Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Colloquial use of “to dip”

So, "dip" has come to mean "leave" in American slang. As in, "Let's dip," i.e. "Let's get out of here." How did that happen? The best I could come up with is: a dip in the road obscures vision, so if ...
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3k views

Meaning of “put it down”

What does "put it down" mean in Brandy's song? I tried googling it, but all I got was the song's lyrics.
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1answer
63 views

“Baby needs a new pair of shoes!”

I'm looking for the origin of this phrase: "Baby needs a new pair of shoes!" (Or "Mama needs a new pair of shoes" or "Daddy needs a new pair of shoes"). You see it in movies and television as a ...
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1answer
250 views

“Shut my mouth wide open!”

"What is origin of the expression "Shut my mouth wide open."? Google search for the phrase produced nothing of interest.
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1answer
332 views

Can you call someone a “leaf blower” without being offensive?

I understand that a leaf blower is the equipment you use to blow leaves. Can you also call the person who uses such an equipment a leaf blower, too? It seems that a "leaf blower" is used sometimes ...
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0answers
56 views

Use of “trying to” in place of “wanting to” in the US

Is the use of "trying to" in place of "wanting to" occurring nationwide or regionally? What is its prevalence and when did it start? I'm in my late 20s and live in New England. In the past 2-3 ...
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0answers
104 views

Does “mouse” in the computer sense come from nautical slang?

Computer "mouse" is an English term known and used worldwide. Reference about its origin appears to suggest that the term, which obviously refers to the shape of a small mouse, may actually come ...
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48 views

A Philadelphia Question

Up until recently I was firmly convinced that the expression "youse guys" originally came from Brooklyn, New York. A couple of days ago I ran across an essay that mentioned (in a disgustingly ...
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0answers
64 views

Is staubert a slang term for stylish? And what is its origin?

A listener to Words to the Wise [audio at wtcmradio.com] shared that his family used the word staubert to describe something stylish, such as a new suit. I speculate that it is derived from the ...
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0answers
35 views

“Came at [XYZ] life” origin?

What's the origin/etymology of "[ABC] came at [XYZ] life?" The definition according to Urban Dictionary is A phrase that is used in past tense to describe a situation in which another person ...
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0answers
279 views

The antonym of Schadenfreude is “fribbly” - the joy in other people's joy. What is the origin of this new meaning?

For many years the word fribbly has been used, in various communities as the antonym of Schadenfreude. Rather than harm-joy or "pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others". Fribbly is "Joy-Joy" ...
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31 views

In which country does “protocol” mean school related work or homework?

I was talking with a student online, I don't know where he is from, but he said to me that he is doing a "physics protocol" at home I am assuming that he meant physics related homework, rather than ...
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30 views

using “get + verb(pp)” to replace become, is this slang?

My question is about the use of (get + pp) to mean "become ______." I got laid. I got #%$&ed. I'm going to get hammered. She got schlonged.(Trumpism) Is this slang or syntactically correct? If ...
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0answers
58 views

The meaning of the following lines?

I encountered the following sentence when reading the book "Algebra for young mind": For others, however, mathematics is a daunting subject, whether it takes the form of equations on a whiteboard or ...
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0answers
57 views

Slang meaning of “pod”

From Seinfeld, season 2 episode 5 ("The Apartment"): JERRY: Let me explain something to you.. You see, you're not normal. You're a great guy, I love you, but you're a pod. I, on the other ...
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84 views

What does “zoozi” or “zoozie” mean?

I've heard a phrase in London, it sounded like "It's a big zoozi" or something like that. I wonder what this could mean?
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155 views

What does “do not get (too) vibed that something happened” mean? There is no clue in any dictionary

I stumbled upon this construction: “don’t get (too) vibed”, but I couldn’t get what does it mean. And there is no dictionary that gives an explanation, as far as I can see. “Vibe” is a very special ...
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119 views

Is there a proper name for saying something like “stack'em”?

Is there a proper name for saying something like stack'em instead of stack them or any other "'em" in place of "them"? Is it slang or something to do with dialect? UPDATE It is a ...