Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Old timers referring to a “bad penny”

What is the source and meaning of "turning up like a bad penny?"
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What does “what for” mean and where did it come from?"

There is a fight scene in one of my favorite movies in which the main character says "Give them what for!" I've hear this term many times before (usually from old south-eastern Americans,) but no ...
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What is a word that describes when someone requires a certain quality of another person in order for them to be a possible dating option?

This has been bugging me for the past 30 minutes. It's basically some sort of specific criteria you hold in order to even consider dating someone, like "My girlfriend has to like Star Wars," or "My ...
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Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”

If someone has the wrong end of the stick it means they've misunderstood something. If they've got the shitty end of the stick it means they've got a bad deal in some bargain or share-out. This ...
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Non standard english: Slang. “That sucks man.” [on hold]

Where does the term 'That sucks!' and putting 'man' on the end of sentences come from? "aw that sucks, man!" Thanks!
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1answer
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“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
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What does “Sp 12” mean?

I been listening to Playaz Club by Rappin 4-Tay. In the lyrics at one point he mentions this: I got a hoe named Real de Real She got a buddy named SP 12, now, you know the deal We getz freaky in ...
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1answer
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Is 'dicing' a verb in dice games?

When you're playing Yahtzee or any other dice game, is it correct to use the verb "dicing" when you want to notify whoever is listening? Or is "dicing" a slang word ? Or is it neither? Could it be my ...
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What is the etymology of “fanboi”?

In a recent Daring Fireball post, John Gruber wondered about the origin of "fanboi" as a spelling of "fanboy". I tried searching for this, but couldn't find anything definitive. Harry McCracken has ...
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'Ours' meaning 'our home' - where is it used outside the UK, if anywhere?

In expressions like: Let's go back to ours and have some food. There's a party at ours on Friday. There's a bottle of brandy at yours, isn't there? 'ours' and 'yours' are synonyms for ...
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1answer
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Is there an idiom or slang word for “the last round of beer”?

I'm looking for a word or phrase that would fit here, where a few guys are drinking at a pub. A. "I must be going now." B. "Hey, wait, let's have ..............." which would mean a final drink ...
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Where do “shenanigans” come from?

Shenanigans, or shenanigan, also with several variant spellings, can be dated to 1855 USA in both the OED and Etymonline, but the OED simply says "Origin obscure" and Etymonline throws a few guesses ...
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What is the precise meaning of “f***” in the context of the hip hop mantra, “F*** bitches, get money”? [closed]

I've been hearing the line "Fuck bitches / Get money" in hip hop songs recently. I mostly noticed it lately in a couple of notable songs by Lil Wayne and other Young Money affiliated artists, but ...
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2answers
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Are “way better” and “way more” correct?

"Way better" and "way more" are popular expressions, but they both seem incorrect to me. "Far better", "far more", "much better", and "much more" all seem correct. Is this true? If so, why?
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Etymology of “div”

Acting like a div yesterday:- a stupid or foolish person I started to wonder how this term of abuse came about. Urban Dictionary has a quaint tale:- Actually originates from prison slang in ...
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How did the slang meaning of “flog” come about?

I've searched multiple dictionaries and Etymonline but the only origin for "flog" that I can find is: 1670s, slang, perhaps a schoolboy shortening of L. flagellare "flagellate." This clearly ...
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Which is more appropriate: “I gonna” or “I am gonna”? [closed]

I want to ask about verb "to be" in gonna, specifically about which form is more accurate. I am gonna or I gonna and They gonna or They are gonna
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What is a name someone would describe a false homophobe? [closed]

What would you call a person who calls another person a "faggot" in a very hateful way, when this other person is not a homosexual.
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First use of the slang term “Scrub”?

The slang term "scrub", when referred to a person, can mean several things. It seems like the original usage as an adjective is someone who is not good at something - video games, sports, etc. I am ...
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English equivalent of two popular Chinese slangs: 学霸 (academic overlord) and 学婊 (academic bitch)

In popular Chinese language, especially in Internet Chinese language, we use the word "学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who ...
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A polite substitution for “lamer”

Is there a polite word that can be used to designate someone who didn't really understand what he or she was doing? Or, in general, someone who is intentionally ignorant of how things work. A "lamer" ...
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Word for a owing a free pass on withholding judgment

The word is on the tip of my tongue and I'm pretty sure it ends with "ie or y." The idea is a friend had a gracious attitude when I did something stupid, so now I want to return the favor. So I want ...
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Photo creds or photo cred?

A lot of people nowadays use the phrase "photo creds" eg: Here's an awesome photo of me! Photo creds to John! Creds usually means credit or credits. But then you get the sentences: Photo ...
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What is the origin of “have a gander”? (When meaning “look”.)

The phrase "have a gander" meaning "have a look" is common in the UK. (Also can be "have a goosey gander" or just "have a goosey".) What is the origin/meaning of this phrase? I always assumed that it ...
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Is the term “you suck” always considered slang? [closed]

I'm having a serious argument with a friend on the status of the word "suck" when I used it about him by saying "You suck!" because he missed a train. We are both non-native English speakers. He ...
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Single word for “Where are you guys?”

What slang expressions can I use to express "Where are you guys?" in a single word? I am looking for a very short, informal phrase or a single word I could use to ask this question that would still be ...
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1answer
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What do you call people who like word puzzles?

What is the term for, or the name for, a person who enjoys solving word puzzles, crosswords, etc.?
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1answer
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What does 'Flipperhead' mean?

Seen this in a few movies, spelling is probably incorrect. It appears to be an irish-american slang for an idiot in usage. Mostly interested in the correct spelling/actual word(s) and origin. The ...
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A term for products whose “secret” features are well-known (but not publicized)

What do you call those household items whose selling features are purportedly practical, functional and ‘innocent’ but instead are often bought for completely different, and sometimes ‘naughty’ ...
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Origin of “toffee-nosed”

What's the origin of toffee-nosed (snobbish, disdainful, stuck-up)? Is it related to "toff" (upper-class)?
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Colloquial American term for “miliaria”

Often during summers in the tropics, especially under intense heat conditions, we get a skin condition medically referred to as "miliaria." It comprises of reddish rashes with several tiny boil-like ...
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What does “do not get (too) vibed that something happened” mean? There is no clue in any dictionary

I stumbled upon this construction: “don’t get (too) vibed”, but I couldn’t get what does it mean. And there is no dictionary that gives an explanation, as far as I can see. “Vibe” is a very special ...
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What is the origin of the phrase “hot take”?

I've been seeing this phrase pop up more and more in social media. I wasn't sure of what it meant, so of course I googled it: http://www.vox.com/2014/12/29/7417055/best-worst-words-2014 ...
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Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back? [duplicate]

My question doesn't refer to bank loans or credit card accounts. Nor does it refer to getting things out of other people's generosity. It is specifically about money; a slang word or idiom for a ...
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Is there a derogatory word for “mobile phone” (cellphone) similar to “idiot box” for a television?

My father called our TV "the idiot box". Implying either that it had idiots on it, was targeted at idiots, or you were an idiot if you watched it too much. Is there any similar term in use but ...
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Connotations of using “boy” by upper-class liberal Britons in beginning of 20th century

Could someone provide (ideally documented) evidence for the following details of the possible meanings/connotations of the word "boy" as used by a start-of-20th-century upper-class British person of ...
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Yikes! Where did it come from?

(humorous, slang) Expressing fear. (humorous, slang) Expressing empathy with unpleasant or undesirable circumstances. [Wiktionary] Yikes! Where did it come from? OED says "Origin ...
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Term for words like “Hanky-Panky” [duplicate]

Is there a name for these kind of doubled words? For example: hanky-panky flim-flam hoity-toity boo-hoo zig-zag Note that some rhyme and others do not.
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Priscilla = a girl who prefers to stay home: who might this term have been based on?

From Flappers to Rappers, a book of American youth slang, records "Priscilla" as a 1920s slang word for a girl who prefers to stay home. I'm curious to know why the author chose that name. Is there a ...
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Origin of “for the birds” (Trivial; worthless; only of interest to gullible people.)

I really have looked, but the best I can come up with is this To say that something is "for the birds" is to call it horse manure. Dating from the days of horse-drawn traffic, the expression is ...
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4answers
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Meaning and usage of “to no end”

What does the phrase "He annoys me to no end" mean? Literally, does it mean that he annoys me forever? Or does it mean that he annoys me to no result?
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Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?

Did they say "hand job" in the 1800s? I was watching an episode of Deadwood, and they just said it. For example, from episode 6 "Plague": (Al enters the back room, Dolly is scrunched up on the ...
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What does “fleek” mean and when was it first used?

The word fleek is all over Twitter. The @lovihatibot Twitterbot routinely finds it in searches for "I love the word [X]" and "I hate the word [X]", in fact it's the third most hated word over the ...
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Where did the slang usages of “cool” come from?

I see and hear two general slang usages of cool - one meaning great (illustrated by a and b below), and one meaning acceptable/okay (illustrated by c and d). The following are Dictionary.com's four ...
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Did the English call a fruit “openærs” for 700 years?

There is a small apple-tasting fruit called medlar in English. It looks like a cross between an apple and a rosehip. It has two main curious features: first the fruit must be bletted before it can ...
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What does Mitt Romney’s “yams” mean?

There was the following passage in Vanity Fair's (May 16) article titled, "Mitt “Bird Legs” Romney is ready for his boxing match.”: Romney also revealed two nicknames. As a high-schooler, he was ...
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Origin of “deez nuts”

I really hate to ask this one, but... When I was a child, some thirty plus years ago, there was a popular juvenile game where you would try to trick a friend into asking a question that could be ...
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“Dance it out” or “dance it off”? [closed]

If the one wanted to, for example, dance to forget about problems/to unload, should we colloquially say 'dance it off' or 'dance it out'?
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Can I use 'slew' in a formal essay? [closed]

In a formal essay, can the phrase He had a slew of mental and physical illnesses be used?