Erroneous pronunciations of words based on their spellings.

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0answers
37 views

Why pronunciation of “ow” is different in similar spellings?

The pronunciation of "ow" is really interesting to me, as it may sound different in words with similar spelling. The emphasis of this post is on similar spellings v.s. different pronunciations of ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Why isn't 'there' pronounced /ðir/ or /θir/? [closed]

I noticed similar 'vowled' words pronounced so different. Particularly the first 'e' in these examples. For example: Theme /θim/ & These /ðiz/ vs There /ðeər/ Them /ðɛm/ vs Ther* *Made up, ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Was “pronunshiation” ever a common pronunciation of “pronunciation”?

I came across an old prescriptive pronunciation guide from 1843 that says "pronunciation" ought to be pronounced "pronunshiation" (with /ʃi/ instead of /si/). The author says that the pronunciation ...
2
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5answers
118 views

How do I find examples where phonetic spelling is useful? [closed]

My son is learning English as a second language. Of course the phonetic alphabet is something they have to learn. Now he keeps telling me that it is a completely pointless endeavour, because he knows ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Holiday card help

Say my last name is soloniewicz. Is it: Happy holidays from the Soloniewicz's Happy holidays from the Soloniewiczs Happy holidays from the Soloniewiczes I'm leaning towards the number three, but ...
0
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1answer
110 views

How to best correctly spell this sound?

Remember back in school (or still in school, like me) when someone got called to the office and all the kids in the class made an 'ooou' sound with the intonation slowly rising? Yeah... Anyway, I was ...
0
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1answer
184 views

The pronunciation rules of words which begin 'Com-, Col-, Cor-' or 'Con-' [duplicate]

What is the standard rule, if there is one, for pronouncing words beginning with the prefixes com-, col-, cor-, con-? Very often these words have an /ɒ/ vowel, like in the word hot - in Gen ...
2
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1answer
218 views

Is there a formal spelling for the English letter names?

The English alphabet has a common pronunciation. For example, B is pronounced as "Bee", C as "See" and I as Aye. Is there a formal spelling for the letter names?
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1answer
179 views

Specifically, what makes some words harder to spell, pronounce, and remember?

Edit: I apologize if my question lacks research effort, and is neither clear nor useful. Perhaps if you could tell me why this is in conjunction with your downvote, the quality of my post might be ...
1
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4answers
1k views

How should one spell the sound “eye” when creating a word?

How can I invent a word (or name) containing the sound "ai" (sounds like "eye") so that an English-speaker is likely to guess the correct pronunciation based on spelling alone, with no outside ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Are there many -tion words that sound like 'vision'?

Usually -tion words, such as motion, education, and lotion, end with a -shn sound. But equation ends with a sound rhyming with vision. Are there many more? What might some of them be? And if the ...
0
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1answer
467 views

When spelling, when to say 'double xx' and when 'x x'

This is something I have been wondering for a long time. When you spell (out loud) words that have some consonants doubled, you can say those as "double-X", or not (e.g. Allan: "Ay double-ell ay en" ...
0
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1answer
103 views

“P-U-L-L” vs. “P-U-double L”

I have heard some people spell double letters individually, e.g. "B-B", "C-C", or "D-D". But I have also heard others use the word double instead. Is there any dialectical preference? Is there any ...
1
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1answer
125 views

“Did I tell you what happened to him” pronunciation

Today, my American room mate was trying to tell me something and I had to ask him to repeat it three times until I guessed what his question was. It turns out he was saying "did I tell you what ...
0
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0answers
609 views

Spelling alphabet: Should I spell out each letter in my name using the spelling alphabet, or only the confusing letters?

I have a long name and spelling out every letter as "a as in alpha, b as in bravo" would take a very long time. I've heard people using only the expansion for confusing letters like M, N, etc. and ...
3
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2answers
311 views

NATO and US Finance Spelling alphabets - Which is more commonly used in everyday situations?

This is mostly related to US "normal" day to day usage of the spelling alphabet. I am new to the country and most often emails/names etc needs to be spelled and I find it difficult to determine which ...
1
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1answer
190 views

What's the difference between heavyset and heavy set?

Adjective: heavyset or heavy set? With or without a seperator? E.g. a heavy set male, or a heavyset male? Could I say a male is heavy set? (space included)
1
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1answer
540 views

How do you Spell: Smused? Smoosed?

How do you Spell: Smused, Smoosed? As in: "Bill Smused the clients. Warming them up for the spiel from marketing."
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1answer
239 views

Grenade or Granade [closed]

There are a lot of words that have slightly different spelling, but same semantic and sound, such as gray or grey, color or colour. There is also the case of dialog vs. dialogue (*see stackexchange ...
2
votes
2answers
246 views

Is there any reason so many people abbreviate “etcetera” as “ect.”? [closed]

People do many strange things, such as spell "loose" (the opposite of tight) as "lose" (the opposite of win) - and even vice versa sometimes. Another oddity is when they say "literally" when that is ...
1
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3answers
484 views

Are there any words in English pronounced with /eː/ which aren't spelt with a following “r”?

In Australian English (non-rhotic) the word "air" is pronounced /eː/, in Canadian English (rhotic) it is pronounced /ɛɹ/ and most other dialects pronounce it as somewhere between those two. All the ...
0
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1answer
74 views

Caveat - accepted pronunciation(s)? [closed]

I've always read it at cave-eat, even spelled it that way sometimes. But I just recently found out that that's not the case. It's supposedly pronounced as "KAH-vee-yat"--which I've never heard anyone ...
2
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1answer
916 views

Is 'read' the only word that has the same conjugation with different pronunciation?

The past and present tenses of "read" are spelt the same but have different pronunciation. This question is related to the post Why are the past and present tenses of "read" spelt the same?.
4
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1answer
317 views

Different sounds of “t” [closed]

Why do we sometimes pronounce t as /t/, whereas other times we pronounce it as /ʧ/ or /ʃ/? t in town, 'ʧ' in natural 'ʃ' in hamartia/tertiary Is there any special rule for these?
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2answers
673 views

Are there any rules to differeniate when to use the “i” vs “y” in spelling

I am not sure if my title is clear but perhaps this example will clear things up. I wanted to write the word "amygdala", I sounded it out and concluded that it must be spelt "amigdala". When I ...
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2answers
400 views

What is “Gatcha” short for?

What is gatcha short for? Is it standard English, or is it used in the spoken language only?
3
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1answer
936 views

How to pronounce “often” [duplicate]

At the website where people pronounce words from their languages, the page for the word often gives 15 accounts. 13 people pronounced it with silent t (ofen), and only 2 with strong t (ofTen). But ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Differing pronunciations of “divisive”

I've always pronounced it dɪˈvaɪsɪv (rhymes with incisive). Today at his press conference, President Obama pronounced it dɪˈvɪsɪv (rhymes with dismissive). I've heard the latter pronunciation off ...
12
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5answers
2k views

How should “often” be pronounced?

I heard people saying "Of-fen" as well as "Of-ton". Till now I have been using the first one but few days ago I had an interviewer who pronounced often "Of-Ton" while interviewing.
10
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8answers
4k views

In what dialects does “often” rhyme with “soften”?

I believe in most English dialects soften is pronounced without a t sound. In some dialects, often is similar, but in others a t sound is quite evident in often. I'm interested not only in which ...
9
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2answers
772 views

Pronunciation: ‘lousy’ vs. ‘mousy’. Why?

Inspired by comments on Proper use of the word “lousy”?: The word lousy is traditionally pronounced with a /z/ sound, as though it were louzy.* Contrastingly, the word mousy is always pronounced ...
11
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5answers
694 views

Pronunciation of “often” [duplicate]

How should often be pronounced in formal speech? "off-ten" or "of-fen"?