English words or phrases that have special meanings when used in sports.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
28 views

How to describe the lower area of upper ray in a 'hockey stick'-shape angle?

I am trying to describe the area depicted below. It is the beginning of the upper ray coming from the vertex of the obtuse angle in a 'hockey stick'-shaped function. (In other words, it's an area past ...
3
votes
3answers
53 views

What's the word for an incompetent athlete?

What would you call an athlete who is weak, slow-moving, in bad shape etc. As in, for example, "No wonder he won in a fight with Kyle, that guy is just a ___." As you can tell, I am looking ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

What is a specific name for this type of shirt? [closed]

I'm basically talking about the shirts that we usually wear to play sports like tennis and soccer
3
votes
4answers
97 views

Is there a SPORTS PHRASE [in particular, one relating to “soccer”] similar to “make sure all our bases are covered”?

The expression mentioned in my question’s title is a baseball reference, of course, which I fear could potentially limit its understandability to only those English speakers who are familiar with that ...
7
votes
1answer
139 views

Origin and earliest recorded use of 'fungo'

In baseball, a fungo bat is, according to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003), "a long thin bat used for hitting fungoes," and a fungo is either "a fly ball hit esp. for practice ...
2
votes
0answers
66 views

Sporting homonyms [closed]

"Golf club" is an interesting phrase because it is equally the implement used to play the game and also the place where the game is played. Can you give any other example like this? A single clear, ...
3
votes
2answers
211 views

In Baseball, is there a specific term for the team that bats second?

I am studying the similarities between Cricket and Baseball. I understood that every Baseball game consists of a series of innings (7-9 depending on the league) where one team tries to score as much ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

What happens with the score when the first point is scored?

What happens with the game score when a player scores the first point in match. E.g. in a football match someone scores the first goal. The score became 1:0. What happened to the score? In Russia we ...
0
votes
4answers
59 views

Naming the relation of a competition and its sports

I'm trying to find a word for the relation between a competition or an event and its offered sports. Let's take the Olympic Games for example: The event would be the Olympic Games. You can ...
1
vote
1answer
179 views

In British English, is there a difference between a match and fixture in football?

Or are they synonyms? My guess is that fixtures are matches that haven't been played yet...
2
votes
2answers
65 views

Origin of Soccer

What is called football in most of countries, called soccer in US. However, there are some inconsistent usage of these terms. For example, in Australia, they have Football Federation Australia (FFA) ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

What do you say in garden or street cricket to indicate you have completed your run?

In an improvised game of cricket - in the park, the garden or in the street or playground - there is usually just one wicket, and only one batsman. At the bowler's end there is often just a single ...
1
vote
1answer
364 views

Does the verb 'to tank' meaning to lose deliberately, or fail to finish, only apply to lawn tennis?

The Australian tennis star, Nick Kyrgios, is proposed in the Australian press to have tanked in his second set at Wimbledon, yesterday. According to the OED sense 6 of tank when used as a verb ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

What does “taped” mean in this sentence?

I'm reading Michael Lewis's The Blind Side. In Chapter Three, when Ole Miss basketball team lost a game and came back to campus, the coach said to his players: Dressed, stretched, and taped. ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

What is the correct term in sports for “get to the next round”?

What is the correct way to say that a team got to the next round? For example, "Team A won the quarter finals and got (the correct verb here) to semi-final"
-1
votes
2answers
143 views

Why does the word “dodgeball” focus on the defensive skills instead of the offensive skills?

I'm a Dutch user, and in Dutch, dodgeball is called "trefbal" (literally hitball), referring to what the person with the ball is trying to do. In English, Dodgeball refers to the action that the ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Word that describes either a team or a single player

What is a good word for describing an entity (usually in a sports event) that can consist of one or more players? The idea is to give a name to a class (in code) for such a group (or player) within a ...
2
votes
3answers
276 views

Why do cricket and baseball each use the term 'pitch' but in different senses?

I should say from the outset that I do know the answer to this question, because I have just researched it. But it is so interesting that I felt it was worth an airing. I am not clear if it is 'off-...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the origin of “choke in the clutch”?

I've seen this phrase in several sports stories recently, and I believe it goes back several decades. The phrase can probably be broken into two parts: choke and clutch. I know choking refers to ...
-1
votes
1answer
46 views

Is it “Breathing in breaststroke is easy.” or “Breathing in the breaststroke is easy.”?

I'm never sure if I need the article or not in that particular case...
1
vote
5answers
140 views

A sports team that has a consistent record of beating another one

I am looking for a word or a concise expression for a sports team A that over a period of time has a consistent record of beating a rival sports team B. It is not necessary that A are better than B. ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What is the history of cricket's fielding positions? [closed]

It always seems to me as though the fielding positions in cricket reflect two different systems which have grown up independently and been brought together. For example some positions on the leg ...
6
votes
8answers
15k views

A phrase for “extremely bad luck”

Is there a (short) phrase or idiom meaning that someone had extremely bad luck? In the context of a sports match: as you would have a "perfect game" or the even more specific "perfect hand" (when ...
1
vote
2answers
408 views

Verb for coming into contact with another using one's shoulder

I would like to phrase the action of 'hitting' someone with one's shoulder, perhaps in a single word. Disappointingly, shoulder is already an actively used verb for a different action entirely: ...
0
votes
2answers
103 views

Generalization of “player” and “team” in sports [duplicate]

In a programming context, I need to refer to players and teams interchangeably (in sports). I'm looking for a word - noun or adjective - that would be a generalization of those two terms. I can't seem ...
2
votes
3answers
79 views

Becoming the marathon “leader”, is this a correct usage?

What do we call the athlete who is in first place , leading the marathon or running in front of the other runners in a race? Is leader an appropriate word to describe this runner?
0
votes
1answer
500 views

Pluralisation of sports teams in British and American English [duplicate]

Why do British and American English differ in this respect: British Southampton are eyeing up a ready-made replacement for Luke Shaw American Southampton is eyeing up a ready-made ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

What do you call the automatic bike pedals in English?

I mean those kind of bicycle pedals where you have special shoes and engage the sole to the pedal. In Spanish it's pedales automaticos and in German: 'Klickis' or 'Klickpedale'.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Origin of the expression “you can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else”

I discovered this expression: You can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else I heard this expression from one of the NBA basketball TV commentators on Fox Sports Oklahoma, who uses ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a single term for the sports “surfing”, “skateboarding”, and “snowboarding”?

The three sports "surfing", "skateboarding", and "snowboarding" share a lot of similarities, historical roots, and sometimes appear together in topical magazines. Is there a single term to call these ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

What are the origins of gully and googly in cricket?

The OED supplies no clue to the origin of either gully or googly. It does not in fact mention etymology of the cricket sense of gully, which has led me to infer that it is from the ordinary meaning of ...
5
votes
5answers
251 views

Baseball metaphor, equivalent to 'lay your body on the line'

The English expression 'you need to be prepared to lay your body on the line' is a football metaphor, referring to the potentially painful act of lying down on the goal line to prevent a goal being ...
0
votes
1answer
561 views

What is the origin of the phrase “bush league”?

I know it's baseball terminology, but I've never heard anyone explain why a feeder or low-level league is associated with shrubs. Is there some relation in the phrase to "farm system"?
2
votes
4answers
52k views

Push-up vs.Press-up

What's the difference between push-ups and press-ups? I browsed the Internet but it seems that both words are used interchangeably.
15
votes
2answers
53k views

Meaning and etymology of “Hat-trick” and “Brace”

We all know that in the footballing world, when someone scores 3 goals, they call it a Hat-trick and when two, a Brace. I was wondering how these words are related to numbers 3 and 2? Is there any ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Capo = Cheerleader?

I noticed that the demi-official USA national (soccer) team supporter's group has a name for the folks who lead their section of the stands in chants/cheers; a word I'd never seen used for that before:...
1
vote
5answers
1k views

Special words in soccer [closed]

I would like to know a couple of words so special about soccer even Google can't help me. What is the "gate" called (if you make the score, you kick the ball into the "gate". We call it "gate" (...
0
votes
0answers
7k views

“India have won” vs. “India has won” [duplicate]

I would like to know when to use singular or plural verb agreement when talking about a country. E.g., India have won the match. India has won the match. Which statement is grammatical? ...
-2
votes
4answers
7k views

Why is poker a “sport” and not just a “game?” [closed]

So, first off, as tempting as it might be to do so, this is not an invitation to wax poetic on poker. I actually don't play it, but I know how it works. The question really is one of etymology. ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

What is the origin of the word “whitewash” in the context of sports?

The term whitewash is used in sports to describe a situation where the opponents are beaten in a series of matches failing to register a single win. Merriam-Webster defines it as :- to hold (an ...
0
votes
3answers
541 views

“Make a score of”

Besides for telling the score on a test (as in "He made a score of 88 out of 100 on the test"), can the phrase "to make a score of" be used to describe the score in a soccer/association football match?...
4
votes
5answers
14k views

basketball expression 'from downtown'

In NBA basketball, TV commentators use the expression "shoot from downtown" when a player shoots beyond the 3-point line. What is the origin of this expression?
3
votes
1answer
255 views

'Comes in' instead of 'is coming in' or 'came in' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is the historical present tense used so often by sports broadcasters? Yesterday I watched a basketball game. There was a substitution, and a commentator said “Vince ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

OED Appeals: Antedatings of football “header”

The OED has made a public appeal for help in tracing the history of some English words, including: header noun earlier than 1891 OED researchers have traced the history of header in the ...
6
votes
1answer
14k views

Is 'deuce' (tennis) a corruption of the French phrase 'à deux de jeu'?

The scoring system of tennis is somewhat arcane and the origins are not well understood. It is likely tennis derives from game played in medieval France in which a clock face was used to keep score. ...
7
votes
5answers
717 views

How can I properly indicate a “day off” in a tournament using “sports terms”?

When showing a tournament calendar with an odd number of teams, how can I say (in sport terms) to indicate the team that is not playing on a given match day? For example a tournament with five teams (...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

When did “crew” become a sport? When did “crew team” come into use?

When I was a child, there was a sport called rowing; if four or more people rowed together in the same boat, they would be known as a crew. At some point, either before or during my childhood, the ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a grammar mistake in “Ball Don't Lie”?

There is a novel titled 'Ball Don't Lie', and a film also based on the novel with the same name (visit: Wikipedia synopsis). Then the sentence becomes more famous in sports world after Rasheed Wallace ...
2
votes
4answers
548 views

basketball expression: “Plays with a lot of flair”

This is an expression that I don't really know the meaning of when applied to basketball playing: "Plays with a lot of flair" Can anyone elucidate the meaning for me? EDIT: after reading a couple of ...
0
votes
3answers
829 views

What would be a good word to refer to beating an opponent in football (soccer)?

I would like to know a good word to refer to the skill of getting past an opponent with the ball during a match. In Brazil we call it drible, which is close to dribble, but from what I know dribble in ...