Questions about spoken English.

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15 views

How many hours of speech do kids hear before learning a language? [migrated]

Apologies if this is not the right forum for the question, but it's the best I could find. I'd like some estimates of how many hours of English speech kids typically are exposed to before reaching ...
-1
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0answers
66 views

Could you help me to give me a suitable English name? [on hold]

everyone.I come from China. I found a good name is friendly for communication on the Internet. Could you help me a good English name? In our country, My first name is Wenhui, last name is Zhuang. ...
0
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1answer
56 views

what does “withhold no sacrifice” mean? [on hold]

Reading Churchill's speech, I don't think I understand the following "withhold no sacrifice, grudge no toil, seek no sordid gain", what does this statement mean?
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0answers
22 views

Too or Also: which one puts more emphasis on the second sentence? [closed]

Which adverb is preferred to emphasize more the second sentence? I.e. She contacted him in the office but he didn’t answer the phone. Also, his mobile phone was silent. or His mobile phone was ...
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0answers
45 views

Incorrect or just different grammar? [duplicate]

A friend of mine has noticed something I say differently to move people. Most would contract the sentence "we have not done" into "we haven't done". I turn it into "we've not done". This seems to be ...
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1answer
60 views

Is “New begin” proper English?

This might be a pretty basic question. I'm writing a song. It's usually written as New beginning, but I thought that I might have heard people saying New begin. It would sound better in this case, ...
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2answers
135 views

Correct usage of SIC to express verbatim statements expressed vocally?

Taken literally, sic erat scriptum would imply that "[SIC]" is to be used only when expressing a written statement. Can it also be safely applied to express that which has been expressed vocally? i.e, ...
3
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0answers
88 views

Distinguishing Australian, English, South African accents [closed]

I have attended courses in English over many years, and as most of my English teachers have an Algerian accent, I have always wondered about the question of accents. I can distinguish an American ...
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0answers
73 views

Is “church” one syllable or two? [duplicate]

I read like twenty years ago that the word "church" (clutch, hatch, match) is undoubtedly one syllable when written but that an argument can be made that it's two syllables -- CHUR-ch -- when spoken. ...
3
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1answer
79 views

“As for me” in the beginning of the sentence

Could I use "As for me" in the beginning of the sentence? For example, when somebody asks the whole group of people what was done, and one in that group answers what he did: "As for me, I did that ...
8
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1answer
525 views

What does “I have no shame when it comes to ignorance” mean? [closed]

Does it mean one chooses to be ignorant regardless of shame, or submit to shame while admitting ignorance? Interviewer: Tell me about your first felony arrest? Candidate: I have no shame when it ...
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2answers
54 views

In Oral english, can we reply “I think so” to an interrogative sentence?

For instance, in Spoken English: Q: Has anyone seen my torch? A: I think so. / I don’t think so. Or it is better to reply with a yes or no, such as: Q: Has anyone seen my torch? A: Yeah, ...
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2answers
152 views

What happened to voiced velar fricative [ɣ] and velar approximant [ɰ] in English language?

The voiced velar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in various spoken languages. Wikipedia says that it is not found in English today, but did exist in Old English.1 Why did this sound ...
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0answers
49 views

already , southern pronunciation ≈ [ʰɑɾi] “oddy”

Cut to the chase pals Could anybody confirm the southern pronunciation of "already" as something like oddy ? if so, What's its phonetic transcription? is there any eye spelling for it? I've noticed ...
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0answers
67 views

Meaning of “well” in full and meaningful sentences

In everyday English, people use "well" in their speech very loosely. "Well, I don't know." "Well yeah!" "Oh well..." ...etc. I know "well" has different meanings and emotions attached to them, ...
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2answers
50 views

How can we distinguish “uptalk” from a real question?

uptalk or high rising terminals is an intonation pattern where declarative statements occur with yes/no question intonation. "It is used when the speaker is establishing common ground with the ...
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2answers
936 views

What does “I want you to do me” mean?

I read a conversation between two people. "I want you to do me on this table." What is the meaning of this sentence?
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3answers
104 views

spoken exam/speaking exam

Here's the test: We hope you will be able to pass the __________ examination (speak). I'm confused with those two words: "spoken exam" and "speaking exam". I know they say "spoken English exam" and ...
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2answers
139 views

How do I respond politely to a salesperson? [closed]

When a sales assistant asks "Can I help you?", can I respond with "No, thanks" ? Or are there more common ways of responding, instead of using "No, thanks" ?
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2answers
80 views

“I would've been” or “I should've been”

When on a job interview and asked: Tell us more about yourself. How do I say something like: ...Well, I would've been a father but sadly my son died due to cord constriction... My son died ...
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1answer
103 views

Is it possible to think in English? [closed]

Someone who learned English, Is it possible to think in English this person? to be like mother tongue or like a baby born in America.
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1answer
85 views

How can I improve my pronunciation? [closed]

I've left high school and we don't study English at University and I feel that I haven't learnt to pronounce at all yet. What habits or routines can I do to speak better and fluent? Thank you so ...
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2answers
106 views

How often do we use the “future perfect continuous” in everyday conversation? [closed]

Consider the following usage I will have eaten pizza by 5pm I will have been eating pizza How often do we use this type of grammatical structure? Honestly, I have never heard anyone using it ...
3
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1answer
98 views

Using word “hate” in American English

Having lived in the USA for several years I've noticed that Americans use the word "hate" a lot. What do they mean? Do they have hate emotion attached when they use this word? Or do they really mean ...
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0answers
44 views

OF as a part of speech

What part of speech is the word "of" in the phrase "made of"? Trying to review the word "of" I the command :"Go and make disciples of all nations". Please help
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1answer
92 views

How to become more professional at spoken English?

I've a big problem - I can type good English but I can't speak good English. When I type text, I can think about what words to use, but when I need to speak, I can't recall them quickly enough and I ...
2
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1answer
619 views

Is “neither I” grammatically correct?

I'm just trying to figure out if "neither I" is grammatically correct as a standalone statment (in spoken English).
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2answers
173 views

I know “of” sounds like “ov”. Does “I've” sound like “If”?

I was studying connected speech and I read when we say for example I've finished my homework we pronounce the 've and f in finished as only one sound. Is it only in this case or whenever I ...
1
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1answer
77 views

Adding an 's' to day [duplicate]

Should it be 30 day free trial or 30 days free trial? I believe it should be 30 day free trial but I can't find the grammar rule to back this up. I am trying to explain it to someone who is not a ...
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0answers
35 views

Present perfect continuous

I want to know about origin and duration and present perfect continuous change into past simple,by using origin and duration. For example, she started playing the trumpet two years ago. ...
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2answers
115 views

How are basement levels in shopping malls designated?

In a mall or somewhere with multiple basement levels, what is the proper way to designate each underground level? We have: first floor, second floor, etc. for above ground floors. Underground levels ...
4
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4answers
1k views

Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?

When I learned English, my teachers told me that all questions must have an auxiliary verb at the beginning, just like Are you mad? or Is she playing? do. But when watching some movies or talking ...
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2answers
54 views

Is this sentence correct? [closed]

"Someone tell her that he died."????? Someone tell her that he died. It's his duplicate now on the line.
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1answer
54 views

How do you 'say' the numbers in: “section 20.1234” in a government regulation? [closed]

How do you read section 20.1234 in a regulation by a government agency? For example, the law is 38 C.F.R. section 20.1234. How do you read 20.1234? Do you read it as "twenty one two three four" or ...
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3answers
270 views

All I know vs. Alls I know

Are the two sayings proper English? "Alls I know" and "All I know" Alls I know just sounds bad to me, but while people agree, no one can tell me if it is right or wrong.
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4answers
643 views

How many syllables does “Science” have?

The pronunciation of the word science seems to vary based on which part of the world you're in. I have heard it pronounced "sai-ens" and "saains" (think "signs"). I have check the dictionary, but ...
1
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1answer
342 views

Is there a word or phrase to describe ambiguous sarcasm?

To be specific, this statement refers to a phrase in which the writer/speaker's intention of being sarcastic is not disclosed to the reader/listener (deliberately or accidentally). The effect strongly ...
3
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1answer
11k views

How do I use “as of now” correctly?

Just to clarify, I am not a native English speaker. I occasionally hear from other non-native English speakers the use of the phrase: "As of now" with the meaning of Currently. Initially I did not ...
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0answers
585 views

How many “monophthongs” are there in RP? Do all the varieties of spoken English in the UK have the same number?

A monophthong is a pure vowel sound. The monophthongs can be contrasted with diphthongs, where the vowel quality changes within the same syllable, and hiatus, where two vowels are next to each ...
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2answers
59 views

Take my word for it or take my word for this? [closed]

Me and a friend got into an argument. He says that you can say "Take my word for this". I say that the proper use is "Take my word for it". Could someone elaborate on each of those and tell us who is ...
0
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1answer
81 views

Is there any merit to “Angry 'on' you” [closed]

Currently where I live there are almost ZERO English native speakers. I love that though. Not because I seek the attention of being the only native speaker around but because it gives me the perfect ...
2
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0answers
118 views

Which are the Best sites to Learn Spoken English"? [closed]

What are some sites which have great material to learn idioms , phrases and new words. I want to improve my spoken English skills!
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3answers
162 views

Momentary vs Temporary

Is there any difference? Which would be better to describe a requirement for 1 or 2 days. Suppose I need to inform my Operations team, that I need a particular requirement to be implemented but I want ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Usage of too while comparing two places

While in a conversation about a place xyz which is facing water scarcity, if another place abc is also having water scarcity, which sentence would be correct:- I know xyz has water scarcity, but is ...
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1answer
3k views

date has already passed OR date has already past? [closed]

Which is correct : date has already passed , or date has already past ? Thanks
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1answer
64 views

I don't tell you or I won't tell you [closed]

Is it correct to say I don't tell you or shall we use I won't tell you ?
2
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1answer
162 views

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word read?

How is the spelling of a hyphenated word usually read out loud? For example, with "Anglo-Saxon", do we say: "It is spelt as ...
0
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1answer
4k views

How to reply to someone's welcome [closed]

What should we say in reply to a person who welcomes us to a particular place, for example one says: You are welcome to ABC company. or I welcome you to our home. or Welcome Mr. Abc ...
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3answers
198 views

Use of “well” to signal a pseudo-awkward pause before an impending word repetition or pun

In an article titled “The Ice Age Cometh” (Fortune, May 25, 1998, reprinted in The Great Unraveling, 2003), Paul Krugman writes: Suppose that two tribes—the Clan of the Cave Bear and its neighbor, ...
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4answers
202 views

What is a word to describe the state of singularity? [closed]

When we have reached as far back into some history as we can theoretically go, like for instance in describing the precise theoretical moment when time began we have reached a singularity. Is there ...