Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Did “Pokédex” recently become a slang term for iPhone? [closed]

Suddenly everyone is calling their iPhone a "pokédex". And not just comments in reddit. Actual industry people. How did I miss this?
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How did 'arching' come into use as a verb meaning 'to thwart'?

I have seen the word 'arch' used as a verb in the context of a villain causing trouble for a hero, or a hero thwarting a villain. It is also used when a villain is actively trying to become a hero's ...
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119 views

The math problem is too difficult for `X` to work out

There are four options: everybody, somebody, anybody and nobody. Which one should be used in X place ?
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183 views

Alternative to the idiomatic phrase “highway robbery”

I was wondering whether there were any other alternatives to the phrase "highway robbery". I am trying to say the same thing in a light-hearted, but not too casual way.
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Origin of Doobie (joint, marijuana cigarette)

OED says: doobie: a marijuana cigarette Origin unknown. A relationship with dobby has been suggested. dobby/dobbie: A silly old man, a dotard, a booby. Dialectal. First citations: ...
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746 views

Origin of “old school”

I always thought the phrase "old school" was a rather modern, hipster invention. It turns out the term itself is rather old-school, with Webster reporting the first recorded use in 1803. But I'm ...
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290 views

Does “housemate” imply a sexual relationship?

In a recent question, another user expressed concern that housemate has sexual connotations because of this definition at Dictionary.com: noun 1. a person with whom one shares a house or other ...
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Why is 'hell' considered a curse word?

Given the Wikipedia's list of profanities, you will see that it's somehow detached from the rest of curse words. The most commonly recognized profanities usually describe a body part, person or an ...
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170 views

What type of word is “abnomaly”?

I've got a coworker that frequently uses the word, "abnomaly", not "abnormal" and not "anomaly", but "abnomaly". While the types of these words differ (i.e. adjective versus noun), the meanings are ...
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Is there a female or gender-neutral equivalent to the colloquial “man”?

I don't know how to define the usage of man I'm talking about*, so I'll do it with examples: Hey, man, what's up? C'mon, man, don't make me do this. Is there a female or gender-neutral ...
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Why is “bombshell” used to describe attractive women?

Bombshell is a term used to describe very attractive women, similar to the term "sex symbol". The phrase was notably used as the title of a 1930's film, which incidentally lead to its lead actress ...
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Usage of “you is”

So I'm reading a book set in the American South in the beginning of the 1900 and I stumble upon the use of the verb is with you ("you is", "is you?") in conversations: eg. "is you Samson Fuller?". ...
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what is the slang word for rich but uneducated people? especially those who live in rural areas and who like to show off?

What is the slang word for rich but uneducated people, especially those who live in rural areas and always like to show off?
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A vague definition in a dictionary, “shag:a sexual partner of a specified ability”. Is there any better or plainer explanation?

I'm not a native English-reader, I'm Chinese. So mostly I get meanings of words by consulting dictionaries. I read this in a dictionary about the word shag: a sexual partner of a specified ...
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137 views

Etymology of “norton”?

The conversation took a turn towards Monty Python yesterday, and in particular the Life of Brian. This film featured as a character (Brian's putative father) the Roman soldier Nortonus Maximus, a name ...
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What does 'tickety boo' mean? [duplicate]

We had an engineer at our house the other day to check an appliance and he used the term 'tickety boo' at least three times. Clearly being British I am aware of the expression, and I also think I know ...
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What's exactly I'mma? I'mma go now, I'mma open that for you

When I chat I hear sometimes "I'mma ..." like in: "I'mma go now" or "I'mma open that for you" I am not sure how it's written, I have never got a precise answer when I asked. Should I learn to ...
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Difference between two phrases [closed]

Which is more appropriate to say: We go on learning We go about learning
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Where does the phrase “in good nick” come from?

The term "in good nick" meaning "in a good condition" came up in conversation and I realised I had no idea where it came from. Searching online seems surprisingly fruitless- there are several roots ...
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Origin of 'Son of a Gun' [duplicate]

According to the OED a 'son of a gun' was a child born to a woman who accompanied her husband on a Royal Navy gunship. However I distinctly remember hearing on a BBC Radio 4 history programme that the ...
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277 views

What do Australians mean when they say 'He came a gutsa'?

What does it mean to 'Come a gutsa'? I think I may have the Australian spelling right.
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668 views

Odd, but unoffensive slang or idioms [closed]

I'm putting a character in a book who is replacing all typical swear words, exclamations, or name calling with old fashioned or little known words. For instance, exclaiming "Snails" instead of Damn or ...
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Could 'otwards' or even 'hotwards' ever be accepted into the language?

I've just woken early from a vivid dream. (must be the local ale - we are in Yorkshire at the moment). I was in an inferno of an industrial kitchen where they were manufacturing 'ready-meals'. One ...
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Why do the British refer to things as 'posh'

Why do the British refer to something very smart, or people who are very well-off as being 'posh'?
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Origin of “chuck a wobbly”?

Chuck a wobbly is Australian slang for someone throwing a tantrum, and I like it because it invokes amusing imagery. I'm not certain of its origins however. I can see how it may be equivalent to the ...
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What is the origin of the idiom “tight fit” meaning a good joke?

I've recently been studying etymology and I received a book titled Flappers 2 Rappers: A Study of American Youth Slang written by Dr. Thomas Dalzell. Dr. Dalzell's research goes as far back as the ...
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Alternative term to 'Uncle Tom' for a black or colored person who is subservient to whites?

In Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, the eponymous character was meant to be a sort of model of resistance against slavery, a man who whose "devotion to his fellow slaves is so unshakable that he ...
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Boogie - Negative connotation?

I work in a company which has a product called "Boogie" (for reasons that the original owner knows). The product has been called that way for years in our French Canadian environment. Our few English ...
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What is the meaning of “backslash”

I have seen several people use the word backslash, it sounds like something similar to disaster, bad result, etc. But I am not quite sure what it means and when I should use it. Examples: But ...
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What word should I use to describe a kid who has pooped in their underwear?

I have seen some kids who can't go to the restroom in time and their poops stain on their underwear. I would like to know what word I can use to describe this situation?
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Etymology of “div”

Acting like a div yesterday:- a stupid or foolish person I started to wonder how this term of abuse came about. Urban Dictionary has a quaint tale:- Actually originates from prison slang in ...
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How to call certain kinds of tall shoes that women use to wear?

Because their strange features, even in my own language I find it difficult to decide by what name to call the shoes shown in the image below. I'm not looking for a technical term, but for a cute and ...
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175 views

When did “Twerking” and “Selfie” enter the dictionary?

I read in the news that twerking and selfie have been added to dictionary recently. Did it give any origin? Is there any information or details about them?
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Honey badger don't / doesn't care! [duplicate]

Why is it "Honey Badger don't care!" and not "Honey Badger doesn't care!" ?
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What is the origin of the slang 'kicks' meaning sneakers

Street culture uses the term 'kicks' to describe sneakers/athletic shoes. I've been using this term for as long as I can remember so I'm comfortable with it's meaning however, as I'm sure I could make ...
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Is there a derogatory word for “mobile phone” (cellphone) similar to “idiot box” for a television?

My father called our TV "the idiot box". Implying either that it had idiots on it, was targeted at idiots, or you were an idiot if you watched it too much. Is there any similar term in use but ...
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Does “This blows!” (it's bad) derive from “This sucks!”?

The origin of blow = suck, be bad/unpleasant recently came up in comments to this ELL question. I'd always assumed it was a standard slang "meaning reversal" from suck. But a few minutes on Google ...
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“Screwed” vs. “nailed”: why is the slang so different?

While the two names nail and screw have similar shapes and functions, why do the verbs differ so much? Someone has screwed something sounds like they have ruined something to me, while someone has ...
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“aim life with money” [closed]

I am planning for a tattoo with image of target logo. and the caption I thought is "Aim life with money" Money being an arrow and the life being the "center of target". I wanna make a point as in.. ...
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807 views

Is incharge/encharge a word? [closed]

I always thought the word incharge/encharge existed but I noticed my spell check kept marking it as wrong. Examples: "Who is encharge around here!?" The secretary is encharge of taking notes. I find ...
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What does the expression “rabbit-out-of-a-hat” mean? [duplicate]

I read this phrase on a guide for texts about mathematical logic, it says that this proof is “rabbit-out-of-a-hat”. What does this mean? Is it a slang expression? The exact sentence is: A ...
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Ogooglebar , ungoogleable or agoogleable?

If something cant be found after searching on google. Ogooglebar or some other term? Predictions? Is there already an accepted term?
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What does “do a take 5” mean?

The context is “We will always do a TAKE 5 prior to undertaking work”. I have no idea what a “take 5” is. I searched “take 5” on Google but I didn’t find an applicable explanation. Here is the ...
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2answers
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When did informal use of the word “like” become prevalent? [duplicate]

When and why did the word "like" come to be used to introduce an action, or even as a meaningless filler word, e.g. "He was like, [action or quote]."
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What does “saving the world, one X at a time” mean?

Does it mean that you are using X to save the world, or that you are saving the world by eliminating one X at a time?
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331 views

Just once I'd like a PB & PB

Not sure if that has a special meaning but I heard it in a movie: Just once I’d like a PB & PB. What does it mean? Here is a cartoon:
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138 views

Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word?

Usage: "I would not like to eat that pie as it looks all festy since you dropped it on the ground." Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word? Also, is it used elsewhere in the world? ...
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Is it right/appropriate to say “double bag it?”

What one would say to get another (plastic) bag for carrying heavy groceries? Is it right to tell the cashier "would you please double bag it?" I am asking this question because when I tried to ...
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571 views

Are words with negative meaning used to describe positive things by the youth? [closed]

In Germany, kids of age 10 to 15 tend to evolve a language pattern that uses a certain word that has a negative connotation to describe everything they approve of, be it an impressive slam-dunk or ...
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Would the word “tween” be considered a portmanteau or is it just a truncation?

Is it the word "between", but truncated, or a portmanteau of "in between" and "teen"?