Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
89 views

The meaning and etymology of the exclamation “Lawdy me!”

What does a speaker mean if he/she exclaims "Lawdy me!"? I noticed this exclamation when I was reading a short story "the Conscience of the Court" by Zora Neale Hurston. There was one brown-skinned ...
4
votes
2answers
81 views

What Kind of Connotations are Associated with the word 'Bruv'?

I encountered the slang word 'bruv' for the first time not long ago while playing Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel. The word is used quite a lot by a genius scientist character named Gladstone Katoa, but ...
7
votes
2answers
158 views

What is the origin of “dibs”?

Etymonline has this entry for dibs: Children's word to express a claim on something, 1932, originally U.S., apparently a contraction of dibstone "a knucklebone or jack in a children's game" ...
3
votes
2answers
77 views

Origin of golden parachute

noun 1. an employment contract or agreement guaranteeing a key executive of a company substantial severance pay and other financial benefits in the event of job loss caused by the company's being ...
27
votes
27answers
10k views

Derogatory term for a corporate employee

I’m looking for a derogatory term for a person who works in a big, international business. In Polish we have a few informal words for that, like korpoludek (“corpo little guy”) and korpoczłowiek ...
3
votes
3answers
239 views

How does the word “gas” relate to cheating and deception?

According to A Collection of College Words & Customs by Benjamin Homer Hall, written in 1856 I believe, gas is defined as cheating or deceiving someone. Any ideas why that may be?
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Word for a owing a free pass on withholding judgement

The word is on the tip of my tongue and I'm pretty sure it ends with "ie or y." The idea is a friend had a gracious attitude when I did something stupid, so now I want to return the favor. So I want ...
2
votes
3answers
55 views

Why do people substitute “Way” for “Much”?

Nowadays people often say "way more", "way better" etc. instead of using the word "much". How did this become popular usage?
4
votes
2answers
130 views

Why are Irish people called “turk” and “turkey”?

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (edited by John Ayto, John Simpson) lists the below slang words used for Irish people: bog-trotter, harp, Mick, Paddy, Pat, turk, turkey I can guess why these ...
39
votes
1answer
4k views

How did “s***” and “the s***” come to mean opposite things?

Your idea is shit Your idea is bad. Your idea is the shit Your idea is good. The same does not apply to "the crap" or "the poop", or other profanity like "the fuck". I can think of ...
8
votes
4answers
915 views

Is there a parallel to defenestration — for buses?

We often see defenestrate used in a somewhat jocular, mock-intellectual way for throwing someone or something out of a window. Is there, or could we imagine, a similar word for "throwing (someone) ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Meaning of “make cupcake” [on hold]

Could you please explain the meaning when someone says "He/She makes cupcakes"? It is definitely not about small cupcakes. I think it could be some kind of slang phrase. Thank you! Upd: UD says that ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Can a car be “naked”?

It's a rare event when I can't find the English equivalent for an Italian expression. It's even rarer when that Italian term consists of one word, but in English I have to build an entire phrase. ...
6
votes
4answers
341 views

Meaning of Jo's dialog in Chapter 16 of Bleak House

A portion of chapter 16 of Dickens' Bleak House is shown below. Jo attends closely while the words are being spoken; [...] and nods his ragged head. "I'm fly," says Jo. "But fen larks, you ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

“22 Acacia Avenue” British idiom

What is the meaning of this British idiom? I was watching BBC's Top Gear and the presenters were cracking jokes about people who live in the 22 of the avenues. And that the people who live there like ...
1
vote
3answers
55 views

“I gotta go” or “I've gotta go” [on hold]

While watching American TV series, I sometimes see a sentence, "I’ve gotta go," but sometimes an actor says “I gotta go” instead. Is there any difference between those things?
2
votes
4answers
111 views

A word to describe the type of literature read on toilet?

Is there an English word (recognised or slang) that describes the type of literature that is intended to be read in the toilet/bathroom/restroom? I've seen books in the past that seemed aimed ...
1
vote
2answers
697 views
12
votes
8answers
628 views

A wife who knows and accepts her husband's infidelity

What do you call a wife or woman who knows their spouse or partner is unfaithful but pretends either to (1) not care or (2) to not know? In this scenario it's important that the cheating spouse or ...
10
votes
7answers
7k views

Etymology of “to be like” meaning “to say”

It seems that "to be like" is an informal phrase for "to say". E.g. She was so angry, she was like "I'm breaking up with you", and I was like "I'm sorry", and she was like "Go away". Is this a ...
1
vote
4answers
323 views

Is there a pejorative/offensive slang word or phrase for a man who suffers from erectile dysfunction?

Erectile Dysfunction is defined as the consistent or recurrent inability to acquire or sustain an erection of sufficient rigidity and duration for sexual intercourse. Clinic 45 I'm a ...
8
votes
5answers
3k views

English term for aggressive street seller?

Is there an English term for the type of street seller who aggressively sells his products? The type who yell after you and may follow you as you walk down the street?
3
votes
3answers
297 views

What is the definition of a word? [closed]

I'm wondering what the minimal requirement for a word to be an actual word is. My opinion is that a word is a word if it can be understood and defined by everyone who hears it in conversation. For ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

What does the phrase “Have weight to ” mean?

I've watched a TV show about house renovation. After they take down a old window and carry it away. A guy says something like: It was a decent window. Jeepers have some weight to it What does ...
4
votes
1answer
171 views

Whatchamacallit is short for what? [closed]

Wikipedia says the slang "whatchamacallit" is short for "what you might call it", but I remember hearing at some point that it's actually short for "what'd your ma call it?" What is it short for?
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Dicing is a verb, Yes?

When you're playing yatzy or any other dice game, is it correct to use the verb "dicing" when notify whoever listening ? ..or is it a slang word ? Or is it neither ? Could be my ...
6
votes
6answers
406 views

Why does “smashing” mean “very good”?

Smashing is a BrE slang which means "very good" or "impressive". Most folks might know this already, due to its use as a catch phrase by various BrE characters in media. However, from the usual ...
0
votes
2answers
953 views

What does “I want you to do me” mean?

I read a conversation between two people. "I want you to do me on this table." What is the meaning of this sentence?
14
votes
2answers
960 views

What do “orange” and “spindle-shanked beaux” mean in this quote?

While looking up the word "bye" I found this 18th century quotation. Our present race of spindle-shanked beaux had rather close with an orange wench at the playhouse, than engage in a bye battle ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Photo creds or photo cred?

A lot of people nowadays use the phrase "photo creds" eg: Here's an awesome photo of me! Photo creds to John! Creds usually means credit or credits. But then you get the sentences: Photo ...
11
votes
1answer
274 views

What's “nutty” about fruit and cake?

Funnily enough, food is often used metaphorically to describe someone's eccentricity or level of sanity. We have nuts Slang. a foolish, silly, or eccentric person. an insane person; ...
0
votes
0answers
325 views

What does 'Flipperhead' mean?

Seen this in a few movies, spelling is probably incorrect. It appears to be an irish-american slang for an idiot in usage. Mostly interested in the correct spelling/actual word(s) and origin. The ...
8
votes
1answer
156 views

Who was “Toody Hotpot”?

My late mother (born in the 1920s in London, where she lived all her life) was fond of saying of anyone who wasn't helping in any particular job or activity that they were "Just standing around, like ...
2
votes
3answers
73 views

Are slang usages of “bud” common?

Are the slang usages of "bud" (mainly meaning cannabis, and occasionally clitoris, from what I understood) prevalent enough that I should avoid using them in a product intended for international ...
0
votes
2answers
75 views

the slang contraction of “what'd he” as in the sentence “what'd he come at you with”

What is the slang contraction of "What'd he" as in the sentence "What'd he come at you with"? "What'd he" is already a contraction but I mean in the same manner like whatcha = what're you=what've you, ...
9
votes
4answers
22k views

What is the origin of the phrase “There goes the neighborhood” and does it have racial connotations?

I understood the meaning of the phrase to be relatively benign and mostly used facetiously. Can it be viewed as offensive in contemporary conversation?
0
votes
2answers
27 views

what is a word or a phrase to convey -" no more?

What is a word or a phrase to say when we had too much of something weird. Example- An enthusiastic friend takes me to a play and its puzzling and rather unimpressive to me and I want to yell- ...
8
votes
4answers
25k views

What does “fleek” mean and when was it first used?

The word fleek is all over Twitter. The @lovihatibot Twitterbot routinely finds it in searches for "I love the word [X]" and "I hate the word [X]", in fact it's the third most hated word over the ...
6
votes
1answer
110 views

How and when did “bash” and “do” come to mean party?

I am on my way to a faculty party at the university. The Head of Sciences is retiring and is throwing a huge bash, all his staff, selected external examiners like me and various scientists from ...
9
votes
5answers
3k views

Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?

Searching Google for the history of the slang term "the bomb" (as in "That song is the bomb") yields a number of results in 40s/50s jazz glossaries, but they tend to at best give an artificial example ...
0
votes
2answers
90 views

Night do? What does it mean?

I'm watching a TV show about midwife, two ladies are taking: A: next year I'm gonna work Christmas because I'm getting married in the new year. B: are you? Is that when it is? Am I coming to the ...
7
votes
3answers
24k views

What is the origin of the phrase “buck naked”?

The phrase buck naked is well known and means "completely naked". It is synonymous to butt naked and stark naked, both self-explanatory. However, there are a few confusing aspects to the etymology of ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

Is there an abbreviation to denote "f***k You? [closed]

I frequently see people using various facebook expressions in official e-mails or in general text message. What bemuses me is that most of the time ""F***K you" is written/put as "f**K you". Please ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

“Kebabs, fruit machines, and brasses” — what do these slang words mean?

More from the British movie The Football Factory. In the following dialogue, the main character, a Cockney English speaker played by actor Danny Dyer, waxes philosophical about why he enjoys being a ...
8
votes
8answers
999 views

A polite substitution for “lamer”

Is there a polite word that can be used to designate someone who didn't really understand what he or she was doing? Or, in general, someone who is intentionally ignorant of how things work. A "lamer" ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Why are promiscuous women known as “slappers”?

Women who aren't interested in much more than sex are referred to as "slappers" in British English. British informal, derogatory a promiscuous or vulgar woman. Why is this? I can't find any ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

How to learn slang and idioms [closed]

I'm leaning English, but as you know using some slang sentences or idioms make your speaking more interesting than usual, so I just want to ask a question "How to learn slang ?" or "How to understand ...
4
votes
8answers
14k views

What's the origin of “throwing someone under the bus”?

What's the origin of the phrase "to throw someone under the bus" or "so-and-so threw me under the bus?" (in the sense of betrayal)? It seems like a very specific phrase not to come from some specific ...
-2
votes
1answer
56 views

Is there an idiom or slang word for “the last round of beer”?

I'm looking for a word or phrase that would fit here, where a few guys are drinking at a pub. A. "I must be going now." B. "Hey, wait, let's have ..............." which would mean a final drink ...