Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Questions about meanings and usage of “deez nuts”

Please note, I did check the Urban Dictionary, and also Stack Exchange. What is meant in the line @JoeBlow wrote in Term for the embarrassing "three period" thing?: "What can I say but :/ ...
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6answers
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Meaning and usage of “to no end”

What does the phrase mean in "He annoys me to no end"? Literally, does it mean that he annoys me forever? Or does it mean that he annoys me to no result?
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2answers
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proper way to write the slang term for “gravitational force”

I came across something very similar to this in a thriller novel: At this stage, the rocket is experiencing its maximum acceleration, say about ten gees. Here, the author has spelled out the ...
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1answer
75 views

How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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2answers
4k views

What is the etymology of “fanboi”?

In a recent Daring Fireball post, John Gruber wondered about the origin of "fanboi" as a spelling of "fanboy". I tried searching for this, but couldn't find anything definitive. Harry McCracken has ...
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4answers
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Why is 'shucks' (as in 'aw, shucks') used with an '-s' ending?

I understand that 'shucks' is a slang that is: used especially to express mild disappointment or embarrassment and this definition is listed separately from 'shuck' (the verb/noun) in ...
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3answers
543 views

If something is considered the best why is it said to be “the berries”?

According to From Flappers to Rappers: A Study of American Youth Slang by Dr. Thomas Dalzell, "the berries" was a 1920s widely used slang term among American youth to describe something wonderful or ...
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2answers
34 views

'Scenic box'… is it correct?

I would like to use an expression that refers to a theatre space, a stage space, or any space for performing theatre: the space for a 'scene' in general. The expression is 'scenic box'. Is it ...
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20answers
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Which expressions can be used to close an email? [closed]

At the end of written communication like emails and letters, it is customary to use a closing valediction or "complementary close". Which formal and informal expressions can be used to end emails?
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2answers
1k views

Where does the word “*ag” come from?

Once upon a time in America, particularly during the 1970s, if you asked an American whether they ‘fancied a shag’, they might well have thought of this: And therefore declined the offer for fear ...
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2answers
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what is the origin of the slang “jig is up”?

In the novel I'm reading there's the phrase "the gig is up," said to a villian who has just been caught. The form with which I'm familiar is "the jig is up." A gig as in a jazz performance? A jig ...
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1answer
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Term for the embarrassing “three period” thing? [duplicate]

Best. Boyfriend. Ever. I think that was the first of the type, now it's a commonplace. Some deep thinker in the copywriting department at StackOverflow just did it, What can I say but :/ omg deez ...
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5answers
12k views

Why does to “take a powder” mean to run away or to leave?

From Flappers to Rappers: American youth slang by Dr. Thomas Dalzell cites "take a powder" as a 1930s expression meaning to run away or to leave. Does anyone have any ideas why taking a powder would ...
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4answers
1k views

Is there a non-colloquial equivalent term for “cool”?

As I get older (into my 30s) the less I feel like using youthful slang, and I take extra pride in using professional English. But I can't think of a word that is universally equivalent to the ...
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6answers
4k views

Etymology of a “pegged CPU”

There's a slightly obscure, slang meaning in tech circles of the word "pegged" as it relates to a computer's CPU. When it is fully utilised for a duration (at least several seconds), you can say that ...
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3answers
97 views

What do you call a person who has a relationship with a much younger adult?

What do I call someone who marries or has a sexual relationship with someone much younger than themselves? Their partner is someone who is at least 18 years old. The term paedophile is not the ...
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3answers
2k views

Explanation for “them's”

Recently someone said to me: Them's the rules I thought he had the sentence wrong, but as it turns out it is slang. I am learning English as a second language and I would really appreciate if ...
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2answers
1k views

Come on, don’t be such a nimrod!

According to the OED, the word English Nimrod is derived from the Hebrew, where in Genesis 10:8–9 he is described as ‘a mighty one in the earth’ and ‘a mighty hunter before the Lord’. It is ...
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2answers
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Why does 'pine feather period' signify the period in a woman's life when she blossoms?

A book titled Flappers 2 Rappers lists youth slang from the 1920s, and one of the terms it lists is "pine feather period." "Pine feather period" is defined as a period in a woman's life when she ...
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3answers
7k views

How did the words “petting” and “necking” come to mean kissing with passion?

I'm sure most of you have heard "necking" to mean kissing with passion; however, before "necking" the popular word among American youth was "petting". From Flappers to Rappers: The Study of American ...
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7answers
5k views

Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?

Searching Google for the history of the slang term "the bomb" (as in "That song is the bomb") yields a number of results in 40s/50s jazz glossaries, but they tend to at best give an artificial example ...
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3answers
2k views

How old is the word “prolly”?

Prolly is given this definition at Wiktionary: Clipped pronunciation of probably. I was reading an interesting article today that claimed prolly dates from 1947 and that surprised me. ...
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5answers
4k views

How did the slang meaning of “flog” come about?

I've searched multiple dictionaries and Etymonline but the only origin for "flog" that I can find is: 1670s, slang, perhaps a schoolboy shortening of L. flagellare "flagellate." This clearly ...
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3answers
290 views

Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word?

Usage: "I would not like to eat that pie as it looks all festy since you dropped it on the ground." Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word? Also, is it used elsewhere in the world? ...
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1answer
67 views

classy sassy and a bit smart assy [closed]

classy sassy and a bit smart assy Can someone please explain the meaning of this?
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3answers
61 views

Colloquial meaning of a hashtag

Despite its primarily functional origins, the hash tag has broken out of its social media context and is a kind of colloquialism, usually intended as a joke, but utilized in just about any form of ...
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1answer
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number one and number two as euphemisms for urinate/defecate. rationale for which is which?

After years of never knowing which is which, I finally looked it up and it seems number one is firmly taking a pee, while number two is taking a poo. This seems quite arbitrary so I am wondering the ...
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0answers
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Is “Am” instead of “I am” proper slang? [duplicate]

I tried to coax google into finding results for "am not preceded by I", but failed. Now my question is: Is saying "Am" instead of "I am" valid slang? Examples: Am a God. Obey. Am driving. Can't ...
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5answers
1k views

Meaning of “being sold as a silver-bullet”

I was reading an article about software developers and read that something is being sold as a silver-bullet. What does it mean?
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0answers
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“Shut my mouth wide open!”

"What is origin of the expression "Shut my mouth wide open."? Google search for the phrase produced nothing of interest.
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2answers
3k views

What is the origin of “breaking bad”?

Wiktionary gives the meaning of "break bad" but does not mention about the origin: 1. (colloquial, of an event or of one's fortunes) To go wrong; to go downhill. 2. (colloquial, chiefly ...
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3answers
3k views

What does “throw back” mean?

In this sentence: I've throw back a lot of orange juice. What does to “throw back (orange juice)” mean?
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4answers
5k views

Where did the word 'golliwog' come from?

I am aware that the term is considered offensive. And I know that it refers to soft faced black dolls. But before that character was introduced, did 'golliwog' have meaning? I mean was it made up, or ...
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5answers
4k views

The origin of the term half assed

Does this slang originate from half asked, since the difinition means exactly that. You only did half what I asked you.
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7answers
385 views

Adjective for someone who is an a-hole?

I'm trying to identify an effective adjective for someone who is unpleasant to others, mean spirited, and self-centered enough to qualify as a colloquial "a$$hole". I've looked at this question, ...
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3answers
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How rude is “dude” in online writing?

In online writing, such as on StackExchange sites, using the word "dude" is most likely unnecessary (it's obvious to whom a comment is addressed, and there are @mentions). What connotation does "dude" ...
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2answers
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In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?

It is clear from this site that the verb to trump has been used extensively across Britain to refer to the breaking of wind. It is especially the case in the North, in Wales and certainly in Norfolk, ...
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2answers
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Does “painted lady” sometimes mean prostitute?

Does "painted lady" or "painted ladies" sometimes mean prostitute(s), who used to heavily use make-up? I have a suspicion that even Shakespeare did so, but can't find anything indicating it. Urban ...
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2answers
67 views

Etymology of “horny”

What is the etymology of "horny"? It isn't related to rhino horn, because rhino horn isn't used as an aphrodisiac in traditional Chinese medicine. Wiktionary doesn't have any etymology info The ...
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2answers
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What is a word that describes when someone requires a certain quality of another person in order for them to be a possible dating option?

This has been bugging me for the past 30 minutes. It's basically some sort of specific criteria you hold in order to even consider dating someone, like "My girlfriend has to like Star Wars," or "My ...
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3answers
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In Gary Bernhardt's talk about Ruby and JavaScript surprises, what does “wat” mean?

There's a video of a conference presentation by Gary Bernhardt about surprising behavior in the Ruby and JavaScript computer programming languages. At the beginning of the video, Seth asks the ...
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4answers
2k views

What do you call someone who knows multiple programming languages?

Someone who knows multiple languages is called polyglot or multilingual (There can be nuances between two words also.). I'm not sure if we can apply these terms to someone who knows multiple ...
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1answer
52 views

Where did the phrase, “You did a bean,” come from?

I grew up in Texas in the 60s. My dad grew up in Waco and moved to New Jersey during World War II. He contributed may German phrases to our lives. My mom was born in central Texas, but her dad was ...
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4answers
117 views

Word for a particular “weird-looking” pose in a photograph?

By weird-looking I mean something like this, a facial expression that people often use when being photographed: I checked Thesaurus, but the words--freaky, funky, kooky--don't seem to have the ...
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1answer
98 views

“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
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1answer
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How to understand “cat's evening wear”?

I really had a difficult time to understand this. It comes from a book I am reading, and it is used to describe a concept the author speaks highly of. Does it mean that something is very special? Or ...
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1answer
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Is 'dicing' a verb in dice games?

When you're playing Yahtzee or any other dice game, is it correct to use the verb "dicing" when you want to notify whoever is listening? Or is "dicing" a slang word ? Or is it neither? Could it be my ...
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11answers
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What does “from hunger” mean?

What is the meaning of the phrase "from hunger", as in, "This xyz is from hunger"? From the context I found it in, it appears to mean either very good, or very bad, but it's hard to tell which. The ...
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1answer
824 views

What's the meaning of 'haler'? [correction: hailer] [closed]

This doesn't seem to be general reference, because in the context I've seen it used tonight (the London riots), it certainly isn't referring to a coin, or 'a person who hails'. I've heard it used ...
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1answer
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Phonetically, “lanapeel,” what is this word? (marine animal)

My fiancée, who speaks what might best be described as a “distinctly rural” dialect of American English (she sounds like she grew up near Larry the Cable Guy), has related stories to me of a marine ...