5
votes
5answers
2k views

Why put the verb before the subject?

The opening sentence to The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien reads, In a hole in the ground there lived [verb] a hobbit [subject]. I wonder if there are accepted stylistic purposes for such a structure. ...
14
votes
3answers
685 views

Difference between styles of English in technical communication

I have a collaborative software project with two other users. Nearly every technical report and documentation written goes through the following editorial changes to some of the sentences (examples ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
3
votes
2answers
548 views

“Does not make changes” or “makes no changes”

I was thinking of using this sentence on my computer program: This action does not make changes on user's machine. Just to be sure, I checked Google Translate which suggested: This action ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“Already” at the beginning of a sentence

Is it considered good form to use the word already at the beginning of a sentence? For instance: Already in 1930, certain people were watching television in their homes. I have seen it used in ...
4
votes
3answers
289 views

“Today is Joe's birthday” or “Joe's birthday is today”

Perhaps some of you have already observed that Facebook reminds one of friends' birthdays using [xyz]'s birthday is today. To my ears, Today is [xyz]'s birthday sounds better. I guess both ...
1
vote
1answer
643 views

How do you format a sentence to avoid or use “to to” correctly? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Rules about prepositions and duplicating 'to' Where did you travel to to get that? Using to, to has always looked/seemed awkward to me. What is the proper ...