Questions about spoken English.

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0answers
27 views

How to get on with my teacher who is a foreigner in the coming semester [on hold]

I'm a junior high school student in China. And I'll enter an international school next semester. Teacher there are all Americans,and I had hardly no experience to communicate with a foreigner cause I ...
0
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2answers
40 views

N or AND in pronunciation

Can I say «n» instead «and»? Example: I like apples n pears.
0
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0answers
22 views

“Boy are things different now” - grammatical structure and usage

I came across this sentence and I guess it means something like: "Oh boy, things are way different now", - but I'm not quite sure what is the correct "general grammatical pattern" of this ...
1
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1answer
29 views

Should I use speech marks for sounds?

If I were to describe a sudden sound, in this example: Boom! Were I to put it in speech marks: "Boom!" Just like in a dialogue, or to do something else, in that case what?
0
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1answer
49 views

Sentence Transformation- Doubt. For experts in Grammar! English Language

I have a doubt that is the following one: I have two alternative sentence transformations of this sentence below and, I wonder if it is possible to write the adverb "sometimes" before the subject ...
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0answers
33 views

How could rhythmic regularity be present in normal speech? [closed]

I understand that English is a stress-timed language and so stressed syllables occur at regular intervals. Would speech only be considered as having rhythmic regularity if isochrony was present? I ...
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3answers
43 views

Using “Putting up” in day to day conversation [closed]

How to use "Where do you put up?". Is it the right replacement for "Where are you staying?".
3
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1answer
72 views

Are some accents/dialects incorrect [closed]

I may not be incorrect in my knowledge about speech, but Dialects or accents that drop sounds from words, syllables from words, or just completely change the sound from words are they correct? I see ...
0
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1answer
15 views

Directing a negative statement to someone that is actually intended for the speaker itself

In spoken English, sometimes people address the audience but in fact, they mean themselves. An example: You haven't been attacked and fearful for your life and remained optimistic the entire ...
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1answer
43 views

Mystery behind silent letters [closed]

I have doubts about words in the English language that have a silent letter. So I want to know how to understand whether a letter is silent or not.
2
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1answer
79 views

“And yet we're meant to be educating them for it.” What does this mean? [closed]

I was watching a TED video and didn’t get a few of the sentences. I hope someone can explain them to me. So I have a big interest in education, and I think we all do. We have a huge vested ...
1
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1answer
42 views

you are vs you're (informal speech)

In some common phrases like, "You are what you eat", "Your actions reflect who you are". Is there a reason (besides it sounds funny) to not use, "You're what you eat", "Your actions reflect who ...
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0answers
52 views

Musical Performance With One Singer And Two Speakers?

What is the term for a musical performance where one person is singing, and two other performers (a comedy team) contribute non-musical spoken words? My friend, Throxter, is suggesting it is a duet ...
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1answer
82 views

Can we say “There should be any problem for Adam to eat that apple”? [closed]

There should be any problem for Adam to eat that apple. Is this a proper sentence? The use of any here seems to be an issue. For example it seems fine in sentences like: I couldn't find any ...
4
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1answer
113 views

History of the phrase “I was like..” or “I was all…”

When telling a story, it's near essential at some point to state what you said or felt. The younger generation uses phrases "I was like...", OR the similar "I was all...", to express a past state or ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Is 'very' with a noun colloquial [duplicate]

I know that we can use very + noun to indicate the precision, particularity. Once I wrote this sentence: I felt like I was with my very family. My teacher said this sound very colloquial, not ...
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3answers
58 views

Meaning and Usage of “if at all” [closed]

I am not able to understand the usage and meaning of "if at all", kindly explain it to me with some examples.
1
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1answer
43 views

What are some powerful speeches done recently? [closed]

I have searched for some English language speeches by great speakers but almost all of them are quite old. What are some newer speeches? P.S. By recent I mean done during last decade. By powerful I ...
0
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0answers
42 views

What is it? “So live with it you will”

So live with it you will I wonder how this structure called, when "will" or "shall" are put at the end of the sentence. Is it just re-arrangement of parts or has any special name? Is it only ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

What is Mother Gothel's Accent?

What is the accent of Mother Gothel in the movie Tangled? In an interview with the voice actor (see here), she has a pretty neutral American accent (GenAm + father-bother + caught/cot, from what I ...
10
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5answers
312 views

Your Mileage May Vary [closed]

In the United States we have a saying, "your mileage may vary", which means "your experience may be different". In English-speaking countries that don't use Imperial miles, is there an equivalent ...
0
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1answer
55 views

Should a stutter at the start of a sentence retain the capital letter?

When writing dialogue for characters that stammer or stutter over the first letter of the first word in their speech, should the first letter remain a capital or become lowercase when repeated? My ...
0
votes
1answer
136 views

Differences between “frank” and “honest”

I found a lot of people say "Frankly" or "To be frank" while the others say "Honestly" or "To be honest". I know both of them mean that sb. is going to say sth. which is true in a direct manner. But, ...
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0answers
57 views

Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
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1answer
33 views

Punctuation: We promise [that] it's a big deal [duplicate]

I'm editing a marketing campaign. Out loud, one might say, "We promise it's a big deal." I believe there's an unspoken "that" in there: "We promise [that] it's a big deal." Would you punctuate the ...
1
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0answers
32 views

Is there a term for using a correct word having a double meaning that creates ambiguity given the context of the sentence? [duplicate]

Tough to describe this in the title so I'll give an example many English speakers have come across: Speaker 1: "Should we go left or right?" Speaker 2: "Looks like our friends went left." Speaker 1: ...
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0answers
100 views

“There is nothing like that” vs “There is no such thing” vs “There is nothing similar”

What's the difference in meaning (if any) between these three sentences? Could you give some examples of common situations when you'd use one and no the others?
0
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1answer
23 views

Punctuating a quote of multiple answers

Consider the following: 'The lecturer asked the students a question. A chorus of "yes"es was heard.' I know that the second sentence is incorrectly punctuated, but am not sure how to sort it out. ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

“This what is” vs “This that is”

Came across the following choice of words from a British-Australian writer. It is not very recognizable to me, and am wondering if it's a question of dialect, or was just a mistake/typo: All this ...
8
votes
4answers
987 views

How to read “and/or” aloud

Is this read as and or or? Because it doesn't sound right while speaking aloud. Or is there some other way you can say it?
59
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8answers
6k views

“kinda”, “sorta”, “coulda”, “shoulda”, “lotta”, “oughta”, “betcha”, “tseasy” etc. What are these?

In linguistics, is there a term describing this phenomenon, i.e., when the syllables of two words are slurred together in the spoken language? They are not contractions. While contractions are ...
4
votes
4answers
142 views

What's the correct way to write drawn-out vowels?

How should I denote drawn-out vowels in English? If I have a character with speech disorder or with a very unique accent, what is the correct way to express, in written form, this quirk of their ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

Is there a special name/word or popular phrase for the students who work part-time/full-time to generate income? [duplicate]

Is there a special name/word or popular phrase for the students who work part-time/full-time to generate income while at college or in school?
5
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1answer
61 views

What is correct: “You've got to be kidding me” or “You are too kind” [closed]

There is a question in my test that makes me confused. Here is the dialogue and I need to fill in the blank: A: You are a great dancer! B: _____. I dance terribly. That is what I remember ...
3
votes
2answers
72 views

Is there a special word/name/phrase for the money/income generated by student while he is in college?

Is there a special word/name/phrase for the money/income generated by a student while he is in college by working part time?
0
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1answer
75 views

So, in connected speech, we can only connect A with B if A is “a strong or weak word” & B is “a weak word”, right?

I discovered this rule in connected speech. I asked this question many times but seem no one has a proper answer. See this saying at 11:45 in this video "My room is on the fifth floor. I had to walk ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Simplicity or Complexity, which is more important in speech and writing? [closed]

English or any other language could be written or spoken in both the forms, either the user could use simple words or he could use some technical words, my question regarding English is which has more ...
1
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1answer
39 views

Is the beach of an island considered a shore?

If not, what is it called? I'd like to know because I am making a literary comment on this word and I need its exact definition.
1
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0answers
61 views

Why does “Baby Daddy” TV series have a very difficult accent?

I can hardly understand Baby Daddy TV series season 2, so I downloaded the script. Now, I can recognize words and sentences because I read along as I listen. But I still find it a very fast accent. I ...
3
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1answer
121 views

Linking /r/ and elision

In one of my lectures after learning about several processes of connected speech (namely assimilation, elision and linking) we were faced with a transcription exercise with which I have slight problem ...
0
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2answers
29 views

Alternative expressions for “Our university is strong in [medicine, languages, social sciences, etc.]” [closed]

This is in the context of a university president verbally promoting the departments in his university which are nationally or internationally competitive. One way, although I admit it is a bit ...
-3
votes
1answer
362 views

Learning English - How to retell this story [closed]

I'm Serbian and I'm currently learning English. I'm searching for someone who can retell this story for me. I want to see the style of retelling in English. Please, if you can take a minute, help me ...
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1answer
36 views
0
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1answer
57 views

Is there a word that means news or delivering news or searching for news that starts with “s”? [closed]

I am looking for a word that means news or related to news that starts with "s". Are there such words? Thanks.
2
votes
5answers
185 views

Can the words “With Less” mean “with less money” without adding the word “money” [closed]

I am trying to write an ebook about the things you can make yourself with less resources and money. The title with be something like "Build it yourself with less". My question is: Do I have to add ...
-1
votes
1answer
166 views

What does “At least X to Y” mean? [closed]

What does it mean to say "at least..." and then give a range of values? "At least 10" means anything greater than or equal to ten. "10 to 15" means anything greater than or equal to 10, but not ...
4
votes
3answers
56 views

Just Googling it

Today in class a student was reading the title of an article for group discussion: "Just googling it is bad for your brain." http://qz.com/519155/just-googling-it-is-bad-for-your-brain/ The student ...
1
vote
2answers
42 views

Punctuating short quoted speeches

I'm a copywriter editing some text for a client who is a life coach. She has written this sentence which I'm stumped by having to punctuate in Australian English. It explains the excuses people often ...
2
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1answer
461 views

“Who is this for?” vs “Who does this belong to?”

Yesterday I asked an Australian friend "Who is this for?" in reference to a wallet on his desk. He laughed and thought my sentence didn't make sense in the context of the situation. Instead, he ...
2
votes
3answers
119 views

Are there times where “wanna” sounds weird in everyday speech?

To illustrate: She wants to try the new ice cream. She wanna try the new ice cream. Are both equally common in everyday speech? What's an example where "wanna" would sound weird or out of ...