Questions about spoken English.

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1answer
55 views

Is there a word that means news or delivering news or searching for news that starts with “s”? [closed]

I am looking for a word that means news or related to news that starts with "s". Are there such words? Thanks.
2
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5answers
178 views

Can the words “With Less” mean “with less money” without adding the word “money” [closed]

I am trying to write an ebook about the things you can make yourself with less resources and money. The title with be something like "Build it yourself with less". My question is: Do I have to add ...
-1
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1answer
149 views

What does “At least X to Y” mean? [closed]

What does it mean to say "at least..." and then give a range of values? "At least 10" means anything greater than or equal to ten. "10 to 15" means anything greater than or equal to 10, but not ...
4
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3answers
54 views

Just Googling it

Today in class a student was reading the title of an article for group discussion: "Just googling it is bad for your brain." http://qz.com/519155/just-googling-it-is-bad-for-your-brain/ The student ...
0
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2answers
78 views

OF as a part of speech

What part of speech is the word "of" in the phrase "made of"? Trying to review the word "of" I the command :"Go and make disciples of all nations". Please help
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2answers
42 views

Punctuating short quoted speeches

I'm a copywriter editing some text for a client who is a life coach. She has written this sentence which I'm stumped by having to punctuate in Australian English. It explains the excuses people often ...
2
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1answer
377 views

“Who is this for?” vs “Who does this belong to?”

Yesterday I asked an Australian friend "Who is this for?" in reference to a wallet on his desk. He laughed and thought my sentence didn't make sense in the context of the situation. Instead, he ...
1
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0answers
55 views

Question or statement

Suppose there is very cold weather of zero temperature. Someone might say "How cold is that" (usually with uptalk inflection). I think they mean "How cold that is". Really it sounds like a ...
2
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3answers
117 views

Are there times where “wanna” sounds weird in everyday speech?

To illustrate: She wants to try the new ice cream. She wanna try the new ice cream. Are both equally common in everyday speech? What's an example where "wanna" would sound weird or out of ...
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3answers
6k views

What is the formal way to say “a bit”?

What is the formal way to say a bit in an essay, for example, in the sentence beginning “It is a bit different from”? Is a little formal enough?
2
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1answer
64 views

Multiple people speaking to a group

A single person speaking to another person or a group is called a monologue Multiple people speaking to each other is called a dialogue How is it called when multiple people speak to another ...
2
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2answers
146 views

Why do americans put “my” in front of everything?

I watch a lot of youtube, but I've also noticed this in movies. North americans tend to put the word "my" in front of stuff they tell you about e.g. "So I've got my grill fired up, I've got my oil ...
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2answers
319 views

He uses my car for one hour every day. vs He has been using my car for one hour every day

What is the difference between Present Simple and Present Perfect Continuous when we use them for "something that happens again and again in the present". Ex: He uses my car for one hour every day. ...
-1
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1answer
68 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
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5answers
940 views

Responding with “OK” & “Welcome” to “Thank you” [duplicate]

Please, let me make it clear that my question is not asking how native speakers usually respond to "Thank you". Before posting this question I did some research and I also read this discussion: How do ...
0
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3answers
91 views

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? [closed]

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? for example the word Archive can be written as arXve, where X is the Greek letter chi.
1
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1answer
476 views

had not vs did not - past perfect [closed]

I recently watched a YouTube tutorial which talks about right usage of past perfect tense. For negative sentences in past perfect, a simple rule to frame sentences is - Subject + hadn't + main verb ...
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2answers
64 views

Word's meaning in a particular (provided) context?

What does a girl say at 0:14 in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i31s8F0fkCw ? 1.He's got extra ???? Bits? Pits? Either one, what does it mean? If I'm not mistaken bits can be a reference ...
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2answers
102 views

What one should reply to - “Can I talk to Jeremy?”

Situation I receive a call caller asked me;" Can I talk to Jeremy?" What is correct reply and What should I respond to this situation with. he has gone for lunch. he went for lunch. he ...
1
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1answer
87 views

Is the following singular/plural inconsistency common in informal speech?

I saw a white figure inside the house. A ghost? But my uncle had told me they didn't exist. Is this common in informal English? If not, what's the correct alternative?
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1answer
1k views

How to become more professional at spoken English? [closed]

I've a big problem - I can type good English but I can't speak good English. When I type text, I can think about what words to use, but when I need to speak, I can't recall them quickly enough and I ...
0
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5answers
1k views

I got survived or I survived [closed]

I got survived. vs. I survived. When I was talking with my friends I told them, "I got survived from that accident." Suddenly all of my friends laughed at me said, "dude, use proper ...
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6answers
9k views

Polite/professional alternative to 'It turns out'

I have been tasked with coming up with a nicer phrase to use than 'It turns out'. It is to be used in situations like this one: 'It turns out' that we cannot... 'It turns out' that we ...
3
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1answer
277 views

Is it appropriate to say “I've never been” when referring to a place, omitting the adverb “there” from the phrase?

I have been hearing the phrase "I've never been" with increasing frequency lately when referring to places (i.e., "I'd like to go to the Apollo. I've never been" as opposed to "I've never been ...
1
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1answer
37 views

Which speech impediments contain the phonemes affected by said impediments?

There are at least a few terms used to describe specific speech impediments which are themselves difficult for a person with said speech impediment to say. For example: Lisp: Frequently conceived ...
1
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1answer
71 views

English word for superstitiously negative self assumption

Is there an English word (or psychological condition), which describes the negative, fearful, superstitious mentality of immediate self application or assumption? For example if I was to say "my ...
2
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1answer
201 views
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1answer
86 views

What is the practice of using elaborate introductions to one's idea called? [duplicate]

The following is an exaggerated example: Suppose that three people wanted to express their opinions of StackExchange: Person A: StackExchange is cool Person B: I think that StackExchange is ...
1
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1answer
488 views

This is true or That is true?

When someone says something that you agree with, should you say "that's true" or "this is true"? I have heard people say it both ways. My question is for both formal and informal usage.
3
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3answers
233 views

Swear words in common usage by educated people in 1916

What swear words might have been commonly used in conversation (and, in particular, oral argument) in and around 1916, by literate men? As sources from the time are largely written, it is difficult to ...
2
votes
1answer
462 views

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word read?

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word usually read out loud? For example, with "Anglo-Saxon", do we say: "It is spelt as ...
6
votes
5answers
13k views

Difference between would and will

Thank you for your time reading this. I am from China and have learned British English for years from my middle school to undergraduate time. I normally take 'would' as the past form of 'will', ...
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0answers
1k views

Is it right to say “How much do I owe you”?

When going to work today, I stopped to buy a bottle of water in a supermarket held by an anglophone from Nigeria. When it was time to ask him how much is the price of the bottle of water, as a good ...
0
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1answer
87 views

should have instead of could have [closed]

I've heard this on a crime documentary. Two intruders break into a house, a confrontation ensues with the residents (wife and husband). The couple manages to disarm one man and fight off the other. ...
1
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2answers
101 views

Why did people sound differently when addressing the public in the early 1900s?

I notice that people used to speak not necessarily more clearly, or distinctly, but their voice had a certain 'choppiness' to it that you don't hear anymore... Unless the person doing the speaking is ...
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0answers
49 views

Incorrect or just different grammar? [duplicate]

A friend of mine has noticed something I say differently to move people. Most would contract the sentence "we have not done" into "we haven't done". I turn it into "we've not done". This seems to be ...
3
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3answers
542 views

Should the abbreviation 'i.e.' be used in speech? [closed]

I often hear people use the abbreviation 'i.e.' while speaking. It does not seem right to me. Similarly with 'e.g.' — I would always say 'for example' rather than 'e.g.'. So is it appropriate to ...
3
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1answer
3k views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
8
votes
3answers
342 views

Use of “well” to signal a pseudo-awkward pause before an impending word repetition or pun

In an article titled “The Ice Age Cometh” (Fortune, May 25, 1998, reprinted in The Great Unraveling, 2003), Paul Krugman writes: Suppose that two tribes—the Clan of the Cave Bear and its neighbor, ...
2
votes
3answers
168 views

Why did common contractions become common?

Examples: Real life isn't like that, y'know. Y'all are awesome. I dunno why. Where'd you go? This is my theory: these phrases/sentences have been said so many times that people ...
7
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4answers
2k views

Why do some people say “the reason is is that,” with “is” twice in a row?

Does anybody have any conjectures as to why this quirk is so common? For an example, see this TED talk by Kevin Slavin.
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “here” and “over here”?

Sometimes people use "here/there" sometimes "over here/there" what is the difference?
6
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1answer
788 views

What does “Rabbit” mean on 1st of June

My english teacher told me, that is common in England to say "Rabbits" on the 1st of june. What does it mean? where does this tradition come from? Does the people say it only on the 1st of June? ...
5
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1answer
106 views

Writing and speaking duplicated words

A recent workplace conversation prompted this question. Red Hat, the software company behind a popular Linux distribution, came by the office and everyone got some random trinkets, including a number ...
2
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2answers
385 views

Non-standard British use of possessive “me”

Native North American speaker here. It's fairly common in certain British dialects to substitute "me" for "my" (Shiver me timbers) in informal speech. My impression is that some speakers mix the ...
4
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5answers
9k views

In which accent does Lieutenant Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) speak?

I don't know if Stack Exchange is the right place to ask this question but I am very keen to find out: Which accent has Brad Pitt adopted in the movie Inglourious Basterds for the role of Lieutenant ...
1
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1answer
61 views

How can I express this in another way?

I want to express the following sentence in another way. The first algorithm was applied to obtain the norm solution by gradually decreasing the value of X. Can anyone give me some help? Thank ...
6
votes
2answers
499 views

Changing from 1st Person to 2nd Person in the same paragraph?

I want to know if it's okay to change from 1st person (our,we) to 2nd person (you, your) in the same paragraph as follows: TV need not dictate our lives. There is a choice. We can either submit ...
8
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1answer
433 views

Is there a phrase, word or saying when one 'has the thought or feeling of causing hurt of mischief" despite never dreaming of acting on it?

For example I was assisting my sister in photographing a wedding. We were taking pictures as the bride was getting ready and I noticed a ketchup bottle on the kitchen table and the following popped in ...