Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Get a life | You have no life

I saw this as a mild insult on the Internet, one person tells another: "get a life" or "you have no life". What does it mean literally and what is its meaning as an insult?
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vote
1answer
54 views

word for a condescending, snarky, yet awkward and jealous, person

i'm looking for a word for a person who is cynical, judgmental, nitpicking, condescending but also flawed, gawky and timid (in an unfamiliar setting), and is harboring some kind of jealousy towards ...
9
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9answers
8k views

Is there a less colloquial word (noun or adjective) to describe an “attention whore”?

It could be a noun or an adjective, and either could describe a person or an action. For example: "Did you hear Eric's wedding toast? He wouldn't shut up!" "I know, he was being a complete _______"
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3answers
3k views

How commonly does “done” replace “did”?

How common is it for native English speakers to actively replace the past tense 'did' with the past participle 'done'? I used to think it was only really done in rather vulgar dialects, but I have ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Holy holy=Holy s###?

I thought I heard the store manager (a native English speaker, mid-20's) muttered to himself like "Holy holy." That was when the store was newly opened and was so crowded with lots of customers. He ...
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3answers
1k views

What does it mean when someone calls himself “non sequitur”? [on hold]

Coming from my answer to question Is there a better noun form of “unreasonable” than “unreasonableness?” What does it mean when someone calls himself "non sequitur"? Examples: "I AM NON ...
16
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1answer
15k views

Etymology of “Buff” and “Nerf” as used in video-game slang

In video games, when the makers increase the power of something, it is sometimes referred to as a buff. If they decrease the power of something, it is called a nerf or a de-buff. This also applies ...
4
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3answers
233 views

What do you call tiny underdeveloped segments of an orange?

Sometimes after peeling your orange, you notice that there are also some underdeveloped segments inside it (figure 1), or at its base (figure 2). What do you call these tiny, underdeveloped ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

Word or expression for guys who slept with the same woman(prostitute)?

Embarrassingly, in Korean, there is a slang word for this kind of relationship between guys. Might be translated as, "the husband of my wife's sister but only by the hole" ? I don't know how can I ...
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0answers
43 views

“The sketched one” [migrated]

I'm new in the English world. This is my questions: can I say the sentence "the sketched one" to indicate a draft version of a work? Is it correct in english?
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vote
7answers
344 views

What is a less vulgar, but informal phrase for “talk a lot of s***”? [closed]

For some reason the phrase "talk a lot of stick" is coming into my mind when I think of a person who talks a lot of shit, but I couldn't find anything when I Googled it. Is there any phrase which ...
7
votes
4answers
208 views

Did British chef Jamie Oliver redefine “pukka” in 1999?

Recently I've been watching cooking programmes: MasterChef Italia (addictive), MasterChef USA (awful), followed swiftly by Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, and then onto Jamie Oliver's acclaimed The ...
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5answers
642 views

J. Oliver's usage of the word 'bog'

I have a question about the usage of the word 'bog' in the following sentence: Bog standard scoops of ice cream etc I understand that the meaning is 'form'; nevertheless, this is the first time ...
4
votes
5answers
3k views

what is the slang word for rich but uneducated people? especially those who live in rural areas and who like to show off?

What is the slang word for rich but uneducated people, especially those who live in rural areas and always like to show off?
5
votes
2answers
102 views

Where does the word 'Simoleon' come from?

Simoleon is another word for money. si·mo·le·on /səˈmōlēən/ I once thought that the word Simoleon came from the popular PC game The Sims. However, recently I heard the word used in ...
9
votes
2answers
12k views

Origin and variants of phrase: “let's blow this popsicle stand”

I'd like to know the origin and precursor or derivative variants of the phrase "let's blow this popsicle stand". Reliable, conclusive, source-supported, authoritative and consistent information about ...
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11answers
22k views

Is “Yankee” derogatory?

I have heard of the term "Yankee" often referring to people in the Northern U.S. by Southerners. My question is: is this term considered derogatory or offensive and should it be avoided in workplace ...
5
votes
1answer
162 views

Proper spelling of variant of “suspicious”

I'm not sure if it's an Aussie thing, but if something is suspicious, then it's sus(s), e.g: Someone added me on Facebook but they don't have a profile picture. I think they're a bit sus(s). The ...
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0answers
26 views

Usage of [sic] in a sentence with odd words

If you are quoting a sentence which includes a word such as staggerin' instead of staggering, would you insert "[sic]" to show that the word comes directly from the text? ex: would it be a) "She was ...
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4answers
2k views

Warmth of a seat that has been vacated by a person who was sitting on it

I fail to recall this word (could be informal in nature) that refers to the 'warmth of a seat that has just been vacated by someone seated on it for some time'. Anyone?
11
votes
4answers
842 views

Origin of the word “spraunce”

I was recently talking to someone who said a restaurant was spraunce, meaning it was well-presented and high-quality (that being the sense I was familiar with). We briefly discussed the fact that he ...
0
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1answer
128 views

What is the difference between “up in here” and “in here”? And what does “up in here” mean?

A friend of mine from London tried to explain the difference to me, but still I got no definite answer. He said "It's one thing," but "up in here" has... something... special—anyway I don't know.
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5answers
6k views

“I'm on the brew”

A conversation between two Scots: — What do you do for a living? — I'm on the brew. Assuming that I have the phrase right, what exactly does "on the brew" mean here? Based on the context, I ...
15
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4answers
938 views

“Oojakapiv”: what does this word mean?

A lot of people in my family use this word, not regularly, but enough for me to ask what it means. I know it’s not a “real word”, but how come people from different sides of my family use it? It must ...
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3answers
2k views

Anyroad and Anyway

As far as I know, anyway is a common word used by both American and British English speakers to mean in any case, nevertheless, etc. I never thought much about the word until I noticed that British ...
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4answers
171 views

“bucking for” .. like Klinger

In the culturally referrent 1970s USA TV show "MASH", about the Korean war, character Corporal Klinger acts "crazy", specifically wearing female clothing, ... because he is bucking for a section 8 ...
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1answer
1k views

I don't understande the usage of “either” in this sentence

"I couldn't sleep last night. I bet you guys couldn't either". Does the second sentence mean "I bet you too, guys"? Is it correct to use "either" like that or is it just slang?
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4answers
89 views

What does “our project has gone to Kan” mean? [closed]

I heard the expression, "our project has gone to Kan", and I thought it has gone to a new location. I was thinking, is there a location called "Kan" or "Can", or is it a short form for Canada? But ...
4
votes
2answers
165 views

Is there “BFU” acronym meaning 'Stupid Average User' (expressively) in English IT slang?

Have you ever encountered given initialism denoting 'Brain-Free User', as opposed to 'power user / geek / nerd / IT professional'? If so, do you consider its usage 'widespread', at least in your ...
0
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1answer
42 views

I have trouble with “puff” and “went full” in this sentence

I am not a native English speaker and I have been studying English by watching dramas. However, I am having trouble with slang and words which are not on dictionaries. From a drama, I don't ...
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4answers
15k views

Origin of “for the birds” (Trivial; worthless; only of interest to gullible people.)

I really have looked, but the best I can come up with is this To say that something is "for the birds" is to call it horse manure. Dating from the days of horse-drawn traffic, the expression is ...
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2answers
58 views

Etymology of adding articles to insulting or negative adjectives

Recently saw Deadpool(great movie), and noticed that Negasonic Teenage Warhead responded to something Deadpool said with "That a stupid." But a few months before that movie was released, I heard some ...
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3answers
43 views

Is there a word like “stato” or 'stathole"?

Recently I've heard it on BBC's Documentary podcast (What Should we Teach Our Kids?, 1:14 min into the programme). It's described as British slang. Apparently it refers to a person who is an expert ...
0
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1answer
582 views

Is there an idiom about “dying monkey”?

is there an idiom sounding like "monkey dies" or "monkeys died"? What does it mean? I've been wondering since I heard Robert Plant song "Monkey": Tonight you will be mine | Tonight the monkey'll die. ...
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2answers
45 views

Colloquial term for a scam business

There are many disreputable businesses that operate on the idea that you pay them for the privilege of trying to sell their product(s). Is there a common term for this kind of scam; one that could be ...
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2answers
1k views

How is the sentence “My mama don't like you, but she likes everyone” correct?

I just heard Love yourself by Justin Bieber. I thought I heard "My mama didn't like you but she likes everyone" from the song. Then later I found lyrics on some websites(listed bellow) but it's not ...
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votes
4answers
1k views

If something is considered the best why is it said to be “the berries”?

According to From Flappers to Rappers: A Study of American Youth Slang by Dr. Thomas Dalzell, "the berries" was a 1920s widely used slang term among American youth to describe something wonderful or ...
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4answers
6k views

What is the origin of the slang 'kicks' meaning sneakers

Street culture uses the term 'kicks' to describe sneakers/athletic shoes. I've been using this term for as long as I can remember so I'm comfortable with it's meaning however, as I'm sure I could make ...
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4answers
3k views

Origin of “chuck a wobbly”?

Chuck a wobbly is Australian slang for someone throwing a tantrum, and I like it because it invokes amusing imagery. I'm not certain of its origins however. I can see how it may be equivalent to the ...
0
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1answer
130 views

What is/are the origin/s of the use of “to end” to mean “to kill a person”?

Last night on two shows that I usually watch back-to-back on Tuesdays (NCIS and its spinoff set in New Orleans), the verb “end” was used in a way that seemed to mean “kill” (terminate/do away ...
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0answers
28 views

using “get + verb(pp)” to replace become, is this slang?

My question is about the use of (get + pp) to mean "become ______." I got laid. I got #%$&ed. I'm going to get hammered. She got schlonged.(Trumpism) Is this slang or syntactically correct? If ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

What does “in a blur” mean? [closed]

What does "in a blur" mean in the sentence below? Is it a slang? Does it mean "very fast"? "I grinned as I counted more quickly and ran the numbers together in a blur." Source: Counting Stars ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Expletive or exclamation meaning “exactly” or “precisely” [closed]

I have a friend who is an excellent non-native English speaker. However, when agreeing emphatically via text message, he will sometimes say "exact-fucking-ly!" This sounds odd compared to ...
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vote
4answers
85 views

Slang or idiom for someone who wants to gain weight or bulk up

What is a more colourful way of saying someone who wants to gain weight, increase their muscle size by going to the gym? He has been regularly visiting the gym in hopes of ___ Can I say ...
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votes
5answers
8k views

What does “country fellows” actually mean?

I searched on Internet for country fellows, but I couldn't find definition. What is the origin and the real meaning of country fellows? Edit: I didn't mean "fellow countrymen". does this phrase have ...
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10answers
1k views

Colorful idiom/phrase equivalent to French “s'en fourrer jusque là/plein la panse”

Is there an expression/idiom in English that comes anywhere close in flavor to the colorful French expression, s'en mettre (or fourrer or foutre) jusque là s'en mettre (or fourrer or foutre) ...
3
votes
5answers
5k views

Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?

"Hot Fuzz" is a british comedy-action-thriller movie from 2007, "fuzz" being a derogatory slang term for police. Is there any additional pun or play of words in the use of "Hot"? Or is it simply ...
4
votes
1answer
179 views

How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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votes
7answers
15k views

Why is an actor sometimes called 'ham'?

I came across the word 'ham' in an article which was used to refer to an actor. I referred the dictionary. But I was unclear of the fact that how can it be used to refer to an actor?
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votes
8answers
926 views

English equivalent for the French expression “péter de santé”

Is there an expression/idiom in English that carries pretty much the same connotation as what is implied by French "péter de santé"? WordReference actually gives for translation, "be bursting with ...