0
votes
1answer
57 views

Hyphenation of the suffix “like”

I am having trouble understanding the following: "the achievable rate of the optimal AF scheme performs close to the cut-set like bound obtained in this paper" I think that the word "like" (above) ...
4
votes
3answers
339 views

Comparative or superlative to describe a quality of a member of a set of two things?

For example, 'he's the bigger of the two guards' or 'he's the biggest of the two guards'? The comparative indicates that something is bigger/more difficult than another member. If there's only two ...
1
vote
2answers
120 views

Variations on “a [technical term] is said to be [adjective]” suited to scientific publications

(I'll use “spooky-graphoid” as a randomly made-up technical term and “saturated” as a random adjective from the scientific vernacular.) First, when it comes to the definition of a “saturated ...
1
vote
1answer
295 views

Correct use of “proof-of-concept” [closed]

In writing a technical paper, I'm wondering about the correct use of proof-of-concept. In short, the situation is that we have developed an application/tool to show the feasibility of a new approach ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

What is the difference between “left/right side” and “left/right-hand side”?

This question arose in the context of referring to locations in a figure, e.g.: A dot is added to the left(-hand) side of the diagram. What is the difference in meaning (if there is one)? What ...
4
votes
2answers
575 views

Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?

Soul-crushingly bad; heartbreakingly sad; bone-crunchingly violent; etc. I swear I have seen it done, but I am not sure whether it's proper grammar or not.
0
votes
2answers
270 views

Is “faster speed”, “faster performance” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is 'low speed' finally proving its merit? Recently in a mayor presentation of upcoming product I saw slide talking about "faster performance". Then in BBC ...
-1
votes
1answer
706 views

Using an adjective with a series of nouns — “a broken nose, jaw and ribs” [closed]

An alleged burglar was left with a broken nose, jaw and ribs after US rapper-actor LL Cool J confronted the intruder in the kitchen of his Los Angeles home, prosecutors said Thursday. In the ...
0
votes
3answers
103 views

“Iran diplomats return to heroes' welcome”

That's an example of the type of headline increasingly seen in the media - I first noticed the trend on Sky News but it seems to have become endemic. To my mind the example above should read "Iranian ...