Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Meaning of “put it down”

What does "put it down" mean in Brandy's song? I tried googling it, but all I got was the song's lyrics.
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How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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Is there “BFU” acronym meaning 'Stupid Average User' (expressively) in English IT slang?

Have you ever encountered given initialism denoting 'Brain-Free User', as opposed to 'power user / geek / nerd / IT professional'? If so, do you consider its usage 'widespread', at least in your ...
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What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
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“Shut my mouth wide open!”

"What is origin of the expression "Shut my mouth wide open."? Google search for the phrase produced nothing of interest.
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Can you call someone a “leaf blower” without being offensive?

I understand that a leaf blower is the equipment you use to blow leaves. Can you also call the person who uses such an equipment a leaf blower, too? It seems that a "leaf blower" is used sometimes ...
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The meaning of 'take over' in this sentence

I've recently watched a youtube video where a person mentioned a phrase 'It's pretty much taken over my Instragram'. I think she meant 'The pictures are taken over.' I tried to find out all of the ...
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A Philadelphia Question

Up until recently I was firmly convinced that the expression "youse guys" originally came from Brooklyn, New York. A couple of days ago I ran across an essay that mentioned (in a disgustingly ...
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Is staubert a slang term for stylish? And what is its origin?

A listener to Words to the Wise [audio at wtcmradio.com] shared that his family used the word staubert to describe something stylish, such as a new suit. I speculate that it is derived from the ...
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The antonym of Schadenfreude is “fribbly” - the joy in other people's joy. What is the origin of this new meaning?

For many years the word fribbly has been used, in various communities as the antonym of Schadenfreude. Rather than harm-joy or "pleasure derived from the misfortunes of others". Fribbly is "Joy-Joy" ...
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The meaning of the following lines?

I encountered the following sentence when reading the book "Algebra for young mind": For others, however, mathematics is a daunting subject, whether it takes the form of equations on a whiteboard or ...
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Slang meaning of “pod”

From Seinfeld, season 2 episode 5 ("The Apartment"): JERRY: Let me explain something to you.. You see, you're not normal. You're a great guy, I love you, but you're a pod. I, on the other ...
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What does “zoozi” or “zoozie” mean?

I've heard a phrase in London, it sounded like "It's a big zoozi" or something like that. I wonder what this could mean?
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“Came at [XYZ] life” origin?

What's the origin/etymology of "[ABC] came at [XYZ] life?" The definition according to Urban Dictionary is A phrase that is used in past tense to describe a situation in which another person ...
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What does “do not get (too) vibed that something happened” mean? There is no clue in any dictionary

I stumbled upon this construction: “don’t get (too) vibed”, but I couldn’t get what does it mean. And there is no dictionary that gives an explanation, as far as I can see. “Vibe” is a very special ...
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Is there a proper name for saying something like “stack'em”?

Is there a proper name for saying something like stack'em instead of stack them or any other "'em" in place of "them"? Is it slang or something to do with dialect? UPDATE It is a ...