Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Why does “to dip” mean “to leave”?

So, "dip" has come to mean "leave" in American slang. As in, "Let's dip," i.e. "Let's get out of here." How did that happen? The best I could come up with is: a dip in the road obscures vision, so if ...
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5answers
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How did “snookered” become a slang word for “to cheat or to steal”?

In this question we discussed the etymology of the word "snooker" as a noun, based on a game played on a pool table. But dictionary.com references a form of the word, "snookered" as a slang verb that ...
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1answer
81 views

What is the origin of the expression “do me a solid”?

What is the origin of the phrase "do me a solid"? The definition I am referring to: do me a solid do something for someone as an act of kindness; do someone a favor. Example usage: Hey ...
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1answer
83 views

Non-derrogatory word/phrase analog of “bi**** resting face” but for a young kid

I am not normally someone who uses the word bitch, in fact I dislike it greatly. However, there is the concept out there of "bitchy resting face", for people who have a face that looks unhappy even ...
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1answer
210 views

Colloquial American term for “miliaria”

Often during summers in the tropics, especially under intense heat conditions, we get a skin condition medically referred to as "miliaria." It comprises of reddish rashes with several tiny boil-like ...
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What's the English equivalent for the Italian slang expression “magna magna”

"Magna magna" is a typical Italian slang expression used by common people to give vent to their frustrations and disappointment with politicians when cases of corruption and personal interest in ...
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14answers
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Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?

context: He will surreptitiously introduce a frog into your handbag. You leave your car keys on a desk, he sees it and hides it somewhere. He may offer you M&M type candies that will leave your ...
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13answers
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Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?

Edit - My question doesn't refer to bank loans or credit card accounts. Nor does it refer to getting things out of other people's generosity. It is specifically about money and the putative duplicate ...
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3answers
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When did “Alright?” become a greeting in UK English?

Who remembers when and how "Alright?" became a greeting in UK English? Do you remember the first time you heard it? Can you remember when that was? What was the context? Was there a particular ...
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3answers
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the expression is roughly equivalent to “ Cover your breast over the baby's mouth”

In my own language, the "Cover your breasts over the baby's mouth" is such a lovely and interesting idiom. It's derived from the thing that is: a baby cries very much and the mother is too busy with ...
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22answers
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Is there an idiom or typical expression for an unfunny joke?

Could you tell me some suitable idioms to express this situation: A guy told you a joke, but it's not funny at all. In Japanese, we say "He slipped" or "His joke was so cold that the air got ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the meaning of “Bussin' juugs”?

I've been listening to trap music lately and I came across Gucci Mane's "Bussin' juugs". There is a lot of slang in the lyrics of trap music and given that I'm not a native speaker I didn't understand ...
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2answers
51 views

“I am good!”, different meaning or just sloppy English?

Apparently over the last decades the standard reply to "How are you?" has become: "I'm good." I am not a native speaker but it still sounds bad to me. What is your reaction to that, is it more ...
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1answer
18k views

What does “I want you to do me” mean?

I read a conversation between two people. "I want you to do me on this table." What is the meaning of this sentence?
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2answers
641 views

Origin of “off the meter” idiomatic phrase

When and how did the phrase "off the meter" become established as an idiom? Urban Dictionary defines "off the meter" as the condition of being "very good, awesome, great". I have heard and said it ...
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1answer
34 views

What is the word for offering feedback in an earnest tone that is actually meant to derail?

There is a word for "earnestly" questions and giving suggestions with a hidden agenda to derail and distract from the main argument being made. I've seen it used on twitter before. I think it ...
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1answer
51 views

What does “move his bust around” mean in this context? [closed]

Quite the contrary, actually. Winston Churchill, on the other hand, was terrible to his servants and family, and he was such a well-regarded leader that you can’t even move his bust around now without ...
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3answers
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Why do the words ducky and jake mean fine or satisfactory?

Even the Merriam-Webster dictionary acknowledges both ducky and jake as acceptable terms meaning fine or satisfactory and it dates the word ducky back to 1897 and jake to 1914. Does anyone know how ...
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1answer
29 views

How to spell [kæʃt] in the sense of “expended”

I have Googled but can't even find this word sense in online dictionaries. I've heard the word [kæʃt] used in the sense of "expended", such as in the following examples: My drink is [kæʃt]. (...
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1answer
51 views

Is there a term for this kind of wordplay (rhyming slang)? [duplicate]

Swapping the phonemes of often used phrases while keeping them the same size and structure, for example: Washing the Dishes -> Wishing the Dashes / Dashing the Wishes (or even Flushing the Fishes) ...
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3answers
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Where does the word “wankers” come from?

The term wanker is derived from the verb wank in the sense of to masturbate. However, neither the OED nor Etymonline can trace it further back than that: both claim it is of “obscure origin”, which ...
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3answers
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Is there a definitive spelling for the shortened version of “as per usual”?

A shortened version of the phrase “as per usual” is now used as slang when referring to something that is typical or expected, often in an exaggerated or hyperbolic manner. For example: Bill: ...
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2answers
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it's good for your dime

I was listening to Moonshine a Kill the Vultures tune. I'm not sure about the meaning of: it's good for your dime Does he mean it is cheap? complete sentence: I got moonshine Drink it ...
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3answers
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Why does “Mickey Mouse Operation” refer to a poorly run company?

A phrase I commonly hear (and use myself) when a company (or individual, in some cases) does something that seems foolish or not planned is to ask What kind of Mickey Mouse operation are you ...
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3answers
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“It's a-me !” — just an imitation of an Italian accent or something more?

I've seen and heard this at various times: It's a-me! [first name]! (Most of the time, seemingly as a reference to Mario.) I was wondering what the intent was behind the construction "a-me". Is ...
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2answers
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What is the entomology of “ligger”?

This answer on a prior question points out that ligger is defined by UrbanDictionary as: Ligger An individual who attends parties, openings, social gatherings and events with the sole ...
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2answers
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What is the meaning of “peel” in this passage?

The following passage from Planescape: Torment is when Ghysis the Crooked is describing the different demons that humans may make contracts with. What is the meaning of the word "peel" here? It ...
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0answers
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Is there a slang or a word for “a person who dreams too much, but never ever try for reaching the dreams?” [closed]

I was wondering if there is a word or a slang for the kind of people who are just dreaming and living with their dreams instead of trying to reach them...
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1answer
2k views

Origin and meaning of the American 1960s slang phrase, “bread is”

I am trying to answer a question from a library patron who remembers the entire phrase, "bread is" that she and her friends used in the 1960s. She accepts that "bread" was used for money or "dough," ...
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2answers
224 views

“Everything is up for grabs”

(from an article in The New Yorker about Donald Trump's campaign) Asked by the Associated Press about the possibility of a Trump Presidency, she said, “I don’t want to think about that possibility,...
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1answer
421 views

Are “lb” or “lbs” ever pronounced differently from “pound(s)”?

The “standard” pronunciation of lb or lbs is the same as for pound(s). However, given the nature of humans, I find it likely that in some slang a pronunciation based on the written word is used, e.g....
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How is the sentence “My mama don't like you, but she likes everyone” correct?

I just heard Love yourself by Justin Bieber. I thought I heard "My mama didn't like you but she likes everyone" from the song. Then later I found lyrics on some websites(listed bellow) but it's not ...
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2answers
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Why does “sucker” mean “unexpected” in “Sucker Punch”?

Sucker punch seems to mean "an unexpected punch" in slang. What is the origin of this term and why does sucker mean unexpected in sucker punch?
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1answer
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Meaning and usage of the slang “gold”

I often hear the word gold as a slang to describe something great such as "last night's party was gold" or "that movie was gold" etc. What exactly does gold mean and how do you use the slang?
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1answer
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Etymology of ~Getting into someone's “kitchen”~

Popular in the 80s and early 90s in Black-American culture, but I doubt it made it into many books so we may be at a loss. The meaning, quite visual, is walking into someone's house and banging all ...
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4answers
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Is there an idiom or slang for “When you put all of your efforts on something but it doesn't even meet the minimums”?

I was wondering if there are any idioms for situations when you have tried your best for doing something, but it doesn't even meet the minimums or it's too simple and valueless in comparison with ...
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1answer
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Meaning of 'jiggelin' - word from the song 'Policeman' of Eva Simons

I can't find any definition about this word. Does anybody knows what does it mean? Maybe some kind of drugs? Here are the opening lines of the song in question: Hey, mister policeman I don't ...
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Did British chef Jamie Oliver redefine “pukka” in 1999?

Recently I've been watching cooking programmes: MasterChef Italia (addictive), MasterChef USA (awful), followed swiftly by Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, and then onto Jamie Oliver's acclaimed The ...
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2answers
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What's the origin of this vulgar internet slang term?

The word fuckboy seems to have materialized from the aether somewhat recently and I can't get a grasp on what it's supposed to mean or where it came from. I've heard one suggestion that it originated ...
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1answer
308 views

“Baby blues” - metonymy or synechdoche?

I understand the basic difference between metonymy and synecdoche (thanks in part to this question) but got stumped on "baby blues" as another way of saying eyes. Am I right that it is synecdoche as ...
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1answer
130 views

'Klick' vs. 'Kilometer'

Is it correct to use the word Klick instead of Kilometer in the following sentences? It's about 50 klicks to the next gas station. The US is about 25000 klicks from India by air.
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1answer
47 views

Milk storage freeze or refrigerator? [closed]

I was in some american company and during preparing a coffee I asked some girl with asian face "where is refrigerator?" She got confused and asked me "what do you mean???". I asked with details "where ...
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5answers
557 views

Why is taking a side street called a “rat run”?

I stumbled upon this expression for the first time while doing some research for an answer, and I have to admit I love it! An explanation of rat running/ a rat run is as follows "Rat running/ A ...
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3answers
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Meaning of “get a serious reaming”

As a non-native reader, I stumbled upon the meaning of "get a serious reaming" and it seemed to be an idiomatic expression for being punished. At least the first Google matches seem to suggest this. ...
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How to spell “the youzhe” as in the abbreviation of “the usual”

The usual is a common reply to what will you order? or what are you up to?. It is often abbreviated, in Canada, to the first syllable of usual, as in the youzhe. How would you spell this abbreviation? ...
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1answer
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Things have been crazy busy meaning? [closed]

What is the meaning for this sentence "Things have been crazy busy" ?
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1answer
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“Baby needs a new pair of shoes!”

I'm looking for the origin of this phrase: "Baby needs a new pair of shoes!" (Or "Mama needs a new pair of shoes" or "Daddy needs a new pair of shoes"). You see it in movies and television as a ...
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2answers
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Was “tickle (someone's) fancy” originally a double entendre?

Recently, I asked users to provide modern-day equivalents of idioms and expressions that contained the words fancy and tickle. The question is titled Whatever tickles their fancy in the US? I was ...
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What's exactly I'mma? I'mma go now, I'mma open that for you

When I chat I hear sometimes "I'mma ..." like in: "I'mma go now" or "I'mma open that for you" I am not sure how it's written, I have never got a precise answer when I asked. Should I learn to ...
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1answer
60 views

I have trouble with “puff” and “went full” in this sentence

I am not a native English speaker and I have been studying English by watching dramas. However, I am having trouble with slang and words which are not on dictionaries. From a drama, I don't ...