Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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“bucking for” .. like Klinger

In the culturally referrent 1970s USA TV show "MASH", about the Korean war, character Corporal Klinger acts "crazy", specifically wearing female clothing, ... because he is bucking for a section 8 ...
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4answers
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Why is a black eye called a “shiner”?

I saw a photograph of Chris Robshaw, the Harlequins captain, in the paper yesterday sporting a magnificent shiner, and naturally started to wonder where the term originated. Consulting Etymonline ...
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1answer
31 views

Meaning of 'The Pits of Fashion'

In the musical Hamilton, Jefferson states of Hamilton: I get no satisfaction witnessing his fits of passion, The way he primps and preens and dresses like the pits of fashion Which I would think ...
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2answers
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Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?

(I think this "blank" moment of mine is what is called in AmEng a brain fart, so be it) Isn't ‘a gonner/gonna’ slang for a person who is about to die? It's said in situations where, potentially, ...
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3answers
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Why is 'shucks' (as in 'aw, shucks') used with an '-s' ending?

I understand that 'shucks' is a slang that is: used especially to express mild disappointment or embarrassment and this definition is listed separately from 'shuck' (the verb/noun) in ...
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7answers
378 views

What is a less vulgar, but informal phrase for “talk a lot of s***”? [closed]

For some reason the phrase "talk a lot of stick" is coming into my mind when I think of a person who talks a lot of shit, but I couldn't find anything when I Googled it. Is there any phrase which ...
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0answers
80 views

Does “mouse” in the computer sense come from nautical slang?

Computer "mouse" is an English term known and used worldwide. Reference about its origin appears to suggest that the term, which obviously refers to the shape of a small mouse, may actually come ...
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It's not proper.. no such thing as “unseeming(ing)ly”? [closed]

I'll keep it simple, as I've learned - the hard way - that schtick does NOT go over well, around here. So.... unseemly |ˌənˈsēmlē| adj. (of behavior or actions) not proper or appropriate: an ...
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6answers
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“Fixing to” at the beginning of a sentence

Use of fixing to at the beginning of a sentence is prevalent in the southern states of Amerca. Is this the right usage? And is this only a southern US thing? Examples: Fixing to call her. ...
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5answers
396 views

Slang or idiom for submissive

Is there an idiomatic or slang word meaning a submissive person who does everything others order him to do and never complains even when they should, and is ,in a sense, controlled by someone else.
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4answers
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a word for functionalism as decoration

a word for an element of a design, or an object, that appears overtly functional but is decorative. ie, 4x4 rugged styling that is not functional; plastic bull bars. Lots of buckles or oversized, ...
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2answers
1k views

Would the slang version, yessir, of yes, sir, be deemed as derogatory, offensive, or simply disrespectful to someone your senior?

I use yessir as a slang form of yes, sir all the time. Is it even a word? Would the slang version, yessir, be deemed as derogatory, offensive, or simply disrespectful to someone your senior?
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1answer
93 views

Colloquial use of “to dip”

So, "dip" has come to mean "leave" in American slang. As in, "Let's dip," i.e. "Let's get out of here." How did that happen? The best I could come up with is: a dip in the road obscures vision, so if ...
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1answer
140 views

What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
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7answers
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Definition of “kissing cousins”— Are the dictionaries wrong/incomplete?

With relatives in the US south, I always thought that the definition of "kissing cousin" was a second cousin (or more distant) whom you could kiss and subsequently marry (FWIW I never did either!). ...
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2answers
107 views

“Nice shoes …” What does that phrase actually mean? [closed]

As from the title. I've been receiving this from a security guard, when attending a developer conference, well, a bit overdressed (wearing a suit where all the other nerds just appeared in t-shirt, ...
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3answers
2k views

What's the origin of “lit”?

Since June 2015, use of the word lit has exploded on Twitter. Here's some recent examples. Nena Marie: My Year is starting off lit af👌🏼 ...but is gonna be TD by Monday morning Nick: Jason ...
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5answers
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Meaning of “to get stuffed”

What does the phrase to get stuffed mean in the following passage taken from my IELTS reading exercise? One of London Zoo’s recent advertisements caused me some irritation, so patently did it ...
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2answers
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Why do people use the term “six figure sum” to mean “at least one million dollars”? [duplicate]

In Australia at least, a "six figure sum" is synonymous with an amount over $1,000,000. The last time I checked, 1000000 had seven digits in it. To quote a recent article in Melbourne's highest ...
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3answers
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Origin and variants of phrase: “let's blow this popsicle stand”

I'd like to know the origin and precursor or derivative variants of the phrase "let's blow this popsicle stand". Reliable, conclusive, source-supported, authoritative and consistent information about ...
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5answers
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Get a life | You have no life

I saw this as a mild insult on the Internet, one person tells another: "get a life" or "you have no life". What does it mean literally and what is its meaning as an insult?
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1answer
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word for a condescending, snarky, yet awkward and jealous, person

i'm looking for a word for a person who is cynical, judgmental, nitpicking, condescending but also flawed, gawky and timid (in an unfamiliar setting), and is harboring some kind of jealousy towards ...
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9answers
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Is there a less colloquial word (noun or adjective) to describe an “attention whore”?

It could be a noun or an adjective, and either could describe a person or an action. For example: "Did you hear Eric's wedding toast? He wouldn't shut up!" "I know, he was being a complete _______"
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3answers
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How commonly does “done” replace “did”?

How common is it for native English speakers to actively replace the past tense 'did' with the past participle 'done'? I used to think it was only really done in rather vulgar dialects, but I have ...
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1answer
99 views

Holy holy=Holy s###?

I thought I heard the store manager (a native English speaker, mid-20's) muttered to himself like "Holy holy." That was when the store was newly opened and was so crowded with lots of customers. He ...
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3answers
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What does it mean when someone calls himself “non sequitur”? [closed]

Coming from my answer to question Is there a better noun form of “unreasonable” than “unreasonableness?” What does it mean when someone calls himself "non sequitur"? Examples: "I AM NON ...
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1answer
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Etymology of “Buff” and “Nerf” as used in video-game slang

In video games, when the makers increase the power of something, it is sometimes referred to as a buff. If they decrease the power of something, it is called a nerf or a de-buff. This also applies ...
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3answers
241 views

What do you call tiny underdeveloped segments of an orange?

Sometimes after peeling your orange, you notice that there are also some underdeveloped segments inside it (figure 1), or at its base (figure 2). What do you call these tiny, underdeveloped ...
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3answers
2k views

Word or expression for guys who slept with the same woman(prostitute)?

Embarrassingly, in Korean, there is a slang word for this kind of relationship between guys. Might be translated as, "the husband of my wife's sister but only by the hole" ? I don't know how can I ...
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0answers
43 views

“The sketched one” [migrated]

I'm new in the English world. This is my questions: can I say the sentence "the sketched one" to indicate a draft version of a work? Is it correct in english?
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Did British chef Jamie Oliver redefine “pukka” in 1999?

Recently I've been watching cooking programmes: MasterChef Italia (addictive), MasterChef USA (awful), followed swiftly by Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, and then onto Jamie Oliver's acclaimed The ...
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5answers
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J. Oliver's usage of the word 'bog'

I have a question about the usage of the word 'bog' in the following sentence: Bog standard scoops of ice cream etc I understand that the meaning is 'form'; nevertheless, this is the first time ...
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5answers
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what is the slang word for rich but uneducated people? especially those who live in rural areas and who like to show off?

What is the slang word for rich but uneducated people, especially those who live in rural areas and always like to show off?
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2answers
109 views

Where does the word 'Simoleon' come from?

Simoleon is another word for money. si·mo·le·on /səˈmōlēən/ I once thought that the word Simoleon came from the popular PC game The Sims. However, recently I heard the word used in ...
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11answers
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Is “Yankee” derogatory?

I have heard of the term "Yankee" often referring to people in the Northern U.S. by Southerners. My question is: is this term considered derogatory or offensive and should it be avoided in workplace ...
5
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1answer
163 views

Proper spelling of variant of “suspicious”

I'm not sure if it's an Aussie thing, but if something is suspicious, then it's sus(s), e.g: Someone added me on Facebook but they don't have a profile picture. I think they're a bit sus(s). The ...
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4answers
2k views

Warmth of a seat that has been vacated by a person who was sitting on it

I fail to recall this word (could be informal in nature) that refers to the 'warmth of a seat that has just been vacated by someone seated on it for some time'. Anyone?
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4answers
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Origin of the word “spraunce”

I was recently talking to someone who said a restaurant was spraunce, meaning it was well-presented and high-quality (that being the sense I was familiar with). We briefly discussed the fact that he ...
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5answers
7k views

“I'm on the brew”

A conversation between two Scots: — What do you do for a living? — I'm on the brew. Assuming that I have the phrase right, what exactly does "on the brew" mean here? Based on the context, I ...
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947 views

“Oojakapiv”: what does this word mean?

A lot of people in my family use this word, not regularly, but enough for me to ask what it means. I know it’s not a “real word”, but how come people from different sides of my family use it? It must ...
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3answers
2k views

Anyroad and Anyway

As far as I know, anyway is a common word used by both American and British English speakers to mean in any case, nevertheless, etc. I never thought much about the word until I noticed that British ...
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1answer
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I don't understande the usage of “either” in this sentence

"I couldn't sleep last night. I bet you guys couldn't either". Does the second sentence mean "I bet you too, guys"? Is it correct to use "either" like that or is it just slang?
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4answers
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What does “our project has gone to Kan” mean? [closed]

I heard the expression, "our project has gone to Kan", and I thought it has gone to a new location. I was thinking, is there a location called "Kan" or "Can", or is it a short form for Canada? But ...
4
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2answers
168 views

Is there “BFU” acronym meaning 'Stupid Average User' (expressively) in English IT slang?

Have you ever encountered given initialism denoting 'Brain-Free User', as opposed to 'power user / geek / nerd / IT professional'? If so, do you consider its usage 'widespread', at least in your ...
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1answer
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I have trouble with “puff” and “went full” in this sentence

I am not a native English speaker and I have been studying English by watching dramas. However, I am having trouble with slang and words which are not on dictionaries. From a drama, I don't ...
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4answers
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Origin of “for the birds” (Trivial; worthless; only of interest to gullible people.)

I really have looked, but the best I can come up with is this To say that something is "for the birds" is to call it horse manure. Dating from the days of horse-drawn traffic, the expression is ...
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2answers
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Etymology of adding articles to insulting or negative adjectives

Recently saw Deadpool(great movie), and noticed that Negasonic Teenage Warhead responded to something Deadpool said with "That a stupid." But a few months before that movie was released, I heard some ...
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3answers
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Is there a word like “stato” or 'stathole"?

Recently I've heard it on BBC's Documentary podcast (What Should we Teach Our Kids?, 1:14 min into the programme). It's described as British slang. Apparently it refers to a person who is an expert ...
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1answer
602 views

Is there an idiom about “dying monkey”?

is there an idiom sounding like "monkey dies" or "monkeys died"? What does it mean? I've been wondering since I heard Robert Plant song "Monkey": Tonight you will be mine | Tonight the monkey'll die. ...
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2answers
47 views

Colloquial term for a scam business

There are many disreputable businesses that operate on the idea that you pay them for the privilege of trying to sell their product(s). Is there a common term for this kind of scam; one that could be ...