I want him to call me tomorrow. In this sentence we see: I, subject; want, verb; him, object. What is the subject of to call? Him? But him is the object of the verb want. Is this a correct ...
3
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1answer
85 views

Why does it matter what the subject is?

I see a lot of questions asking "what is the subject"? (This, for example.) Why does it matter, practically, what the subject is? How does knowing the subject give more information than just knowing ...
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6answers
676 views

What's the Subject in: 'And up here in the corner is me'

If two people are looking at a photo, and one of them pointing out the different people says: And up here in the corner is me. ... what is the Subject of the sentence? The phrase up here in ...
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2answers
108 views

Is it grammatically correct - “Her and her looney boyfriend nicked my truck of cigarettes and drove it in the river.”

Is it grammatically correct - "Her and her looney boyfriend nicked my truck of cigarettes and drove it into the river. Just for a laugh." Is that first word 'Her' as a subject grammatically correct? ...
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1answer
42 views

Does “is” always distinguish a subject and predicate ?

"Martin thinks he is a cat" Martin is the subject and thinking he is the cat is the predicate, right ? Is there ever such a thing as a sentence with "is" more than once, but only one subject and ...
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2answers
69 views

Do I lose the subject of the sentence by adding a preposition?

The following second sentence, continues the first, but I wonder whether using the word in causes the second sentence to no longer have a subject, or does it remain from the prior sentence by way of ...
4
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2answers
135 views

Why are grammatical subjects called subjects?

In a monarchical state a subject is "one that is placed under authority or control" (Merriam). If A is subject to B, A is figuratively beneath B. This meaning makes sense with the word's roots of ...
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0answers
17 views

sentence omits subject [duplicate]

How is this grammar works? In resume: I lead a group of three developers and ... → Led group of three developers and ... Is this a past participle or Ellipsis (it just omits subject)? Is it just ...
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2answers
45 views

we come across so many noteworthy thoughts *to point out*. What's wrong with this sentence?

I have a feeling that something is wrong with this sentence but don't know it's grammatical reason. Can you help me with it? In reviewing Sylvia Plath`s short poem Mirror, we come across so many ...
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2answers
70 views

Syntax - Giving proof something is a subject

So I'm trying to figure out how to provide proof that something is a subject of a sentence. I know to prove something is a noun, you can put determiners in front of it, and pluralize it (if it's a ...
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3answers
153 views

Subject predicate inversion due to negation

I was reading about subject predicate inversion inverted word-order... is also used in clauses introduced by a negative or restrictive clause element. In the following example, the initial ...
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2answers
72 views

Grammatically, what is “It” in the following sentence?

I'm currently working at a private academy in Korea, and my boss just asked me a real head-scratcher. In the sentence: It doesn't have to be hot and humid for players to lose too much water from ...
3
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2answers
59 views

Omission of subject

Is it correct to omit the subject of a subordinate clause if it coincides with the subject of the main clause, for example, I felt drowsy when (I) woke up? Can you give me a reference to the ...
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1answer
105 views

Subject pronoun or object pronoun?

Here is a sentence: Everyone likes you but her/she. What should be the correct pronoun? According to me since we are replacing a subject with a pronoun it should be she, but the answer according ...
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2answers
44 views

Subject Omission

I have a complicated question to ask you. I wrote a composition and there was a sentence like this: [...] then he saw the brother he thought was dead But then my teacher corrected me by adding ...
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2answers
149 views

Is “Me” instead of “I” as a nominative pronoun actually acceptable?

TL;DR; Has 'Me and whoever' long become acceptable usage in informal speech? In the comments on this answer on ELL, I corrected the usage of "me" instead of "I". "My boyfriend and I.. " 😁 ...
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5answers
319 views

Is “there's no chance” the subject in “… there’s no chance she will change her mind”?

She’s very determined and there’s no chance she will change her mind. I try to understand what is "there's no chance" in the sentence. e.g. is that subject? etc.