Questions relating to proper style or a specific instance of style in English.

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0answers
9 views

Em dash and quotes

While I toss up between the em dash and the en dash, I am consistent throughout one document. However, one thing I have noticed when using the em dash is that when I write something like: Firstly, ...
4
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4answers
62 views

Is it correct to use elipses in a formal essay?

I'm writing an essay and I want to write: These things all prove that Hitler was not a man of his word … So should England have trusted him? and then continue with my next points. Is this ...
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0answers
28 views

How to emphasize one word more than another at the end of a sentence

Which of the following sentences emphasizes the word "crispy" more than "red"? This paper studies apples with a crispy and red exterior. This paper studies apples with a red and crispy ...
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0answers
26 views

Are these sentences stilted or are they are good as they are/ [closed]

"I'm currently taking up a bachelor's degree in history at a distance-learning college. Since history is not a popular degree in that school, they don't revise their history books/ modules regularly. ...
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3answers
53 views

“among them N, N, N”

I often see sentence structures like "..., among them N, N, and N." His songs also became hits for others, among them “Nothing Compares 2 U” for Sinead O’Connor, “Manic Monday” for the Bangles ...
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2answers
13 views

Using similar meaning verbs in paralel sentences

Two letters arrived on Monday, and a third arrived on Wednesday. Two letters arrived on Monday, and a third came on Wednesday. Two letters arrived on Monday and a third on Wednesday. ...
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1answer
52 views

Repeating the same preposition in a short sentence: “I will eat at 11 o'clock at night”? [closed]

Can I say the following? I will eat at 11 o'clock at night I am worried about the preposition. Here you see I have used "at" twice in a sentence "I will eat at 11 o'clock at night". Is it ...
1
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2answers
52 views

Future-In-The-Past Form of 'Should [subject]…, or should [subject]…?'-Type Sentences?

     Consider a present-tense sentence in which a story's narrator expresses a situation in which the character in focus is considering which of two alternative choices he or ...
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2answers
40 views

use of capital C in the word 'Century'

I know if you are referring to 'centuries' in general, you don't use a capital letter. I know that if you are talking about a particular century, like 'the 20th Century', it's a capital letter. If ...
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0answers
16 views

Style clarification for date superscripts, th, st and nd

I wanted to know, while writing dates such as 1st April or 2nd March; do we need to superscript the st and the nd as 1st April and 2nd March, or is it ok to write them without the superscript ...
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1answer
55 views

How to refer to myself in a research paper?

Okay so I have collected personal spending data of myself and significant other over a period of 6 months. I'm quite happy with the data and would like to present it and write it up as a research ...
3
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1answer
53 views

Capitalizing Stages of Diseases

I was wondering: some diseases have stages with specific names, as opposed to "Stage I", "Stage II", etc. Should I capitalize the names of the stages or leave them in lowercase? I'm asking in respect ...
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2answers
50 views

Possibly convoluted sentence, but is it correct? [closed]

I saw this sentence in an email — is it actually correct? In light of the time and effort you have spent and may otherwise continue to spend on dealing with their repeated requests for assistance, ...
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1answer
44 views

Position of question mark after a quotation (that is not itself a question) and a citation [duplicate]

In British English, where should one place the question mark in the following sentence? Was it true that "the food was all gone" (Bloggs, 2013, p. 287) Inside the quotation marks, after them, or ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Is it grammatically correct to begin a sentence with “Which” (in academic style)? [closed]

What references, or your specific expertise tell about the permissibility of passages like: "We shall assume that 2x2=5. Which, of course, is not quite correct, but..."
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1answer
45 views

“Puff words”: What is a good definition or explanation for this term by David Foster Wallace?

The late David Foster Wallace at least once used the term “puff words” to describe, I assume, the type of words in the list below that are not in parentheses. What exactly did Wallace mean by “puff ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Most proper verb form to use in a list of requirements

What is the most proper verb form to use in a list of requirements? Each board member must meet the following requirements: [not have/not having/do not have/does not have] any blood ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Term for letters that appear as multiple different letters

Is there a name for a letter or word that appears as multiple different letters/words. The best way I know of to explain what I am looking for is the comical true/false word ambiguity displayed below. ...
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1answer
40 views

Name of writing style which avoids both first/second/third person

What is the name of the style of writing, often seen in technical manuals and documentation, which avoids using the first, second or third person. For example, if I were writing a manual on making a ...
-1
votes
1answer
40 views

Do all paragraphs have to be narrtive in narrative essays? [closed]

In narrative essays, should I make all the paragraphs narrative? For example, the introduction, the body and the concluding paragraphs are all narrative paragraphs. What if I started the ...
-1
votes
2answers
51 views

Different writing styles - Using the word 'as' too much [closed]

I am using the word 'as' too much. The gate swung open as it was moved by the wind. He said as he looked away She put her hand on his leg as she peered deep into his eyes. I also use this ...
0
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4answers
67 views

Hyphens in “nationally top ranked” [duplicate]

In order to combine "nationally" and "top-ranked" would the resulting qualifier be written as "nationally-top-ranked" or "nationally top-ranked"? Edit: I do not immediately see the applicability of ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

second or third person: addressing a single person in an email to a group [closed]

How do I address a single person in an email sent to a group? We are discussing a project in an email thread that has multiple members. What is the correct way to address a single sentence to only ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Number Abbreviated as “No.” followed by a Colon

As I understand it, the preferred abbreviation for Number is "No." If we want to then follow that abbreviation with a colon, like in a form for instance, what does style dictate we do? Is it: ...
-3
votes
1answer
108 views

Redneck/hillbilly language [closed]

I'm working on a comic strip with a lot of drawings and just several phrases, but they should fit perfectly and be grammatically correct. And since I'm not a native English speaker, I have to consult ...
0
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1answer
42 views

What kind of sentence is this and why would a writer use this?

Look at this sentence "Is there any doubt, demand the naysayers, about the terminus of this continuing process?". What kind of sentence is this called when the subject (naysayers) is put in between ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Wilde's imaginary name Bunbury: absurd?

In The importance of being earnest by Oscar Wilde, a man imagines a person by the name Bunbury, so another man calls that name absurd. Is it really? And why?
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2answers
42 views

A and B University

Since "A University and B University" is rather long, which of the following might be true and why? The research job was at A and B University, The research job was at A and B Universities, The ...
3
votes
2answers
70 views

The word “still” as an adjective — does it have a connotation of 'somehow related to death or the dead"?

I realize that the definition of "still" (used as an adjective) goes like this: someone or something that is quiet, calm or not moving. examples: the still water of the lake still wines (vs. ...
0
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1answer
31 views

Is valediction in one line at the end of offical letter acceptable?

Is valediction in one line at the end of offical letter acceptable? For example: Sincerely yours, John Snow
1
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0answers
26 views

Inverted commas or italics when you mouth something

I am wondering if it is better to use inverted commas or italics when you mouth something, rather than say it aloud. E.g. I cover the receiver and mouth Sorry to my friend. Or is it better to go ...
1
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1answer
120 views

Blogpost vs. blog post [duplicate]

Have I written a blogpost or a blog post? I've seen both forms used but am not sure which is the "correct" one, if there's any.
3
votes
2answers
92 views

When should 'viz.' be followed by a comma?

Some Latin abbreviations as 'i.e.' and 'e.g.' are always followed by a comma. For the Latin abbreviation 'viz.', sometimes it is followed by a comma, sometimes it is not. What is the rule for ...
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4answers
61 views

“watch more realistic 3D scenes” & hyphen

Problem: "viewers can watch more realistic 3D scenes and interact..." Do I need to hyphenate "more realistic" here? I think I do, as the compound modifier "more realistic" is modifying "3D ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Is EndDate higher, or later than StartDate?

In technical documentation, where you have two variables, StartDate and EndDate, how do you say that the EndDate must come after StartDate? Do you use the lower-higher or sooner-later comparison? Or ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Proper punctuation for compound sentence with quote that is a question

How should this be properly punctuated? What is the purpose of human existence, or is it meaningless is the question asked by Juan Valdez in "What do coffee pickers with burros think about all day ...
2
votes
2answers
69 views

Usage of commas and colon in sentence containing lists, and additional clauses

I've used this site to my benefit in the past, and now I have my own question. I have looked through some of the answers (although I admit not every one as I am short on time) and cannot find what I ...
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5answers
133 views

Nonstop, non-stop, or non stop? [closed]

Which is the proper spelling of "nonstop?" nonstop or non stop or non-stop
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1answer
30 views

Proper formatting for names of ships and taverns in fiction writing

I know that the names of ships and taverns need to be italicized in the general text, but what about in dialogue..within the quotes?
1
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4answers
71 views

Gender in “Sun won't show its/his/her face” nowadays

The question concerns the usage of possessive pronouns in phrases like: Sun won't show its/his/her face much today. I saw this sentence using her in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, and ...
0
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2answers
62 views

Use quotation marks after “that which is called” and similar phrases?

The solution is to foo, producing what is called a bar. or The solution is to foo, producing what is called a "bar". Should I use generally use one over the other; and if so, which one? If ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Bold, Italics or Underline? [duplicate]

When writing a letter, or other form of written work, what is the appropriate way to put emphasis on a word or phrase? When would one use bold? When would one use italics? When would one use an ...
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

“doing sports” or “when doing sports”

I came across the following sentence: "Appropriate equipment and being focused on training are always the most vital aspects when doing sports" My question is: Is "when" necessary here? Can I just ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Does using “that” to introduce a subordinate clause serve any other purpose but to eliminate ambiguity?

I've always been taught to use "that" to introduce a subordinate clause only if there is an ambiguity in the meaning of a sentence without it. For instance: He said on Monday he had lost his ...
2
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1answer
65 views

“Tonight let's go with the bottle of Cabernet *vs.* the Merlot.” [closed]

(Note that the home wine rack has 10 different kinds of wine in it.) I've been told now and again over the years that this kind of use of vs. (versus) is improper. Apparently it's supposed to only ...
0
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2answers
130 views

How may I write good English? [closed]

I am a senior professional from India. I studied most of my educational career in English medium. For professional reasons and personal fervor I want to write good English. I am looking for expert ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Capitalizing Work Titles — Beyond General Rules

The rule I'm getting is: Capitalize if it comes before the name: Janitor Richard McGill was a fastidious man. Director Campbell slept in the office as McGill the janitor proofread his annual ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Comma or No Comma? Workplace and Title [closed]

Anthony Martin, assistant accountant, PwC, and associate editor, Washington Post. The commas above look a little too much. Are they technically all correct? Which would you recommend removed? I ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

User tutorial: to be written in first or second person? [closed]

I'm writing a user tutorial but I'm unsure as to what perspective it should be written from e.g., first, second? The tutorial is a friendly guide showing how the user should do x. Example: ...
2
votes
2answers
39 views

Chapter ranges: chapters x-y or chapter x-y? [duplicate]

I am doing some proofreading using an in-house style guide and the Oxford Style Manual as references. However, I cannot find a convention regarding whether to use chapter or chapters when expressing ...