-1
votes
1answer
35 views

A way to describe/categorize music that would rhyme/alliterate with each day of the week [closed]

Good day, apologies for the rather confusing title. My friends and I came up with an idea and started a music appreciation day for each day of the week. The idea is that each day has an assigned genre ...
0
votes
4answers
86 views

Should I use interchangable terms in academic writing?

In academic writing (when writing to a journal), should I stick to the same terms throughout a paper, e.g. Twenty participants participated to the study. The participants received monetary ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Interpretation, which is desired to open two story lines [closed]

Is there a word, which describes a point in a story, that opens two different story lines, which are both conclusive and intended. If there isn't any word, how would you write this issue?
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Can you use “has” instead of “contains”?

If I say: The new ipad has a 4.5" lcd screen and a microUSB slot. instead of: The new ipad contains a 4.5" lcd screen and a microUSB slot. Is it better or worse? Is "contains" necessary, am I ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Does an object have “specificity to” or “specificity for” another object?

Does an object possess specificity to or for another object? Every time I go to express this concept in writing, I struggle over which preposition is the more appropriate and more precise. This is ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

How to refer to members of the House of Representatives?

The sentence is Call your two Senators and your elected member of the House of Representatives. I'd like to say something simpler like … your elected Congressman, but that runs into all sorts of ...
2
votes
2answers
926 views

“They are…” vs. “these are” when answering the question “What are these…?”

When asked, "What are these called in English?" or similar, should we use just the right pronoun or can we also answer with the right demonstrative pronoun? For example, which is grammatical or ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

'Ask' and its objects

I'd like to know if the objects of the verb 'ask' must follow an order. If so what is that order? Should the first object be the person (someone) or the thing (something)? For example: Will you ask ...
0
votes
1answer
231 views

How to paraphrase this sentence? [closed]

I am told that these three sentences imply the same meaning and I can put them together: any idea pleas! Still, domy and duny products have not been evaluated to date with respect to the most ...
2
votes
1answer
153 views

Is it ok if I start an opinion composition with the word 'Indeed'?

I was just wondering, is it's OK to begin an opinion composition with the word 'Indeed' in the first sentence? For example: Indeed I believe people's consumerism is one of the main causes for our ...
2
votes
1answer
545 views

“To go so far as to” — suitable for academic writing?

Is using the phrase "to go so far as to" in an academic context (e.g. in an article in humanities journal) acceptable? New Example: I do not know why Mister X went so far as to assert that Mister ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

A better, more academic way of saying 'whether or not'

This is my sentence, and I was hoping to make it sound more academic: The aim is to ascertain whether or not the actors from the two films analysed can be considered to be heroes Is there a ...
0
votes
1answer
201 views

“Remember those times that” or “remember those times when”

I have seen that in certain places the phrase "remember those times that" is used, when I actually find it more natural to say "remember those times when". Since I am not a native English speaker I ...
1
vote
1answer
308 views

Correct use of “proof-of-concept” [closed]

In writing a technical paper, I'm wondering about the correct use of proof-of-concept. In short, the situation is that we have developed an application/tool to show the feasibility of a new approach ...
2
votes
2answers
194 views

Is the word “dorm” acceptable in a thesis?

I'm writing a thesis about students living in dormitories and I would like to know if a dorm is an acceptable expression for a dormitory? I don't live in GB nor in USA and the thesis is neither ...
4
votes
2answers
101k views

“Regards” vs. “Best regards” vs. “With regards” [closed]

Which of the three phrases in the concluding phrase is most appropriate when sending a work-related email? Could the three be ranked in terms of their overall level of formality?
-5
votes
2answers
129 views

“Hispanic were X persons” vs. “Hispanic numbered X persons”

! Is the following sentence from Wikipedia poor style or even ungrammatical? The 2010 United States Census reported that San Jose had a population of 945,942. The population density was 5,256.2 ...
-1
votes
2answers
685 views

Using “henceforth” to refer to future events, but from a “past perspective”

The title isn't great, sorry, I couldn't really come up with anything better :D Here's a bit of context: I'm working on my thesis and am currently writing down the historical evolution of a certain ...
1
vote
3answers
390 views

“A smile cures the wounding of a frown”

I found the following on a poster of a professional photographer: A smile cures the wounding of a frown The sentence seems awkward and wrong to me. I think something can cure a disease and heal ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“The likeliest problem” vs. “the most likely problem”

The likeliest problem vs. the most likely problem: are they both correct? do they mean the same thing? is one preferable over another?
2
votes
1answer
359 views

Level of illiteracy, ______ of innumeracy?

What noun would one use in the titular phrase? To my mind, level sounds absolutely correct for the former, but very out of place in the latter. Instead, I think degree fits better for innumeracy. I ...
0
votes
3answers
561 views

Omission of agent in active voice

I love writing but grammar is seriously not my cup of tea so please forgive my ignorance. The case in point is: Henry’s eyes were gouged out by George. Is it possible to write this in active ...
4
votes
4answers
20k views

“Henceforth” vs. “hereinafter”

What is the most suitable way to express that a sentence/word will be "replaced by" another sentence/word, from that point (in a text, for instance)? Henceforth called/named... Hereinafter ...
3
votes
4answers
439 views

Number agreement of “a thing of the past”

Is the pluralization correct in the following sentences? To Do lists are a thing of the past. To Do lists are things of the past. A To Do list is a thing of the past. Are they all ...
4
votes
1answer
171 views

Should the use of apostrophes be consistent?

It is time to rock, but don't be too loud. Is it recommended to stay consistent with the use of apostrophes? Should it instead be: It's time to rock, but don't be too loud. If that is fine ...
3
votes
1answer
8k views

'To take something into account' vs. 'to take something into consideration'

OALD defines the expressions as follows: to take something into account: to consider particular facts, circumstances, etc. when making a decision about something to take something into ...
3
votes
2answers
630 views

“Does not make changes” or “makes no changes”

I was thinking of using this sentence on my computer program: This action does not make changes on user's machine. Just to be sure, I checked Google Translate which suggested: This action ...
4
votes
3answers
12k views

1st or 3rd person in CV/résumé? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it normal in English to talk about oneself in the third person in these cases? I’m currently preparing my CV in English. I’m not a native English speaker, and I ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

“Each X” vs. “each of the Xs”

Are each X and each of the Xs interchangeable? For example, in the following sentence, I would use each of the characters: Each of the main characters is interesting. But one could also write ...
5
votes
4answers
58k views

“I would like to ask you a favour” vs. “I would like to ask you for a favour”

Which form is to be preferred? I would like to ask you a favour. I would like to ask you for a favour.
-2
votes
3answers
284 views

“The aims are promoting and protecting” vs. “the aims are to promote and protect”

Which of the following two constructions is correct? and why? Some of the important aims of the UNO are to promote peace and protect human rights. Some of the important aims of the UNO are ...
5
votes
4answers
274 views

Weird wording in our FAQ

This is completely minor, but it caught my eye in the signature section: Please don’t use signatures or taglines in your posts, or they will be removed. Maybe it's me, but the "or" feels ...
2
votes
3answers
60 views

The X is on vs the X is at? What would you describe this variation as?

"The Knight is on D1." and "The Knight is at D1." Semantically the sentences mean the same thing. They are describing the position of a knight on a chessboard. The document I am writing contains a ...
26
votes
7answers
6k views

Using “utilize” instead of “use”?

My friend has been raising a ruckus about the abuse of the word "utilize" in place of the word "use." He complains that it just makes your sentences sound pretentious. u·ti·lize [yoot-l-ahyz] verb ...
4
votes
3answers
12k views

Is it always bad to use “get” or “got”?

Back in grammar, one of the many rules we were given was to always avoid "get," "got," or "gotten" due to their ambiguity and tendency toward poor grammar as in: What happened to your arm? It got ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

“Prerequisite for” vs. “prerequisite to”

When is it appropriate to use "prerequisite for" instead of "prerequisite to"? Does it depend on context, or is it a matter of style? I googled the two phrases and found 4.5 million hits for ...
0
votes
2answers
870 views

Is “upcoming” too informal?

I'm writing a PhD thesis. Should I use "upcoming" in the following sentence, or is it too informal? . . . the modifications will be included in the upcoming fourth version of the manual . . . ...
30
votes
6answers
107k views

Is it “Yours faithfully” or “Yours sincerely”?

When should one sign a letter with "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?
6
votes
3answers
955 views

Is it proper to start a sentence with the word that ended the last sentence?

For example: Instead, you’ll use a higher-level model called ASP.NET AJAX. ASP.NET AJAX gives you a set of server-side components and controls that you can use when designing your web page. This ...
1
vote
2answers
781 views

Starting email question

Please, help me understand how to build a sentence in an email to sound natural, clear, and polite. (I am not a native speaker of English.) Description of the situation: I send a product inquiry to a ...
23
votes
4answers
28k views

When to use & instead of “and”

Are there rules of usage when using the ampersand "&" instead of "and"? Are they completely interchangeable? The ampersand seems more casual, but I'm not sure.
8
votes
3answers
2k views

“So long as” vs. “as long as”

Which phrase is more formal — "so long as" or "as long as"? Example: So long as Google Voice allows free long distance in North America, I will use it. As long as Google Voice allows free ...
3
votes
1answer
217 views

Can one be *highly* ambivalent?

I've always felt that it's something of a contradiction to be very or highly ambivalent. It's grammatically correct, as far as I know, but is it stylistically acceptable, or is my sense of linguistic ...
12
votes
7answers
13k views

Are there any differences between “I believe” vs “I think” vs “I reckon”?

These are the three most common ways to say "I think." (At least, I believe so. I mean, I think so. Um...) Are there any subtle differences between them? Are there situations where one of the three ...