Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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1answer
69 views

How to understand “cat's evening wear”?

I really had a difficult time to understand this. It comes from a book I am reading, and it is used to describe a concept the author speaks highly of. Does it mean that something is very special? Or ...
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1answer
85 views

Is 'dicing' a verb in dice games?

When you're playing Yahtzee or any other dice game, is it correct to use the verb "dicing" when you want to notify whoever is listening? Or is "dicing" a slang word ? Or is it neither? Could it be my ...
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11answers
5k views

What does “from hunger” mean?

What is the meaning of the phrase "from hunger", as in, "This xyz is from hunger"? From the context I found it in, it appears to mean either very good, or very bad, but it's hard to tell which. The ...
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1answer
802 views

What's the meaning of 'haler'? [correction: hailer] [closed]

This doesn't seem to be general reference, because in the context I've seen it used tonight (the London riots), it certainly isn't referring to a coin, or 'a person who hails'. I've heard it used ...
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1answer
141 views

Phonetically, “lanapeel,” what is this word? (marine animal)

My fiancée, who speaks what might best be described as a “distinctly rural” dialect of American English (she sounds like she grew up near Larry the Cable Guy), has related stories to me of a marine ...
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3answers
228 views

What is the meaning of “cop” in: “if London cops it, he'll cop it”?

What is the meaning of the text in bold: He says if London cops it, he'll cop it. And not to worry, Dad. I have found these meanings for cop in The Free Dictionary, but none of them seem ...
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2answers
32 views

what is the origin of the slang “jig is up”?

In the novel I'm reading there's the phrase "the gig is up," said to a villian who has just been caught. The form with which I'm familiar is "the jig is up." A gig as in a jazz performance? A jig ...
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1answer
59 views

A true proven origin of “copy that” [duplicate]

I always thought that "I copy that" was derived from an Italian "capisci" (capire = understand), but today I've read that this may be a radio slang only, not being derived from any other phrase. What ...
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2answers
46 views

Does “technie” mean “technical guy”?

I remembered that I read somewhere the word "technie" which means "technical guy". However, I could not see that definition on the internet. Seem like "technie" is a slang. So, Does "technie" mean ...
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2answers
41 views

When did “Whatever.” begin to be used as a sentence?

"Whatever." is often used in slang as if it were a complete sentence, vaguely conveying meanings such as "I don't care" or "I'm not going to challenge what you say, but I'm not necessarily going to ...
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2answers
225 views

What does “cooks crystal” mean?

Jack Reaper: So he works here? Sandy: Ya. It's bullshit though. He cooks crystal. I saw this conversation in the movie called Jack Reaper. What does "cooks crystal" mean? From the context it ...
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1answer
28 views

show ownership of mom [closed]

My step daughter constantly while at my home says momma said.. while referring to her mother which is not me.. should she show ownership of momma while around people who do not share the same mother ...
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4answers
2k views

Why doesn't it go like “him and his wife”?

Please take a look at this excerpt from The Catcher in the Rye: I think I probably woke he and his wife up, because it took them a helluva long time to answer the phone. This phrase confused me. ...
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2answers
485 views

Origin of “to be into [someone] for [a sum of money]”

"He's into me for fifty quid" means "He owes me fifty pounds". It's common enough in the UK, but I'm fairly sure I've heard it in American movies too (bucks or grand there, not quid, obviously), so I ...
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5answers
934 views

Why do the British refer to things as 'posh'

Why do the British refer to something very smart, or people who are very well-off as being 'posh'?
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6answers
2k views

What's the origin and popularity of the word “boss” in the context of refering to the person you're talking with?

In a video game called "Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines", a character called "Gorgeous Gary Golden", always refers to the player as "boss". Here are some examples from that first dialog: ...
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3answers
5k views

Where does the word “wankers” come from?

The term wanker is derived from the verb wank in the sense of to masturbate. However, neither the OED nor Etymonline can trace it further back than that: both claim it is of “obscure origin”, which ...
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7answers
5k views

Etymology of “div”

Acting like a div yesterday:- a stupid or foolish person I started to wonder how this term of abuse came about. Urban Dictionary has a quaint tale:- Actually originates from prison slang in ...
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2answers
53 views

Slang word 'BEOCH' pronunciation

I managed to find on Internet the meaning of the word BEOCH which equals BITCH. But how is it pronounced left me wondering ! Could someone help me with, please .
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5answers
3k views

Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?

Did they say "hand job" in the 1800s? I was watching an episode of Deadwood, and they just said it. For example, from episode 6 "Plague": (Al enters the back room, Dolly is scrunched up on the ...
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5answers
13k views

“Screwed” vs. “nailed”: why is the slang so different?

While the two names nail and screw have similar shapes and functions, why do the verbs differ so much? Someone has screwed something sounds like they have ruined something to me, while someone has ...
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5answers
6k views

What does “what for” mean and where did it come from?"

There is a fight scene in one of my favorite movies in which the main character says "Give them what for!" I've hear this term many times before (usually from old south-eastern Americans,) but no ...
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4answers
11k views

Is “embiggen” considered a formal or slang word?

If my memory serves me correctly, I first encountered the word embiggen a year or so ago. I thought it seemed odd, but in context, the meaning was quite obvious. Since that time I've seen this word ...
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1answer
62 views

Goose or Chilly Bumps or Pimples?

I've heard many people use the term "goose bumps"; in my family, they were "goose pimples," but I don't know if this was peculiar to us, or if others also use it. My wife's family's saying for this ...
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1answer
146 views

Nailed, screwed, and hammered in one sentence

"Can someone be so "screwed" because someone "nailed" an argument that made him "hammered"? Is my sentence correct? Can we use those three slangs in one sentence? I understand that these slangs have ...
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3answers
2k views

Old timers referring to a “bad penny”

What is the source and meaning of "turning up like a bad penny?"
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2answers
86 views

What is a word that describes when someone requires a certain quality of another person in order for them to be a possible dating option?

This has been bugging me for the past 30 minutes. It's basically some sort of specific criteria you hold in order to even consider dating someone, like "My girlfriend has to like Star Wars," or "My ...
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10answers
11k views

Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”

If someone has the wrong end of the stick it means they've misunderstood something. If they've got the shitty end of the stick it means they've got a bad deal in some bargain or share-out. This ...
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2answers
105 views

Non standard english: Slang. “That sucks man.” [closed]

Where does the term 'That sucks!' and putting 'man' on the end of sentences come from? "aw that sucks, man!" Thanks!
2
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1answer
95 views

“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
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3answers
568 views

What does “Sp 12” mean?

I been listening to Playaz Club by Rappin 4-Tay. In the lyrics at one point he mentions this: I got a hoe named Real de Real She got a buddy named SP 12, now, you know the deal We getz freaky in ...
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2answers
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What is the etymology of “fanboi”?

In a recent Daring Fireball post, John Gruber wondered about the origin of "fanboi" as a spelling of "fanboy". I tried searching for this, but couldn't find anything definitive. Harry McCracken has ...
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3answers
3k views

'Ours' meaning 'our home' - where is it used outside the UK, if anywhere?

In expressions like: Let's go back to ours and have some food. There's a party at ours on Friday. There's a bottle of brandy at yours, isn't there? 'ours' and 'yours' are synonyms for ...
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1answer
95 views

Is there an idiom or slang word for “the last round of beer”?

I'm looking for a word or phrase that would fit here, where a few guys are drinking at a pub. A. "I must be going now." B. "Hey, wait, let's have ..............." which would mean a final drink ...
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3answers
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Where do “shenanigans” come from?

Shenanigans, or shenanigan, also with several variant spellings, can be dated to 1855 USA in both the OED and Etymonline, but the OED simply says "Origin obscure" and Etymonline throws a few guesses ...
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0answers
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What is the precise meaning of “f***” in the context of the hip hop mantra, “F*** bitches, get money”? [closed]

I've been hearing the line "Fuck bitches / Get money" in hip hop songs recently. I mostly noticed it lately in a couple of notable songs by Lil Wayne and other Young Money affiliated artists, but ...
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2answers
28k views

Are “way better” and “way more” correct?

"Way better" and "way more" are popular expressions, but they both seem incorrect to me. "Far better", "far more", "much better", and "much more" all seem correct. Is this true? If so, why?
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4answers
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How did the slang meaning of “flog” come about?

I've searched multiple dictionaries and Etymonline but the only origin for "flog" that I can find is: 1670s, slang, perhaps a schoolboy shortening of L. flagellare "flagellate." This clearly ...
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3answers
87 views

Which is more appropriate: “I gonna” or “I am gonna”? [closed]

I want to ask about verb "to be" in gonna, specifically about which form is more accurate. I am gonna or I gonna and They gonna or They are gonna
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1answer
64 views

What is a name someone would describe a false homophobe? [closed]

What would you call a person who calls another person a "faggot" in a very hateful way, when this other person is not a homosexual.
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4answers
8k views

First use of the slang term “Scrub”?

The slang term "scrub", when referred to a person, can mean several things. It seems like the original usage as an adjective is someone who is not good at something - video games, sports, etc. I am ...
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6answers
291 views

English equivalent of two popular Chinese slangs: 学霸 (academic overlord) and 学婊 (academic bitch)

In popular Chinese language, especially in Internet Chinese language, we use the word "学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who ...
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8answers
1k views

A polite substitution for “lamer”

Is there a polite word that can be used to designate someone who didn't really understand what he or she was doing? Or, in general, someone who is intentionally ignorant of how things work. A "lamer" ...
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4answers
128 views

Word for a owing a free pass on withholding judgment

The word is on the tip of my tongue and I'm pretty sure it ends with "ie or y." The idea is a friend had a gracious attitude when I did something stupid, so now I want to return the favor. So I want ...
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2answers
2k views

Photo creds or photo cred?

A lot of people nowadays use the phrase "photo creds" eg: Here's an awesome photo of me! Photo creds to John! Creds usually means credit or credits. But then you get the sentences: Photo ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the origin of “have a gander”? (When meaning “look”.)

The phrase "have a gander" meaning "have a look" is common in the UK. (Also can be "have a goosey gander" or just "have a goosey".) What is the origin/meaning of this phrase? I always assumed that it ...
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7answers
3k views

Is the term “you suck” always considered slang? [closed]

I'm having a serious argument with a friend on the status of the word "suck" when I used it about him by saying "You suck!" because he missed a train. We are both non-native English speakers. He ...
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3answers
1k views

Single word for “Where are you guys?”

What slang expressions can I use to express "Where are you guys?" in a single word? I am looking for a very short, informal phrase or a single word I could use to ask this question that would still be ...
0
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1answer
113 views

What do you call people who like word puzzles?

What is the term for, or the name for, a person who enjoys solving word puzzles, crosswords, etc.?