Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Does “three corner” refer to South Australia? [closed]

In the NHK program Somewhere Street (Japanese: Sekai Fureai Machiaruki) on Adelaide, a lifesaver was quoted as saying what sounded like (pideo.net link at 14:25): Born down the road ... after ...
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Word meaning “to startle someone by surreptitiously poking them in the sides, from behind”

I inadvertently caused a great deal of amusement among a group of friends by incorrectly using the word "goose" to describe the action of sneaking up behind a person and poking, tickling, or touching ...
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Strange text on shirt

Is this text correct? Dont ever let anyone tell you you aine beautiful Someone told me that this is correct: it's a phonetic transcription (Afro Americans discard a lot of phonetic rules ...
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166 views

Why do people say the boyfriend instead of my boyfriend?

Why do people sometimes say the boyfriend instead of my boyfriend? Is it slang native to a particular part of the country?
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Did “courage to work” used to mean “must be willing to stay sober during working hours”?

I found this picture of a casting call from the 1960s, for the TV show and musical legend that eventually became known as "the Monkees": The phrase I'm asking about is "Courage to work". A friend ...
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321 views

Slang or idioms for someone in a doomed situation

Are there any idioms, slang or informal expressions for a bad situation that causes trouble for a person and seems impossible to get out of. An example: A guy lost a smartphone with a ton of ...
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792 views

What's the meaning of “un-PC”? [closed]

Yesterday, I came across the word "un-PC" while reading a book, and I couldn't find it in a dictionary. Can anybody explain it, please?
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Was “tickle (someone's) fancy” originally a double entendre?

Recently, I asked users to provide modern-day equivalents of idioms and expressions that contained the words fancy and tickle. The question is titled Whatever tickles their fancy in the US? I was ...
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Does “sb's ass” have a special meaning here, or just mean sb him/herself?

It may be a stupid question on this site, but it is somewhat bothering me: WARNING: containing strong language. In the movie Pulp Fiction, the character Marsellus Wallace says to Butch: You ...
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419 views

Envy vs jealousy - has the meaning changed?

When I was at school (in the 80's) I learnt that jealousy and envy meant different things: you are jealous if you think someone will take what you have, you are envious if you want what they have. In ...
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454 views

Shirty birty (bertie)?

I’ve been enjoying the BBC TV series Last Tango in Halifax, a show which regularly sends me to the dictionary in order to decipher certain inscrutable British-isms, the latest being “don’t get all ...
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'Scenic box'… is it correct?

I would like to use an expression that refers to a theatre space, a stage space, or any space for performing theatre: the space for a 'scene' in general. The expression is 'scenic box'. Is it ...
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680 views

Questions about meanings and usage of “deez nuts”

Please note, I did check the Urban Dictionary, and also Stack Exchange. What was meant by the OP in What is the origin of “Best.Boyfriend.Ever”? “What can I say but :/ omg deez nuts.” What ...
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443 views

What do you call a person who has a relationship with a much younger adult?

What do I call someone who marries or has a sexual relationship with someone much younger than themselves? Their partner is someone who is at least 18 years old. The term paedophile is not the ...
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3k views

classy sassy and a bit smart assy [closed]

classy sassy and a bit smart assy Can someone please explain the meaning of this?
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229 views

number one and number two as euphemisms for urinate/defecate. rationale for which is which?

After years of never knowing which is which, I finally looked it up and it seems number one is firmly taking a pee, while number two is taking a poo. This seems quite arbitrary so I am wondering the ...
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183 views

Is “Am” instead of “I am” proper slang? [duplicate]

I tried to coax google into finding results for "am not preceded by I", but failed. Now my question is: Is saying "Am" instead of "I am" valid slang? Examples: Am a God. Obey. Am driving. Can't ...
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216 views

Colloquial meaning of a hashtag

Despite its primarily functional origins, the hash tag has broken out of its social media context and is a kind of colloquialism, usually intended as a joke, but utilized in just about any form of ...
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249 views

“Shut my mouth wide open!”

"What is origin of the expression "Shut my mouth wide open."? Google search for the phrase produced nothing of interest.
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216 views

How rude is “dude” in online writing?

In online writing, such as on StackExchange sites, using the word "dude" is most likely unnecessary (it's obvious to whom a comment is addressed, and there are @mentions). What connotation does "dude" ...
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In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?

It is clear from this site that the verb to trump has been used extensively across Britain to refer to the breaking of wind. It is especially the case in the North, in Wales and certainly in Norfolk, ...
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686 views

Does “painted lady” sometimes mean prostitute?

Does "painted lady" or "painted ladies" sometimes mean prostitute(s), who used to heavily use make-up? I have a suspicion that even Shakespeare did so, but can't find anything indicating it. Urban ...
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734 views

Etymology of “horny”

What is the etymology of "horny"? It isn't related to rhino horn, because rhino horn isn't used as an aphrodisiac in traditional Chinese medicine. Wiktionary doesn't have any etymology info The ...
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Where did the phrase, “You did a bean,” come from?

I grew up in Texas in the 60s. My dad grew up in Waco and moved to New Jersey during World War II. He contributed may German phrases to our lives. My mom was born in central Texas, but her dad was ...
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In Gary Bernhardt's talk about Ruby and JavaScript surprises, what does “wat” mean?

There's a video of a conference presentation by Gary Bernhardt about surprising behavior in the Ruby and JavaScript computer programming languages. At the beginning of the video, Seth asks the ...
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Word for a particular “weird-looking” pose in a photograph?

By weird-looking I mean something like this, a facial expression that people often use when being photographed. I checked Thesaurus, but the words--freaky, funky, kooky--don't seem to have the "...
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How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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135 views

How to understand “cat's evening wear”?

I really had a difficult time to understand this. It comes from a book I am reading, and it is used to describe a concept the author speaks highly of. Does it mean that something is very special? Or ...
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511 views

what is the origin of the slang “jig is up”?

In the novel I'm reading there's the phrase "the gig is up," said to a villian who has just been caught. The form with which I'm familiar is "the jig is up." A gig as in a jazz performance? A jig ...
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280 views

A true proven origin of “copy that” [duplicate]

I always thought that "I copy that" was derived from an Italian "capisci" (capire = understand), but today I've read that this may be a radio slang only, not being derived from any other phrase. What ...
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260 views

Does “technie” mean “technical guy”?

I remembered that I read somewhere the word "technie" which means "technical guy". However, I could not see that definition on the internet. Seem like "technie" is a slang. So, Does "technie" mean "...
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400 views

When did “Whatever.” begin to be used as a sentence?

"Whatever." is often used in slang as if it were a complete sentence, vaguely conveying meanings such as "I don't care" or "I'm not going to challenge what you say, but I'm not necessarily going to ...
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show ownership of mom [closed]

My step daughter constantly while at my home says momma said.. while referring to her mother which is not me.. should she show ownership of momma while around people who do not share the same mother ...
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Slang word 'BEOCH' pronunciation

I managed to find on Internet the meaning of the word BEOCH which equals BITCH. But how is it pronounced left me wondering ! Could someone help me with, please .
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Goose or Chilly Bumps or Pimples?

I've heard many people use the term "goose bumps"; in my family, they were "goose pimples," but I don't know if this was peculiar to us, or if others also use it. My wife's family's saying for this ...
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Why doesn't it go like “him and his wife”?

Please take a look at this excerpt from The Catcher in the Rye: I think I probably woke he and his wife up, because it took them a helluva long time to answer the phone. This phrase confused me. ...
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318 views

Nailed, screwed, and hammered in one sentence

"Can someone be so "screwed" because someone "nailed" an argument that made him "hammered"? Is my sentence correct? Can we use those three slangs in one sentence? I understand that these slangs have ...
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What is the meaning of “cop” in: “if London cops it, he'll cop it”?

What is the meaning of the text in bold: He says if London cops it, he'll cop it. And not to worry, Dad. I have found these meanings for cop in The Free Dictionary, but none of them seem ...
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368 views

Non standard english: Slang. “That sucks man.” [closed]

Where does the term 'That sucks!' and putting 'man' on the end of sentences come from? "aw that sucks, man!" Thanks!
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What does “Sp 12” mean?

I been listening to Playaz Club by Rappin 4-Tay. In the lyrics at one point he mentions this: I got a hoe named Real de Real She got a buddy named SP 12, now, you know the deal We getz freaky in ...
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Which is more appropriate: “I gonna” or “I am gonna”? [closed]

I want to ask about verb "to be" in gonna, specifically about which form is more accurate. I am gonna or I gonna and They gonna or They are gonna
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What is a name someone would describe a false homophobe? [closed]

What would you call a person who calls another person a "faggot" in a very hateful way, when this other person is not a homosexual.
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English equivalent of two popular Chinese slangs: 学霸 (academic overlord) and 学婊 (academic bitch)

In popular Chinese language, especially in Internet Chinese language, we use the word "学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who ...
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Is the term “you suck” always considered slang? [closed]

I'm having a serious argument with a friend on the status of the word "suck" when I used it about him by saying "You suck!" because he missed a train. We are both non-native English speakers. He ...
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What does “do not get (too) vibed that something happened” mean? There is no clue in any dictionary

I stumbled upon this construction: “don’t get (too) vibed”, but I couldn’t get what does it mean. And there is no dictionary that gives an explanation, as far as I can see. “Vibe” is a very special ...
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183 views

Colloquial American term for “miliaria”

Often during summers in the tropics, especially under intense heat conditions, we get a skin condition medically referred to as "miliaria." It comprises of reddish rashes with several tiny boil-like ...
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What is a word that describes when someone requires a certain quality of another person in order for them to be a possible dating option?

This has been bugging me for the past 30 minutes. It's basically some sort of specific criteria you hold in order to even consider dating someone, like "My girlfriend has to like Star Wars," or "My ...
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Term for words like “Hanky-Panky” [duplicate]

Is there a name for these kind of doubled words? For example: hanky-panky flim-flam hoity-toity boo-hoo zig-zag Note that some rhyme and others do not.
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Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?

Did they say "hand job" in the 1800s? I was watching an episode of Deadwood, and they just said it. For example, from episode 6 "Plague": (Al enters the back room, Dolly is scrunched up on the ...
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Yikes! Where did it come from?

(humorous, slang) Expressing fear. (humorous, slang) Expressing empathy with unpleasant or undesirable circumstances. [Wiktionary] Yikes! Where did it come from? OED says "Origin unknown,...