0
votes
1answer
91 views

Can we use both British English and American English in the same article?

Can we use British English trends and American English trends (such as spelling, or turns of phrase) in different sentences in the one topic?
2
votes
7answers
3k views

… is done in agreement with xxx?

Background: I'm writing a professional (technical) report in which I want to express the following in one simple sentence: The whole report is written based on a certain assumption, except one part ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

What is wrong with the phrase “me and my work”?

For my thesis, in my acknowledgements, I have the following line: I would like to thank my fiancé, ----, who has endlessly supported me and my work. My supervisor highlighted me and my work and ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

“I feel it my duty” vs. “I feel it *IS* my duty” [duplicate]

Given these two choices: I feel it     my duty to [do something]. I feel it is my duty to [do something]. Which is preferred, and why? Background: I got confused when reading an article in The ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

Does an object have “specificity to” or “specificity for” another object?

Does an object possess specificity to or for another object? Every time I go to express this concept in writing, I struggle over which preposition is the more appropriate and more precise. This is ...
0
votes
1answer
166 views

Active and passive verb with different prepositions for same object - commas?

I've got a sentence like this: A will impose B on and further be affected by C The two verbs have nothing in common, they both just put A in some relation to C. As C is quite long I don't want ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Should I factor-out “to” in a series of infinitives?

Which of the following two forms of the sentence is better? "Managers can use these findings to bound estimates, to assess the realism of road maps, to recognise unsustainable growth, to judge the ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

I've finished my studies and currently looking for a job?

I'm writing my first CV (resume) before applying for some jobs. Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I've finished my studies and currently looking for a job
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“They are…” vs. “these are” when answering the question “What are these…?”

When asked, "What are these called in English?" or similar, should we use just the right pronoun or can we also answer with the right demonstrative pronoun? For example, which is grammatical or ...
1
vote
2answers
99 views

'Ask' and its objects

I'd like to know if the objects of the verb 'ask' must follow an order. If so what is that order? Should the first object be the person (someone) or the thing (something)? For example: Will you ask ...
2
votes
3answers
944 views

Grammar - Having known subject for X years, I am sure that

There is a following expression: Having known him for more than 10 years since we were at the same school, I am sure that... This sentence seems weird to me. What it is trying to say is: I ...
1
vote
2answers
125 views

Variations on “a [technical term] is said to be [adjective]” suited to scientific publications

(I'll use “spooky-graphoid” as a randomly made-up technical term and “saturated” as a random adjective from the scientific vernacular.) First, when it comes to the definition of a “saturated ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Dropping the second “the” in sentences: the X and the Y vs. the X and Y

Is there any difference between these two examples? 1. (Both) the Senate and the House of Representatives are legislative bodies. 2. (Both) the Senate and House of Representatives are ...
2
votes
1answer
157 views

Is it ok if I start an opinion composition with the word 'Indeed'?

I was just wondering, is it's OK to begin an opinion composition with the word 'Indeed' in the first sentence? For example: Indeed I believe people's consumerism is one of the main causes for our ...
2
votes
1answer
498 views

Uniformly at random vs. randomly uniformly

In their paper "Handling Churn in a DHT", the authors use the following sentence: For each event we select a node to die uniformly at random[...] Do you think this sentence is unprecise? Or is ...
-1
votes
1answer
100 views

Grammaticality of differently worded quotations

In crafting a "homemade" quotation, and after considerable time, I've come up with a few versions. I'm not sure, however, if any of them is correct grammatically, not to mention memorable ...
3
votes
2answers
319 views

Using articles before titles beginning with articles

What are the rules for the use of articles before titles beginning with articles? Which of the following sentences is correct? I went to the The New York Times office this morning. I went to The New ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Omitting “by” after “impressed”

Which is correct? You may be impressed how often the technique is being used in industry. You may be impressed by how often the technique is being used in industry. The first one is ...
-5
votes
2answers
129 views

“Hispanic were X persons” vs. “Hispanic numbered X persons”

! Is the following sentence from Wikipedia poor style or even ungrammatical? The 2010 United States Census reported that San Jose had a population of 945,942. The population density was 5,256.2 ...
11
votes
3answers
12k views

Where does “emphasis mine” go in a quotation?

I have often seen the term emphasis mine used whenever an author wishes to denote that emphasis in a given quotation originates from said author rather than from the original source. What is the ...
-1
votes
1answer
73 views

“After-midnight” as adjective

A recent CNN report reads: In an after-midnight session the U.S. Senate passed a bill Saturday ... Google returns few results for after-midnight, other than references to a certain horror ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “project in hand” correct?

I am writing my MSc project report in English and I want to use the phrase "the project in hand" as a title to a chapter where I will be introducing the project that was undertaken. Is such an ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“Upon” at the very beginning of a sentence

Can a sentence begin with upon? Or should it be changed to on? For example: Upon a decrease in temperature... [Is this grammatical?] On a decrease in temperature... [What about this?]
2
votes
1answer
441 views

“Because of our doing something …” - Is this correct English? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? I am a German mathematician. In some research papers I find grammatical constructions like the one in ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

“Conformity” vs. “conformance”

I am curious about the differences in meaning, connotations, style, and correctness of using conformity vs conformance. I haven't been able to find much using a simple web search, only a single ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

How to use “used to use”?

Is it correct to say something like this? I used to use the knife to open things like cans.
1
vote
3answers
403 views

“A smile cures the wounding of a frown”

I found the following on a poster of a professional photographer: A smile cures the wounding of a frown The sentence seems awkward and wrong to me. I think something can cure a disease and heal ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“The likeliest problem” vs. “the most likely problem”

The likeliest problem vs. the most likely problem: are they both correct? do they mean the same thing? is one preferable over another?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Is it correct to combine multiple clauses into one sentence?

Is it correct to combine multiple clauses (sub sentences) into one? For example, let us consider this sentence: On managerial side, I am experienced in accounting software, have been working ...
1
vote
7answers
3k views

Past participle after noun: “proposed cost” vs. “cost proposed”

I have the following two examples: Our proposed cost is expensive. Our cost proposed is expensive. Is there any difference between them? Or is the second sentence wrong?
3
votes
4answers
464 views

Number agreement of “a thing of the past”

Is the pluralization correct in the following sentences? To Do lists are a thing of the past. To Do lists are things of the past. A To Do list is a thing of the past. Are they all ...
5
votes
4answers
29k views

Is it correct to use this expression in an email: “Attached you may find …”?

Is it grammatical to use the expression "Attached you may find ..." in an email? For example: Dear Sir or Madam, Attached you may find the documents you requested. ... If this is ...
5
votes
1answer
396 views

Is it acceptable to use 'that' followed by a direct quote?

New York Times: Even before President Obama declared this month that “I have Israel’s back” in its escalating confrontation with Iran, pro-Israel figures like the evangelical Christian leader ...
2
votes
5answers
723 views

Ambiguity from the placement of a prepositional phrase

Consider: The executive director presented to the board her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds. This does not read well and moving to the board would be a ...
4
votes
1answer
172 views

Should the use of apostrophes be consistent?

It is time to rock, but don't be too loud. Is it recommended to stay consistent with the use of apostrophes? Should it instead be: It's time to rock, but don't be too loud. If that is fine ...
9
votes
5answers
42k views

“I and someone”, “me and someone” or “I and someone we” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “I” instead of “me?” A friend of mine asked me for advice about an e-mail he was writing. There was a sentence like this: I and ...
0
votes
3answers
105 views

“Iran diplomats return to heroes' welcome”

That's an example of the type of headline increasingly seen in the media - I first noticed the trend on Sky News but it seems to have become endemic. To my mind the example above should read "Iranian ...
1
vote
2answers
303 views

What is the proper grammatical terminology to describe this parenthetical remark?

The following sentence appears in this book review: But this idea has been a driving force in mathematical logic and computer science since Alan Turing, A. N. Kolmogorov and Emil Post (he of the ...
7
votes
3answers
7k views

Analysis of “It is like a dream come true”

I've been unable to grammatically analyse the sentence It is like a dream come true. To me, it should either be It is like a dream that has come true or It is like a dream comes true. ...
14
votes
4answers
2k views

What is it called when words are deliberately written wrong but pronunciation is kept unchanged?

For example, Night -> Nite Nite even appears in some dictionaries as having the same meaning as night. What is it called when words are deliberately written incorrectly but the pronunciation ...
5
votes
4answers
62k views

“I would like to ask you a favour” vs. “I would like to ask you for a favour”

Which form is to be preferred? I would like to ask you a favour. I would like to ask you for a favour.
-2
votes
3answers
289 views

“The aims are promoting and protecting” vs. “the aims are to promote and protect”

Which of the following two constructions is correct? and why? Some of the important aims of the UNO are to promote peace and protect human rights. Some of the important aims of the UNO are ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“has” or “have”? As in “X requires that Y have …” versus “X requires that Y has …”

To me, it seems that the following subtly differ in meaning: X requires that Y have (occurred prior to blah-blah-blah) X requires that Y has (occurred prior to blah-blah-blah) Problem is, I can't ...
6
votes
5answers
427 views

Is “i.e.” in this situation incorrect?

I.e. is used when we would like to use a situation as a kind of clarification. Suppose I was to write something like this: Nano-boxes are used in medical science i.e. cancer treatment, where ...
0
votes
2answers
132 views

Am I using “spend a day” correctly here?

Is this a correct usage? How do you spend a typical day at school? What are the alternatives?
21
votes
5answers
7k views

Using “And” at the beginning of a sentence

Since I first learned English, I have been holding this understanding that "and", as a conj. but unlike "but", can only connect two clauses, not two sentences ended with periods. But recently, I ...
3
votes
2answers
718 views

I need <something> yesterday?

Is it correct to say: I need those reports, and I need them yesterday. Shouldn't it be: I needed those reports yesterday. Or is this aberrant usage style simply a colloquialism?
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it proper to start a sentence with the word that ended the last sentence?

For example: Instead, you’ll use a higher-level model called ASP.NET AJAX. ASP.NET AJAX gives you a set of server-side components and controls that you can use when designing your web page. This ...
14
votes
2answers
654 views

Ellipsis that results in one word serving as both subject and object

Quoting from Jeff Atwood's blog: [I expanded the team] by adding Kevin, who I didn't know, but had built amazing stuff for us without even being asked to, from Texas. And again by adding ...
22
votes
15answers
22k views

What are some examples of awkward sounding but grammatically correct sentences?

What are some examples of awkward sounding but grammatically correct sentences?