Questions about spoken English.

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2
votes
1answer
435 views

Is there a word that means English-Language-Centric?

There was an argument about how someone spelled "Revolution" and they said "No, I did not write it incorrectly. I used the Spanish version: 'Revuloción' without the accented o to make my life a little ...
4
votes
1answer
11k views

Is it necessary to begin a new paragraph after a person speaks?

When I was in school, I was taught to always begin a new paragraph after a quotation or after a speaker concludes a segment of dialogue. However, in recent years, I have seen authors abandon this ...
6
votes
2answers
544 views

What happened to voiced velar fricative [ɣ] and velar approximant [ɰ] in English language?

The voiced velar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in various spoken languages. Wikipedia says that it is not found in English today, but did exist in Old English.1 Why did this sound ...
26
votes
12answers
5k views

Just how offensive are the terms “retarded” and “gay”?

My college-age son and his friends use the terms "retarded" and "gay" pretty much interchangeably to mean substandard, bad, lame (in the sense of ineffectual or weak) or just plain wrong. I've ...
2
votes
0answers
610 views

Appearance of “is is” in speech patterns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “The thing is, is that…” Why do some people say “the reason is is that,” with “is” twice in a row? For the past few years I've been noticing a curious phenomenon. ...
2
votes
10answers
36k views

Indirectly saying “I love you”

I want tell to someone "I love you", but not in that manner (indirectly but to get that idea). How can I do it in a modern way?
3
votes
0answers
364 views

Distinguishing Australian, English, South African accents [closed]

I have attended courses in English over many years, and as most of my English teachers have an Algerian accent, I have always wondered about the question of accents. I can distinguish an American ...
1
vote
0answers
77 views

Is “church” one syllable or two? [duplicate]

I read like twenty years ago that the word "church" (clutch, hatch, match) is undoubtedly one syllable when written but that an argument can be made that it's two syllables -- CHUR-ch -- when spoken. ...
8
votes
1answer
634 views

What does “I have no shame when it comes to ignorance” mean? [closed]

Does it mean one chooses to be ignorant regardless of shame, or submit to shame while admitting ignorance? Interviewer: Tell me about your first felony arrest? Candidate: I have no shame when it ...
1
vote
2answers
912 views

In Oral english, can we reply “I think so” to an interrogative sentence?

For instance, in Spoken English: Q: Has anyone seen my torch? A: I think so. / I don’t think so. Or it is better to reply with a yes or no, such as: Q: Has anyone seen my torch? A: Yeah, ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Use of the word 'relishing'

Recently when talking to a friend about the lack of elevators in Asia he told me. You should be relishing stairs As a native English speaker the use of the word 'relishing' here sounded strange ...
4
votes
3answers
334 views

Is there a term for speaking English with a foreign accent to make it easier for foreigners to understand?

I was just recalling Joey Barton's interview with the French media in which he speaks with a French accent, seemingly to make it easier for his audience to understand. As humourous as it may be, is ...
1
vote
0answers
138 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
0
votes
0answers
186 views

Meaning of “well” in full and meaningful sentences

In everyday English, people use "well" in their speech very loosely. "Well, I don't know." "Well yeah!" "Oh well..." ...etc. I know "well" has different meanings and emotions attached to them, ...
1
vote
5answers
236 views

How can I describe a passive type of touching?

If I touch an item (like a book) intentionally, I might say I touch the book. Now, if this had happened without my being aware of it, I would not say that I touched it, but I also would not say ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Are there rules of pronunciation for words in English? [closed]

I know that there is at least one language we can pronounce based on the word's form (Vietnamese) which means that once you know how to write it, you will also know how to pronounce it. But in ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

How can we distinguish “uptalk” from a real question?

uptalk or high rising terminals is an intonation pattern where declarative statements occur with yes/no question intonation. "It is used when the speaker is establishing common ground with the ...
1
vote
3answers
690 views

spoken exam/speaking exam

Here's the test: We hope you will be able to pass the __________ examination (speak). I'm confused with those two words: "spoken exam" and "speaking exam". I know they say "spoken English exam" and ...
1
vote
2answers
308 views

How do I respond politely to a salesperson? [closed]

When a sales assistant asks "Can I help you?", can I respond with "No, thanks" ? Or are there more common ways of responding, instead of using "No, thanks" ?
0
votes
2answers
128 views

“I would've been” or “I should've been”

When on a job interview and asked: Tell us more about yourself. How do I say something like: ...Well, I would've been a father but sadly my son died due to cord constriction... My son died ...
-1
votes
1answer
165 views

Is it possible to think in English? [closed]

Someone who learned English, Is it possible to think in English this person? to be like mother tongue or like a baby born in America.
6
votes
11answers
2k views

Fun and enjoyable ways to practice pronunciation?

English is not my native language and I'm really proud of being able to write it quite well. I have lots of problems with pronunciation though. In Finnish most words are pronounced the same as they ...
2
votes
1answer
130 views

How can I improve my pronunciation? [closed]

I've left high school and we don't study English at University and I feel that I haven't learnt to pronounce at all yet. What habits or routines can I do to speak better and fluent? Thank you so ...
16
votes
13answers
17k views

Why are movies so hard to understand (and what can you do about it)?

I have been learning English for many, many years now and think I have acquired quite some mastery. Yesterday I saw just another English (American) flick and thought it was a different language, but ...
0
votes
4answers
6k views

“Unconscious” versus “nonconscious” in everyday dialogue

These words have subtle distinctions in related research fields, but even there are often considered interchangeable or just an matter of tradition/trendiness in a particular field. Since I am a bit ...
-1
votes
2answers
216 views

How often do we use the “future perfect continuous” in everyday conversation? [closed]

Consider the following usage I will have eaten pizza by 5pm I will have been eating pizza How often do we use this type of grammatical structure? Honestly, I have never heard anyone using it ...
3
votes
1answer
208 views

Using word “hate” in American English

Having lived in the USA for several years I've noticed that Americans use the word "hate" a lot. What do they mean? Do they have hate emotion attached when they use this word? Or do they really mean ...
4
votes
3answers
421 views

Momentary vs Temporary

Is there any difference? Which would be better to describe a requirement for 1 or 2 days. Suppose I need to inform my Operations team, that I need a particular requirement to be implemented but I want ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Present perfect continuous

I want to know about origin and duration and present perfect continuous change into past simple,by using origin and duration. For example, she started playing the trumpet two years ago. ...
3
votes
3answers
333 views

A single word for a building located in the centre of fork (intersection)?

So there is this kind of building located in the centre of a fork in the road (maybe in streets too). I don't know how to put it into words, but it looks like this: Or this: Is there a single ...
3
votes
4answers
8k views

Is there a standard for speaking “1500” as “one thousand five hundred” versus “fifteen hundred”?

I was asked by a French colleague, and had no clear answer, whether it's more correct to say "One thousand five hundred" or "fifteen hundred" when speaking the number 1500. Putting aside how we say ...
1
vote
1answer
123 views

Adding an 's' to day [duplicate]

Should it be 30 day free trial or 30 days free trial? I believe it should be 30 day free trial but I can't find the grammar rule to back this up. I am trying to explain it to someone who is not a ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
4
votes
2answers
706 views

How are basement levels in shopping malls designated?

In a mall or somewhere with multiple basement levels, what is the proper way to designate each underground level? We have: first floor, second floor, etc. for above ground floors. Underground levels ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

How do you 'say' the numbers in: “section 20.1234” in a government regulation? [closed]

How do you read section 20.1234 in a regulation by a government agency? For example, the law is 38 C.F.R. section 20.1234. How do you read 20.1234? Do you read it as "twenty one two three four" or ...
2
votes
1answer
806 views

Is there a word or phrase to describe ambiguous sarcasm?

To be specific, this statement refers to a phrase in which the writer/speaker's intention of being sarcastic is not disclosed to the reader/listener (deliberately or accidentally). The effect strongly ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

How many syllables does “Science” have?

The pronunciation of the word science seems to vary based on which part of the world you're in. I have heard it pronounced "sai-ens" and "saains" (think "signs"). I have check the dictionary, but ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

All I know vs. Alls I know

Are the two sayings proper English? "Alls I know" and "All I know" Alls I know just sounds bad to me, but while people agree, no one can tell me if it is right or wrong.
8
votes
1answer
51k views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
-1
votes
2answers
125 views

Take my word for it or take my word for this? [closed]

Me and a friend got into an argument. He says that you can say "Take my word for this". I say that the proper use is "Take my word for it". Could someone elaborate on each of those and tell us who is ...
0
votes
1answer
161 views

Is there any merit to “Angry 'on' you” [closed]

Currently where I live there are almost ZERO English native speakers. I love that though. Not because I seek the attention of being the only native speaker around but because it gives me the perfect ...
2
votes
0answers
194 views

Which are the Best sites to Learn Spoken English"? [closed]

What are some sites which have great material to learn idioms , phrases and new words. I want to improve my spoken English skills!
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Usage of too while comparing two places

While in a conversation about a place xyz which is facing water scarcity, if another place abc is also having water scarcity, which sentence would be correct:- I know xyz has water scarcity, but is ...
-1
votes
1answer
15k views

date has already passed OR date has already past? [closed]

Which is correct : date has already passed , or date has already past ? Thanks
-2
votes
1answer
368 views

I don't tell you or I won't tell you [closed]

Is it correct to say I don't tell you or shall we use I won't tell you ?
1
vote
1answer
30k views

How to reply to someone's welcome [closed]

What should we say in reply to a person who welcomes us to a particular place, for example one says: You are welcome to ABC company. or I welcome you to our home. or Welcome Mr. Abc ...
1
vote
4answers
346 views

What is a word to describe the state of singularity? [closed]

When we have reached as far back into some history as we can theoretically go, like for instance in describing the precise theoretical moment when time began we have reached a singularity. Is there ...
1
vote
3answers
9k views

“Night” and “knight” in speech

In English as Germanic language K is ignored at the beginning of word in speech. Night and knight have to be pronounced similar. Then how to differentiate?
16
votes
7answers
30k views

How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation?

A couple years ago, I switched all my personal clocks 24-hour notation. I live in the US, and 24-hour time is used very, very rarely. So, I haven't been able to listen to anyone say times aloud. ...
8
votes
2answers
246 views

Pronunciation problem with “park” and “walk”. Is there a name for this “phenomenon”?

Now and then, I struggle to say a pair of words such as "park and walk". It may come out as "park and wark" or "pork and walk". It occurs generally when the two words are close together in a ...