Questions about spoken English.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

5
votes
11answers
2k views

Fun and enjoyable ways to practice pronunciation?

English is not my native language and I'm really proud of being able to write it quite well. I have lots of problems with pronunciation though. In Finnish most words are pronounced the same as they ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

How can I improve my pronunciation? [closed]

I've left high school and we don't study English at University and I feel that I haven't learnt to pronounce at all yet. What habits or routines can I do to speak better and fluent? Thank you so ...
16
votes
13answers
13k views

Why are movies so hard to understand (and what can you do about it)?

I have been learning English for many, many years now and think I have acquired quite some mastery. Yesterday I saw just another English (American) flick and thought it was a different language, but ...
0
votes
4answers
4k views

“Unconscious” versus “nonconscious” in everyday dialogue

These words have subtle distinctions in related research fields, but even there are often considered interchangeable or just an matter of tradition/trendiness in a particular field. Since I am a bit ...
-1
votes
2answers
144 views

How often do we use the “future perfect continuous” in everyday conversation? [closed]

Consider the following usage I will have eaten pizza by 5pm I will have been eating pizza How often do we use this type of grammatical structure? Honestly, I have never heard anyone using it ...
3
votes
1answer
123 views

Using word “hate” in American English

Having lived in the USA for several years I've noticed that Americans use the word "hate" a lot. What do they mean? Do they have hate emotion attached when they use this word? Or do they really mean ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

OF as a part of speech

What part of speech is the word "of" in the phrase "made of"? Trying to review the word "of" I the command :"Go and make disciples of all nations". Please help
3
votes
3answers
208 views

Momentary vs Temporary

Is there any difference? Which would be better to describe a requirement for 1 or 2 days. Suppose I need to inform my Operations team, that I need a particular requirement to be implemented but I want ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Present perfect continuous

I want to know about origin and duration and present perfect continuous change into past simple,by using origin and duration. For example, she started playing the trumpet two years ago. ...
3
votes
3answers
187 views

A single word for a building located in the centre of fork (intersection)?

So there is this kind of building located in the centre of a fork in the road (maybe in streets too). I don't know how to put it into words, but it looks like this: Or this: Is there a single ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

How to become more professional at spoken English?

I've a big problem - I can type good English but I can't speak good English. When I type text, I can think about what words to use, but when I need to speak, I can't recall them quickly enough and I ...
3
votes
4answers
4k views

Is there a standard for speaking “1500” as “one thousand five hundred” versus “fifteen hundred”?

I was asked by a French colleague, and had no clear answer, whether it's more correct to say "One thousand five hundred" or "fifteen hundred" when speaking the number 1500. Putting aside how we say ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “neither I” grammatically correct?

I'm just trying to figure out if "neither I" is grammatically correct as a standalone statment (in spoken English).
1
vote
1answer
84 views

Adding an 's' to day [duplicate]

Should it be 30 day free trial or 30 days free trial? I believe it should be 30 day free trial but I can't find the grammar rule to back this up. I am trying to explain it to someone who is not a ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
3
votes
2answers
220 views

How are basement levels in shopping malls designated?

In a mall or somewhere with multiple basement levels, what is the proper way to designate each underground level? We have: first floor, second floor, etc. for above ground floors. Underground levels ...
-5
votes
2answers
59 views

Is this sentence correct? [closed]

"Someone tell her that he died."????? Someone tell her that he died. It's his duplicate now on the line.
2
votes
1answer
59 views

How do you 'say' the numbers in: “section 20.1234” in a government regulation? [closed]

How do you read section 20.1234 in a regulation by a government agency? For example, the law is 38 C.F.R. section 20.1234. How do you read 20.1234? Do you read it as "twenty one two three four" or ...
2
votes
1answer
450 views

Is there a word or phrase to describe ambiguous sarcasm?

To be specific, this statement refers to a phrase in which the writer/speaker's intention of being sarcastic is not disclosed to the reader/listener (deliberately or accidentally). The effect strongly ...
1
vote
4answers
886 views

How many syllables does “Science” have?

The pronunciation of the word science seems to vary based on which part of the world you're in. I have heard it pronounced "sai-ens" and "saains" (think "signs"). I have check the dictionary, but ...
0
votes
3answers
481 views

All I know vs. Alls I know

Are the two sayings proper English? "Alls I know" and "All I know" Alls I know just sounds bad to me, but while people agree, no one can tell me if it is right or wrong.
3
votes
1answer
20k views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
-1
votes
2answers
70 views

Take my word for it or take my word for this? [closed]

Me and a friend got into an argument. He says that you can say "Take my word for this". I say that the proper use is "Take my word for it". Could someone elaborate on each of those and tell us who is ...
2
votes
0answers
895 views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Is there any merit to “Angry 'on' you” [closed]

Currently where I live there are almost ZERO English native speakers. I love that though. Not because I seek the attention of being the only native speaker around but because it gives me the perfect ...
2
votes
0answers
145 views

Which are the Best sites to Learn Spoken English"? [closed]

What are some sites which have great material to learn idioms , phrases and new words. I want to improve my spoken English skills!
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Usage of too while comparing two places

While in a conversation about a place xyz which is facing water scarcity, if another place abc is also having water scarcity, which sentence would be correct:- I know xyz has water scarcity, but is ...
-1
votes
1answer
5k views

date has already passed OR date has already past? [closed]

Which is correct : date has already passed , or date has already past ? Thanks
-2
votes
1answer
91 views

I don't tell you or I won't tell you [closed]

Is it correct to say I don't tell you or shall we use I won't tell you ?
2
votes
1answer
215 views

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word read?

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word usually read out loud? For example, with "Anglo-Saxon", do we say: "It is spelt as ...
0
votes
1answer
9k views

How to reply to someone's welcome [closed]

What should we say in reply to a person who welcomes us to a particular place, for example one says: You are welcome to ABC company. or I welcome you to our home. or Welcome Mr. Abc ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is the formal way to say “a bit”?

What is the formal way to say a bit in an essay, for example, in the sentence beginning “It is a bit different from”? Is a little formal enough?
7
votes
3answers
227 views

Use of “well” to signal a pseudo-awkward pause before an impending word repetition or pun

In an article titled “The Ice Age Cometh” (Fortune, May 25, 1998, reprinted in The Great Unraveling, 2003), Paul Krugman writes: Suppose that two tribes—the Clan of the Cave Bear and its neighbor, ...
1
vote
4answers
252 views

What is a word to describe the state of singularity? [closed]

When we have reached as far back into some history as we can theoretically go, like for instance in describing the precise theoretical moment when time began we have reached a singularity. Is there ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

“Night” and “knight” in speech

In English as Germanic language K is ignored at the beginning of word in speech. Night and knight have to be pronounced similar. Then how to differentiate?
14
votes
7answers
18k views

How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation?

A couple years ago, I switched all my personal clocks 24-hour notation. I live in the US, and 24-hour time is used very, very rarely. So, I haven't been able to listen to anyone say times aloud. ...
8
votes
2answers
229 views

Pronunciation problem with “park” and “walk”. Is there a name for this “phenomenon”?

Now and then, I struggle to say a pair of words such as "park and walk". It may come out as "park and wark" or "pork and walk". It occurs generally when the two words are close together in a ...
1
vote
2answers
205 views

Pronunciation of the word 'infantry'

I didn't have any doubts about this word, because as I could see it is pronounced in both British and American variants as [ˈinfəntrē] - as it written - and I heard it in modern military usage ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

How is the sentence “The symbol % is used to represent percent” read?

I have three sentences in my math textbook that use the symbol %. The symbol % is used to represent percent. Usually denoted by the symbol %. Most calculators have a key with the % symbol ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Using “mentioned above” when speaking

Is it valid to say "mentioned above" when one reference to something one have previously said? Context example (transcript from The Law of One): Questioner: George Van Tassel built a machine in ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

Asking questions without subject-verb inversion — a new trend?

I don't know what it is called but I have seen people using the sentence which is the answer of some question as question itself. For example: You are going to play tennis? (this isn't much ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

how to tell if you fall down your head will *** the floor?

how to say in the below scenario... if you fall down in the floor, your head will _ _ _ _ _ _ in the floor. the blank should talk about the crashing of head with the floor. What is the correct ...
0
votes
1answer
247 views

How to speak English fluently? [closed]

I have studied English grammar for a long time. And the problem is now that I do not read and speak English very well. I'm really worried about that! How can I learn to speak fluently?
14
votes
4answers
3k views

Equivalent for “née” in spoken English

Née is a word borrowed from French that means "born as" and is used to denote someone's former name, such as the maiden name of a married woman. It is usually seen as a parenthetical aside: "Jane ...
4
votes
5answers
592 views

Reported to Direct speech conversion

This is one of the questions in an exam. According to the official answer key, correct answer is (B). But I found that the most correct answer could be (A). Can any one please point out the right ...
-2
votes
2answers
383 views

What's another way to say “which station should I get off?” [closed]

In the context of "Which station should I get off?" (asked when you're on the train), what would be another way to say this, without using "get off" (which has other connotations) and still colloquial ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Is it “good English” or “correct English” or something else?

Is it appropriate to say “I speak good English” or “I speak correct English”? I believe there can be varied replies depending on context, so let me narrow it a little; let’s say I want to convey how ...
14
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the best way of conveying respect to elders in English? [duplicate]

In Afrikaans, it is considered very disrespectful to use "you" ( "jy") when referring to someone who is above the level of a peer. Instead, it is expected that you use "u", which is a very respectful ...
2
votes
5answers
351 views

Alternative expressions to 'you have to trust me'' [closed]

In novels, movies etc. especially when someone asks or tells to do something rather risky, new etc. they say 'you have to trust me' which sounds a bit dramatic to me. What alternatives for this ...
3
votes
3answers
256 views

Stylistic / rhetorical device used by Obama over and over

After reading some of his speeches, I see one rhetorical device used over and over by Obama, some examples for it include: large or small wealthy or poor able or disabled gay or straight young or ...