English words or phrases that have special meanings when used in sports.

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1answer
102 views

What is the history of cricket's fielding positions? [closed]

It always seems to me as though the fielding positions in cricket reflect two different systems which have grown up independently and been brought together. For example some positions on the leg ...
5
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6answers
729 views

A phrase for “extremely bad luck”

Is there a (short) phrase or idiom meaning that someone had extremely bad luck? In the context of a sports match: as you would have a "perfect game" or the even more specific "perfect hand" (when ...
1
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2answers
97 views

Verb for coming into contact with another using one's shoulder

I would like to phrase the action of 'hitting' someone with one's shoulder, perhaps in a single word. Disappointingly, shoulder is already an actively used verb for a different action entirely: ...
0
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2answers
70 views

Generalization of “player” and “team” in sports [duplicate]

In a programming context, I need to refer to players and teams interchangeably (in sports). I'm looking for a word - noun or adjective - that would be a generalization of those two terms. I can't seem ...
2
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3answers
54 views

Becoming the marathon “leader”, is this a correct usage?

What do we call the athlete who is in first place , leading the marathon or running in front of the other runners in a race? Is leader an appropriate word to describe this runner?
0
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1answer
117 views

Pluralisation of sports teams in British and American English [duplicate]

Why do British and American English differ in this respect: British Southampton are eyeing up a ready-made replacement for Luke Shaw American Southampton is eyeing up a ready-made ...
1
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2answers
75 views

How do you call the automatic bike pedals in English

I mean those kind of bicycle pedals where you have special shoes and engage the sole to the pedal. In spanish it's pedales automaticos and in german: 'Klickis' or 'Klickpedale'. Thanks in advance
0
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1answer
457 views

Origin of the expression “you can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else”

I discovered this expression: You can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else I heard this expression from one of the NBA basketball TV commentators on Fox Sports Oklahoma, who uses ...
12
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4answers
1k views

Is there a single term for the sports “surfing”, “skateboarding”, and “snowboarding”?

The three sports "surfing", "skateboarding", and "snowboarding" share a lot of similarities, historical roots, and sometimes appear together in topical magazines. Is there a single term to call these ...
4
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3answers
566 views

What is the origin of gully and googly in cricket?

The OED supplies no clue to the origin of either gully or googly. It does not in fact mention etymology of the cricket sense of gully, which has led me to infer that it is from the ordinary meaning of ...
5
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5answers
171 views

Baseball metaphor, equivalent to 'lay your body on the line'

The English expression 'you need to be prepared to lay your body on the line' is a football metaphor, referring to the potentially painful act of lying down on the goal line to prevent a goal being ...
0
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1answer
56 views

What is the origin of the phrase “bush league”?

I know it's baseball terminology, but I've never heard anyone explain why a feeder or low-level league is associated with shrubs. Is there some relation in the phrase to "farm system"?
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4answers
14k views

Push-up vs.Press-up

What's the difference between push-ups and press-ups? I browsed the Internet but it seems that both words are used interchangeably.
9
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2answers
12k views

Meaning and etymology of “Hat-trick” and “Brace”

We all know that in the footballing world, when someone scores 3 goals, they call it a Hat-trick and when two, a Brace. I was wondering how these words are related to numbers 3 and 2? Is there any ...
5
votes
2answers
698 views

Capo = Cheerleader?

I noticed that the demi-official USA national (soccer) team supporter's group has a name for the folks who lead their section of the stands in chants/cheers; a word I'd never seen used for that ...
1
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5answers
517 views

Special words in soccer [closed]

I would like to know a couple of words so special about soccer even Google can't help me. How is the "gate" called (if you make the score, you kick the ball into the "gate". We call it "gate" (maybe ...
0
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0answers
2k views

“India have won” vs. “India has won” [duplicate]

I would like to know when to use singular or plural verb agreement when talking about a country. E.g., India have won the match. India has won the match. Which statement is grammatical? ...
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4answers
4k views

Why is poker a “sport” and not just a “game?” [closed]

So, first off, as tempting as it might be to do so, this is not an invitation to wax poetic on poker. I actually don't play it, but I know how it works. The question really is one of etymology. ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the origin of the word “whitewash” in the context of sports?

The term whitewash is used in sports to describe a situation where the opponents are beaten in a series of matches failing to register a single win. Merriam-Webster defines it as :- to hold (an ...
0
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3answers
256 views

“Make a score of”

Besides for telling the score on a test (as in "He made a score of 88 out of 100 on the test"), can the phrase "to make a score of" be used to describe the score in a soccer/association football ...
3
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4answers
5k views

basketball expression 'from downtown'

In NBA basketball, TV commentators use the expression "shoot from downtown" when a player shoots beyond the 3-point line. What is the origin of this expression?
3
votes
1answer
131 views

'Comes in' instead of 'is coming in' or 'came in' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is the historical present tense used so often by sports broadcasters? Yesterday I watched a basketball game. There was a substitution, and a commentator said “Vince ...
3
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1answer
90 views

OED Appeals: Antedatings of football “header”

The OED has made a public appeal for help in tracing the history of some English words, including: header noun earlier than 1891 OED researchers have traced the history of header in the ...
5
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1answer
4k views

Is 'deuce' (tennis) a corruption of the French phrase 'à deux de jeu'?

The scoring system of tennis is somewhat arcane and the origins are not well understood. It is likely tennis derives from game played in medieval France in which a clock face was used to keep score. ...
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5answers
428 views

How can I properly indicate a “day off” in a tournament using “sports terms”?

When showing a tournament calendar with an odd number of teams, how can I say (in sport terms) to indicate the team that is not playing on a given match day? For example a tournament with five teams ...
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2answers
1k views

When did “crew” become a sport? When did “crew team” come into use?

When I was a child, there was a sport called rowing; if four or more people rowed together in the same boat, they would be known as a crew. At some point, either before or during my childhood, the ...
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3answers
750 views

Is there a grammar mistake in “Ball Don't Lie”?

There is a novel titled 'Ball Don't Lie', and a film also based on the novel with the same name (visit: Wikipedia synopsis). Then the sentence becomes more famous in sports world after Rasheed Wallace ...
2
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4answers
389 views

basketball expression: “Plays with a lot of flair”

This is an expression that I don't really know the meaning of when applied to basketball playing: "Plays with a lot of flair" Can anyone elucidate the meaning for me? EDIT: after reading a couple of ...
0
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3answers
478 views

What would be a good word to refer to beating an opponent in football (soccer)?

I would like to know a good word to refer to the skill of getting past an opponent with the ball during a match. In Brazil we call it drible, which is close to dribble, but from what I know dribble in ...
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2answers
144 views

Synonym of “game assistant”

Well, I'm asking this for two reasons. First, because of my combined clumsiness for sports and English. And second, because due to the whims of my boss I have to keep using flowery terms in the ...
6
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1answer
3k views

Is “home goal” an eggcorn of “own goal”?

I used to think when a player put the ball in his own net it was called a home goal because that's what the older kids in school called it. Then at some point I noticed that TV commentators were ...
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2answers
703 views

How did “strike” get its baseball meaning?

Strike as an English word (meaning to hit) is certainly older than strike as a baseball term (meaning not to hit), so what puzzles me is that the word adopted for the action is the exact opposite of ...
1
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3answers
73 views

What would be a good way for referring to the property of being a Home/Visitor Team?

Is there a word to define the property of being the Home Team? In Brazil we say that the Home Team has the "Mando de Campo" which means "Field Ownership", as in the Home Team HAS the Field Ownership ...
3
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4answers
259 views

What's the most common word to refer to a soccer team's shield (or coat of arms)?

I am trying to find the most common way to refer to a soccer team's shield (or coat of arms).
4
votes
3answers
357 views

Translation of Soccer term: disarm

I'm looking for the translation of the soccer term that in Portuguese we use as "disarm". It is the action of taking the ball from the opponent player or when the player with the ball attempts to ...
9
votes
5answers
266 views

What would a generic term be for a puck or ball in a sport?

I'm a programmer and like to name my variables as accurately as possible (who knows who will be reading my code in a few years' time?) I've been thinking about sports video games recently, and have ...
3
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1answer
162 views

“Touring team” vs. “Exhibition team”

When we are not playing competitive games, our three touring teams play against three exhibition teams. What does the above bold terms mean?
3
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3answers
5k views

“Referee” vs. “umpire” vs. “judge”

What is the difference between referee, umpire and judge? How about the use of other similar words? In sports like tennis, basketball, football and soccer, when do we use which?
4
votes
2answers
666 views

Meaning of some sentences from sports pages of newspapers

I was studying some vocabulary about sports pages of the newspapers from a book. The book mentions that the sportswriters are masters of English language and states how well they attract readers to ...
6
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4answers
2k views

“Cleats” vs. “soccer shoes”

I used to say cleats but found it uncommon for some people, though I had no trouble with soccer shoes. I have always lived in a Spanish-speaking country (Nicaragua) so I find it hard to know why that ...
3
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4answers
6k views

What's the meaning for 'de' in “Tour de France”?

What's the exact meaning for 'de' in Tour de France? Can I describe an riding event like 'Tour de Hainan Island'? Assuming I riding around Hainan island by cycling.
3
votes
3answers
264 views

How can I call the type of kicks in football (soccer) in one or two words?

Corner kick, free kick, penalty kick — how can I call those kicks? "Deadplay kicks", "fixed kicks"? Is there any special naming for this type of kicks?
0
votes
1answer
728 views

“Center” or “centre” in sports vocabulary? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Similar words that change from “-ter” to “tre” I am researching some stuff about football (soccer), and I came across the words center and ...
17
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7answers
6k views

Is “below par” good or bad?

I realize a lot of English expressions derive from sports: "his presentation was a slam-dunk," "she really fumbled through that," or "that's pretty much par for the course." I don't play golf, but I ...
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5answers
1k views

Why are “batsmen” becoming “batters”?

Flapping my ears near other people's conversations, as I am wont to do, I have noticed that the people we used to call batsmen have (it would seem) turned into batters. Does anyone know why this ...
1
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2answers
464 views

Sports: opposite of an upset

What's the opposite of an upset in sports. Maybe "expected outcome"... Terser would be better, but I'd hear anything that came to mind.
3
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1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “Cross Country Running” and “Trail Running”?

"Trail running" shoes differs markedly from "road running" shoes and "track running" shoes. I can understand these categories. But I also found an event entitled "Cross Country Running Event". Can the ...
2
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3answers
192 views

Loops vs Laps for runner?

When I read some events map, I found loops used wildly. But some equipment watches like Timex used laps. What's the difference, how can I use them correctly? Please also give some sample if possible.
4
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3answers
793 views

Why is a bad bowler called a 'pie-thrower'?

A poor bowler is called a 'pie-thrower' or a 'pie-chucker'. Does anyone know why this is so; particularly, why 'pie' was adopted for this phrase when it could have been just about anything?
7
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3answers
157 views

“Tourists” for visiting sports team

In news about English and "Commonwealth" team sports (e.g., rugby, cricket), I occasionally hear the visiting team being referred to as "tourists" (e.g., "the tourists won the match ..."). This usage ...