Questions about spoken English.

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5
votes
1answer
62 views

What is correct: “You've got to be kidding me” or “You are too kind” [closed]

There is a question in my test that makes me confused. Here is the dialogue and I need to fill in the blank: A: You are a great dancer! B: _____. I dance terribly. That is what I remember (...
3
votes
2answers
77 views

Is there a special word/name/phrase for the money/income generated by student while he is in college?

Is there a special word/name/phrase for the money/income generated by a student while he is in college by working part time?
3
votes
1answer
133 views

Linking /r/ and elision

In one of my lectures after learning about several processes of connected speech (namely assimilation, elision and linking) we were faced with a transcription exercise with which I have slight problem ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Simplicity or Complexity, which is more important in speech and writing? [closed]

English or any other language could be written or spoken in both the forms, either the user could use simple words or he could use some technical words, my question regarding English is which has more ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Is the beach of an island considered a shore?

If not, what is it called? I'd like to know because I am making a literary comment on this word and I need its exact definition.
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Why does “Baby Daddy” TV series have a very difficult accent?

I can hardly understand Baby Daddy TV series season 2, so I downloaded the script. Now, I can recognize words and sentences because I read along as I listen. But I still find it a very fast accent. I ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

“is much a news in the moment”?

I'm trying to understand what is said in this video between 00:27 and 00:35... I can understand the beginning, "With religion, community relations and tolerance", but... And then? I'm listening this ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Simpler english by pronunciation

I'm into computer science. My question is more relevant to making computers "understand" english. However, I would like to make english simpler, even for/by pronunciation. It may sound... redundant/...
9
votes
6answers
7k views

Do native speakers understand all the words in songs? [closed]

I'm wondering if native speakers understand all the words in songs. For me it is very very difficult, as I can usually understand only 30% of words and phrases in songs. While listening to people's ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Alternative expressions for “Our university is strong in [medicine, languages, social sciences, etc.]” [closed]

This is in the context of a university president verbally promoting the departments in his university which are nationally or internationally competitive. One way, although I admit it is a bit clunky,...
-3
votes
1answer
500 views

Learning English - How to retell this story [closed]

I'm Serbian and I'm currently learning English. I'm searching for someone who can retell this story for me. I want to see the style of retelling in English. Please, if you can take a minute, help me ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Is there a word that means news or delivering news or searching for news that starts with “s”? [closed]

I am looking for a word that means news or related to news that starts with "s". Are there such words? Thanks.
2
votes
5answers
195 views

Can the words “With Less” mean “with less money” without adding the word “money” [closed]

I am trying to write an ebook about the things you can make yourself with less resources and money. The title with be something like "Build it yourself with less". My question is: Do I have to add ...
-1
votes
1answer
179 views

What does “At least X to Y” mean? [closed]

What does it mean to say "at least..." and then give a range of values? "At least 10" means anything greater than or equal to ten. "10 to 15" means anything greater than or equal to 10, but not ...
4
votes
3answers
57 views

Just Googling it

Today in class a student was reading the title of an article for group discussion: "Just googling it is bad for your brain." http://qz.com/519155/just-googling-it-is-bad-for-your-brain/ The student ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

OF as a part of speech

What part of speech is the word "of" in the phrase "made of"? Trying to review the word "of" I the command :"Go and make disciples of all nations". Please help
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Punctuating short quoted speeches

I'm a copywriter editing some text for a client who is a life coach. She has written this sentence which I'm stumped by having to punctuate in Australian English. It explains the excuses people often ...
2
votes
1answer
547 views

“Who is this for?” vs “Who does this belong to?”

Yesterday I asked an Australian friend "Who is this for?" in reference to a wallet on his desk. He laughed and thought my sentence didn't make sense in the context of the situation. Instead, he ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Question or statement

Suppose there is very cold weather of zero temperature. Someone might say "How cold is that" (usually with uptalk inflection). I think they mean "How cold that is". Really it sounds like a question,...
2
votes
3answers
121 views

Are there times where “wanna” sounds weird in everyday speech?

To illustrate: She wants to try the new ice cream. She wanna try the new ice cream. Are both equally common in everyday speech? What's an example where "wanna" would sound weird or out of ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

What is the formal way to say “a bit”?

What is the formal way to say a bit in an essay, for example, in the sentence beginning “It is a bit different from”? Is a little formal enough?
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Multiple people speaking to a group

A single person speaking to another person or a group is called a monologue Multiple people speaking to each other is called a dialogue How is it called when multiple people speak to another ...
2
votes
2answers
158 views

Why do americans put “my” in front of everything?

I watch a lot of youtube, but I've also noticed this in movies. North americans tend to put the word "my" in front of stuff they tell you about e.g. "So I've got my grill fired up, I've got my oil ...
1
vote
2answers
359 views

He uses my car for one hour every day. vs He has been using my car for one hour every day

What is the difference between Present Simple and Present Perfect Continuous when we use them for "something that happens again and again in the present". Ex: He uses my car for one hour every day. ...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
1
vote
5answers
1k views

Responding with “OK” & “Welcome” to “Thank you” [duplicate]

Please, let me make it clear that my question is not asking how native speakers usually respond to "Thank you". Before posting this question I did some research and I also read this discussion: How do ...
0
votes
3answers
97 views

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? [closed]

Is there a list of English words where some of their letters can be replaceed with Greek letters? for example the word Archive can be written as arXve, where X is the Greek letter chi.
1
vote
1answer
802 views

had not vs did not - past perfect [closed]

I recently watched a YouTube tutorial which talks about right usage of past perfect tense. For negative sentences in past perfect, a simple rule to frame sentences is - Subject + hadn't + main verb ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Word's meaning in a particular (provided) context?

What does a girl say at 0:14 in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i31s8F0fkCw ? 1.He's got extra ???? Bits? Pits? Either one, what does it mean? If I'm not mistaken bits can be a reference ...
-1
votes
2answers
116 views

What one should reply to - “Can I talk to Jeremy?”

Situation I receive a call caller asked me;" Can I talk to Jeremy?" What is correct reply and What should I respond to this situation with. he has gone for lunch. he went for lunch. he is ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Is the following singular/plural inconsistency common in informal speech?

I saw a white figure inside the house. A ghost? But my uncle had told me they didn't exist. Is this common in informal English? If not, what's the correct alternative?
0
votes
1answer
1k views

How to become more professional at spoken English? [closed]

I've a big problem - I can type good English but I can't speak good English. When I type text, I can think about what words to use, but when I need to speak, I can't recall them quickly enough and I ...
0
votes
5answers
2k views

I got survived or I survived [closed]

I got survived. vs. I survived. When I was talking with my friends I told them, "I got survived from that accident." Suddenly all of my friends laughed at me said, "dude, use proper English." ...
1
vote
6answers
10k views

Polite/professional alternative to 'It turns out'

I have been tasked with coming up with a nicer phrase to use than 'It turns out'. It is to be used in situations like this one: 'It turns out' that we cannot... 'It turns out' that we don't....
3
votes
1answer
357 views

Is it appropriate to say “I've never been” when referring to a place, omitting the adverb “there” from the phrase?

I have been hearing the phrase "I've never been" with increasing frequency lately when referring to places (i.e., "I'd like to go to the Apollo. I've never been" as opposed to "I've never been there")....
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Which speech impediments contain the phonemes affected by said impediments?

There are at least a few terms used to describe specific speech impediments which are themselves difficult for a person with said speech impediment to say. For example: Lisp: Frequently conceived ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

English word for superstitiously negative self assumption

Is there an English word (or psychological condition), which describes the negative, fearful, superstitious mentality of immediate self application or assumption? For example if I was to say "my ...
2
votes
1answer
239 views
1
vote
1answer
87 views

What is the practice of using elaborate introductions to one's idea called? [duplicate]

The following is an exaggerated example: Suppose that three people wanted to express their opinions of StackExchange: Person A: StackExchange is cool Person B: I think that StackExchange is ...
1
vote
1answer
654 views

This is true or That is true?

When someone says something that you agree with, should you say "that's true" or "this is true"? I have heard people say it both ways. My question is for both formal and informal usage.
4
votes
3answers
238 views

Swear words in common usage by educated people in 1916

What swear words might have been commonly used in conversation (and, in particular, oral argument) in and around 1916, by literate men? As sources from the time are largely written, it is difficult to ...
2
votes
1answer
496 views

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word read?

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word usually read out loud? For example, with "Anglo-Saxon", do we say: "It is spelt as A—N—G—L—O—dash—S—A—X&...
6
votes
5answers
14k views

Difference between would and will

Thank you for your time reading this. I am from China and have learned British English for years from my middle school to undergraduate time. I normally take 'would' as the past form of 'will', ...
1
vote
0answers
2k views

Is it right to say “How much do I owe you”?

When going to work today, I stopped to buy a bottle of water in a supermarket held by an anglophone from Nigeria. When it was time to ask him how much is the price of the bottle of water, as a good ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

should have instead of could have [closed]

I've heard this on a crime documentary. Two intruders break into a house, a confrontation ensues with the residents (wife and husband). The couple manages to disarm one man and fight off the other. ...
1
vote
2answers
117 views

Why did people sound differently when addressing the public in the early 1900s?

I notice that people used to speak not necessarily more clearly, or distinctly, but their voice had a certain 'choppiness' to it that you don't hear anymore... Unless the person doing the speaking is ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Incorrect or just different grammar? [duplicate]

A friend of mine has noticed something I say differently to move people. Most would contract the sentence "we have not done" into "we haven't done". I turn it into "we've not done". This seems to be ...
3
votes
3answers
573 views

Should the abbreviation 'i.e.' be used in speech? [closed]

I often hear people use the abbreviation 'i.e.' while speaking. It does not seem right to me. Similarly with 'e.g.' — I would always say 'for example' rather than 'e.g.'. So is it appropriate to ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each other ...