Questions pertaining to the structure of phrases and sentences.

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2answers
55 views

“All I've done” or “All what I've done”? [on hold]

Is the "what" required to come after "all"? Are the following sentences grammatically correct? What is the grammar point here? I understood that there should be a subject and a main verb. In this ...
2
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2answers
40 views

Inferred verb? Is it ok to drop the second appearance of the same verb in a sentence?

I work in a scientific field and when my reports are reviewed I commonly have them kicked back asking to add a second "were" before "compared" to this kind of sentence: The items were entered into ...
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0answers
48 views

How is this structure named in English grammar? (main clause + object + -ing form)

I've been hearing this sentence structure for a while, so i wanted to learn about it but couldn't find specific information on the internet since i didn't know how this structure was named in English ...
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2answers
402 views

What does “It is not everyone who has your passion for dead leaves ” mean?

I am currently reading Sense and Sensibility and came across the following passage. "It is not every one," said Elinor, "who has your passion for dead leaves. Since I’m not a native speaker , ...
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1answer
61 views

How do I reword this sentence as an effective description for a resume? [closed]

I took over the bookkeeping for a small company after they had been methodically robbed (over the course of a year) by their previous bookkeeper. How do I word this in a manner appropriate for use on ...
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2answers
51 views

What is the difference between “characterized by” and “characterized in”? [closed]

The electrode is characterized by the chloride. The electrode is characterized in, that the chloride comprises acid compounds.
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2answers
57 views

Grammar - Is this type of sentence structure correct [duplicate]

The higher is the ratio of the current debt to total debt, the lower is your utilization rate, and consequently the fewer are the financial options available to you and vice-versa. Is there any rule ...
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1answer
57 views

“to + verb” at the beginning of each bullet point vs. single “to” + multiple verbs

With regard to bullet points stating objectives using verbs, is it better to repeat "to" at the beginning of each of them, or to introduce bare infinitives with a single shared "to"? In the Land of ...
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1answer
55 views

Can we omit the preposition “to” in the phrase “be responded to by”? And why?

In an article, I have read a sentence as follows: In the Golgi stress response, insufficient organelle capacity is responded to by augmentation of glycosylation enzyme expression and vesicular ...
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2answers
284 views

“I'm curious as to how to…” [closed]

Is that worded properly? I'm not sure if it's off. Thank you for any help you give.
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4answers
692 views

Is “to” missing in the following phrase: “civil liberties be damned”?

I am currently reading a column by Thomas L. Friedman titled "We're always still Americans," published on December 11, 2014 in International New York Times. If there had been another 9/11 after ...
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3answers
154 views

“Former and Latter for upcoming list: ”following latter“ or ”latter following“, or just ”latter"? [closed]

According to this page, they use former and latter in the following way: “I enjoy read­ing Entrepreneur and Inc, but pre­fer the lat­ter over the former.” The issue I'm having is how to ...
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1answer
129 views

Parallel Structure: negative comparative

Consider the following sentence: "Frank will not be honored for dedicating his time to orphans, as Fred will not be honored for devoting his life to the poor." A better way to phrase this might be: ...
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5answers
103 views

Better way of saying “in order to demonstrate this”

What is a better way of saying "in order to demonstrate this, I will..."? I already use "to that effect" in the same paragraph. I'm looking for something as compact and concise as "to that effect" ...
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4answers
147 views

Is it incorrect if the last word following a comma ends in a full stop and does not feature an “and” before it? [closed]

These are the four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas, plasma. These are the four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas and plasma.
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2answers
1k views

What is the use/structure/meaning of 'had it not [something], …'?

I encountered a question in an exam and I am wondering about the exact answer and reasons behind it Question: Had it not rained, the farmers _________ all of their crops. A. Would lose B. Should ...
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2answers
162 views

“As was his habit” what does it mean?

"As was his habit, he planned to spend the month of August in Normandy, visiting friends and working on his house." I often see this kind of structure:As was his habit. But I do not understand what ...
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3answers
134 views

Active or passive? [closed]

I have a question mainly regarding whether my sentence is active or passive. But also I would like to ask if it has a bad structure? A piece of paper with a couple of paragraphs almost entirely ...
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2answers
63 views

Is “this object remains a valid inclusion in a discussion of similar objects” grammatically correct?

The wider context within which I am writing this phrase is: What is certain, however, is that early twentieth-century piano rolls, while not themselves audio recordings, remain a valid inclusion ...
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1answer
242 views

“It is me whom she loves” or “It is I whom she loves” which one is grammatically correct? [duplicate]

It is me whom she loves or It is I whom she loves Because I know that "It is I" is grammatically correct.
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2answers
160 views

Classification - There is/are

What is the official 'name' for the 'there is' / 'there are' construction? Is it a verb phrase or a lexical verb? I'd say possibly a verb but it must be the most difficult term to Google.
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1answer
172 views

Use of 'which' to combine clauses

Is there anything wrong, in terms of either grammar and/or usage, with the following sentence: "The information age has ushered children into a global society, which is the cause of educators ...
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1answer
208 views

The relative pronoun “which” and the omission in this sentence

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
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2answers
173 views

Is this sentence structure correct? I catch myself using this structure a lot [closed]

This is a line from a story I'm writing: "The blanket had been peeled back, revealing imprints of recent slumber." Is this correct or should I make another sentence for the second clause?
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0answers
148 views

Sentence diagramming trouble with figuring out subordinators and relative pronouns

http://imgur.com/a/dyALV for the pictures. In the diagrams my main concern was figuring out if the use of "that" was under the context of it being a relative pronoun or a subordinator. I have trouble ...
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2answers
99 views

Should this sentence have a singular or plural object?

Is the correct version this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as a genuine part of the book. OR this: But in general such verses have rarely been accepted as genuine ...
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2answers
6k views

Didn't you USED TO or Didn't you USE TO? [duplicate]

I was somehow confused encountering this sentence: Didn't you USED TO work with Annie at Macy's?. Should we use USE TO here since we are using Did which needs the base form of the verb.
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1answer
119 views

A different use of BOTH [closed]

I'm really confused with this since my students have asked me if this sentence is correct or not. Is it correct to say: Please sign BOTH first and second PAGE. (Or is it PAGES?) Under what ...
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1answer
124 views

What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”

I just read this answer on Chinses.Stackexchange, and I see some obvious logical "leaps of faith" that I would like to know their most accurate and concise labels. Many thought it is difficult to ...
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2answers
219 views

When is a comma appropriate when using “that is”

Is there a better way of structuring the following? In the first instance, efficiency needs to be evaluated; the most efficient choice, that is, the choice that minimises unnecessary ...
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4answers
257 views

Is this sentence structure backwards?

I edit reports at work and often feel that sentences end up structured backwards, for lack of a better term. For example, this sentence: We designed a water diversion that also acts as a fish ...
2
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1answer
111 views

“Art was theatre was sport”

I seem to have come across this sentence structure before but I can't quite remember where. Which number would be the best follow up to the phrase "To the ancient Romans"? To the ancient Romans ...
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6answers
16k views

What's wrong with “We hope you will find our Qualifications to be well-organized, concise, and most of all, to exceed your expectations.”

Why is the following sentence grammatically incorrect? We hope you will find our Qualifications to be well-organized, concise, and most of all, to exceed your expectations. I've asked three ...
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0answers
38 views

“an html link” vs “a html link”, which is correct? [duplicate]

In colloquial speech, when discussing the web, people almost always say "an html link" as opposed to "a html link" and for some reason, using "an" just seems to flows off the tongue better. ...
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2answers
127 views

What is the meaning of this expression?

Does "next player's turn" mean "next turn of the player" or "turn of the next player"? Or can it mean either depending on the context? In this particular case the context is a two player board game ...
3
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4answers
409 views

“Social media post” or “social-media post”? [duplicate]

Should "social media" be spelled with a hyphen in the phrase "social media post"? To me, the hyphen looks wrong, but I would like to be able to provide some grammatical rationale to explain why.
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3answers
2k views

“only then can you do” vs “only then you can do” [duplicate]

What is correct in a sentence: "Only then can you do" or "only then you can do" ?
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2answers
1k views

English Syntax Rules Based on Word Choice

I was reading the Wikipedia article on Animacy and came across something I found to be very interesting: The higher animacy a referent has, the less preferable it is to use the preposition of for ...
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2answers
287 views

Is this expression correct “The exercise consist of making something”? [closed]

I posted the following sentence in a blog and the majority of people could not understand it. The exercise consist of making the buffer A dynamic so that the application is able to read and ...
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2answers
354 views

uncommon use of “as well as” compounding two verbs onto one subject

I've got a pretty strong intuition for what's grammatically correct and what's not. My hunch here is that the following sentence is wrong. Can someone verify this for me, using a syntactical rule to ...
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2answers
967 views

“which” as the subject - composing a complex sentence

How is the best way to compose a complex sentence with the word "which" as the subject of main and dependent clause? How about this sentence? Which road to take is very crucial, because that will ...
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2answers
55 views

“Class X” OR “X Class”

A. I will sit in class X. B. I will sit in X class. Question: Any specific reason for using "B" format?
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3answers
183 views

sentence structure: S + 'was that' + independent clause

Is the structure 'was that' + independent clause correct? Example sentence: The major difference about these two groups was that they were composed entirely of young children
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2answers
102 views

“The supervisors can better monitor employees” vs. “supervisors can improve the monitoring of employees”

Can we say "the supervisors can better monitor employees" rather than the mouthful that is "supervisors can improve the monitoring of employees"?
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1answer
187 views

A list of something [duplicate]

When I write a list of something. What are the following correct in American style. A, B, and C. A, B and C.
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1answer
88 views

Can Whilst only be used in mid-clause?

According to this entry in the Urban Dictionary on "Whilst" (2nd definition on this page: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=whilst), it can only be used in mid-clause. I have skimmed ...
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2answers
170 views

What kind of punctuation should I use to embed a question in another sentence?

How should I punctuate this sentence? It seem that I should somehow distinguish the question part of the sentence from the main part of the sentence. If I didn't know the answer, I would first ...
4
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2answers
232 views

Can I put the job position in front of the name?

In military contexts you often see sentences like this one: "General Montgomery decided to..." I am now writing an evaluation about a sale my company had had, and I want to credit several people ...
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3answers
209 views

Should I add commas anywhere within this sentence? [closed]

Our expert services range from preparing proposals of best practice designs to value added engineering service for post-bid projects to field service start-up.
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1answer
2k views

When and how to use the “be + they + noun” structure [duplicate]

Can you please explain this structure? I can't forget the looks on faces of people who've lost hope. Be they gay, be they seniors, be they blacks looking for an almost-impossible job, be they ...