Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

4
votes
5answers
3k views

what is the slang word for rich but uneducated people? especially those who live in rural areas and who like to show off?

What is the slang word for rich but uneducated people, especially those who live in rural areas and always like to show off?
5
votes
2answers
134 views

Where does the word 'Simoleon' come from?

Simoleon is another word for money. si·mo·le·on /səˈmōlēən/ I once thought that the word Simoleon came from the popular PC game The Sims. However, recently I heard the word used in ...
21
votes
11answers
23k views

Is “Yankee” derogatory?

I have heard of the term "Yankee" often referring to people in the Northern U.S. by Southerners. My question is: is this term considered derogatory or offensive and should it be avoided in workplace ...
5
votes
1answer
164 views

Proper spelling of variant of “suspicious”

I'm not sure if it's an Aussie thing, but if something is suspicious, then it's sus(s), e.g: Someone added me on Facebook but they don't have a profile picture. I think they're a bit sus(s). The ...
8
votes
4answers
3k views

Warmth of a seat that has been vacated by a person who was sitting on it

I fail to recall this word (could be informal in nature) that refers to the 'warmth of a seat that has just been vacated by someone seated on it for some time'. Anyone?
11
votes
4answers
888 views

Origin of the word “spraunce”

I was recently talking to someone who said a restaurant was spraunce, meaning it was well-presented and high-quality (that being the sense I was familiar with). We briefly discussed the fact that he ...
19
votes
5answers
7k views

“I'm on the brew”

A conversation between two Scots: — What do you do for a living? — I'm on the brew. Assuming that I have the phrase right, what exactly does "on the brew" mean here? Based on the context, I ...
15
votes
4answers
987 views

“Oojakapiv”: what does this word mean?

A lot of people in my family use this word, not regularly, but enough for me to ask what it means. I know it’s not a “real word”, but how come people from different sides of my family use it? It must ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Anyroad and Anyway

As far as I know, anyway is a common word used by both American and British English speakers to mean in any case, nevertheless, etc. I never thought much about the word until I noticed that British ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

I don't understande the usage of “either” in this sentence

"I couldn't sleep last night. I bet you guys couldn't either". Does the second sentence mean "I bet you too, guys"? Is it correct to use "either" like that or is it just slang?
1
vote
4answers
111 views

What does “our project has gone to Kan” mean? [closed]

I heard the expression, "our project has gone to Kan", and I thought it has gone to a new location. I was thinking, is there a location called "Kan" or "Can", or is it a short form for Canada? But ...
4
votes
2answers
178 views

Is there “BFU” acronym meaning 'Stupid Average User' (expressively) in English IT slang?

Have you ever encountered given initialism denoting 'Brain-Free User', as opposed to 'power user / geek / nerd / IT professional'? If so, do you consider its usage 'widespread', at least in your ...
10
votes
4answers
16k views

Origin of “for the birds” (Trivial; worthless; only of interest to gullible people.)

I really have looked, but the best I can come up with is this To say that something is "for the birds" is to call it horse manure. Dating from the days of horse-drawn traffic, the expression is ...
1
vote
2answers
61 views

Etymology of adding articles to insulting or negative adjectives

Recently saw Deadpool(great movie), and noticed that Negasonic Teenage Warhead responded to something Deadpool said with "That a stupid." But a few months before that movie was released, I heard some ...
0
votes
3answers
46 views

Is there a word like “stato” or 'stathole"?

Recently I've heard it on BBC's Documentary podcast (What Should we Teach Our Kids?, 1:14 min into the programme). It's described as British slang. Apparently it refers to a person who is an expert ...
0
votes
1answer
667 views

Is there an idiom about “dying monkey”?

is there an idiom sounding like "monkey dies" or "monkeys died"? What does it mean? I've been wondering since I heard Robert Plant song "Monkey": Tonight you will be mine | Tonight the monkey'll die. ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Colloquial term for a scam business

There are many disreputable businesses that operate on the idea that you pay them for the privilege of trying to sell their product(s). Is there a common term for this kind of scam; one that could be ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

If something is considered the best why is it said to be “the berries”?

According to From Flappers to Rappers: A Study of American Youth Slang by Dr. Thomas Dalzell, "the berries" was a 1920s widely used slang term among American youth to describe something wonderful or ...
4
votes
4answers
7k views

What is the origin of the slang 'kicks' meaning sneakers

Street culture uses the term 'kicks' to describe sneakers/athletic shoes. I've been using this term for as long as I can remember so I'm comfortable with it's meaning however, as I'm sure I could make ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Origin of “chuck a wobbly”?

Chuck a wobbly is Australian slang for someone throwing a tantrum, and I like it because it invokes amusing imagery. I'm not certain of its origins however. I can see how it may be equivalent to the ...
0
votes
1answer
149 views

What is/are the origin/s of the use of “to end” to mean “to kill a person”?

Last night on two shows that I usually watch back-to-back on Tuesdays (NCIS and its spinoff set in New Orleans), the verb “end” was used in a way that seemed to mean “kill” (terminate/do away with/etc)...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

using “get + verb(pp)” to replace become, is this slang?

My question is about the use of (get + pp) to mean "become ______." I got laid. I got #%$&ed. I'm going to get hammered. She got schlonged.(Trumpism) Is this slang or syntactically correct? If ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What does “in a blur” mean? [closed]

What does "in a blur" mean in the sentence below? Is it a slang? Does it mean "very fast"? "I grinned as I counted more quickly and ran the numbers together in a blur." Source: Counting Stars (...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Expletive or exclamation meaning “exactly” or “precisely” [closed]

I have a friend who is an excellent non-native English speaker. However, when agreeing emphatically via text message, he will sometimes say "exact-fucking-ly!" This sounds odd compared to "abso-...
1
vote
4answers
121 views

Slang or idiom for someone who wants to gain weight or bulk up

What is a more colourful way of saying someone who wants to gain weight, increase their muscle size by going to the gym? He has been regularly visiting the gym in hopes of ___ Can I say ‘...
5
votes
5answers
9k views

What does “country fellows” actually mean?

I searched on Internet for country fellows, but I couldn't find definition. What is the origin and the real meaning of country fellows? Edit: I didn't mean "fellow countrymen". does this phrase have ...
7
votes
10answers
1k views

Colorful idiom/phrase equivalent to French “s'en fourrer jusque là/plein la panse”

Is there an expression/idiom in English that comes anywhere close in flavor to the colorful French expression, s'en mettre (or fourrer or foutre) jusque là s'en mettre (or fourrer or foutre) ...
3
votes
5answers
6k views

Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?

"Hot Fuzz" is a british comedy-action-thriller movie from 2007, "fuzz" being a derogatory slang term for police. Is there any additional pun or play of words in the use of "Hot"? Or is it simply ...
4
votes
1answer
193 views

How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
17
votes
7answers
17k views

Why is an actor sometimes called 'ham'?

I came across the word 'ham' in an article which was used to refer to an actor. I referred the dictionary. But I was unclear of the fact that how can it be used to refer to an actor?
6
votes
8answers
944 views

English equivalent for the French expression “péter de santé”

Is there an expression/idiom in English that carries pretty much the same connotation as what is implied by French "péter de santé"? WordReference actually gives for translation, "be bursting with ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

How to rephrase “responsibility sucks” [duplicate]

I need a different word than sucks that is still a verb, but not a being verb with an adjective. As in, I don't want to say "responsibility is awful" or something of that kind.
6
votes
4answers
3k views

Origin of “old school”

I always thought the phrase "old school" was a rather modern, hipster invention. It turns out the term itself is rather old-school, with Webster reporting the first recorded use in 1803. But I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

The Meaning of “Crank” in Scotts slang?

On a train, earlier today I overheard one Scottish guy say to another: "There's nary a hold chap in that bunch of slordy, poofy freeks. All o' 'em is crank in the head, that's what I say". I have ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Usage of “bottle it” to refer to being in a position to win, but losing [closed]

This BBC Sport web page has the following text at 14:11: Umair Gooner Ahmed: Pakistan just done an Arsenal and bottled it. This answer has a meaning for "bottling it" of not being brave ...
81
votes
20answers
503k views

Which expressions can be used to close an email? [closed]

At the end of written communication like emails and letters, it is customary to use a closing valediction or "complementary close". Which formal and informal expressions can be used to end emails?
1
vote
0answers
15 views

“been a watching”, “been a playing” - why? [duplicate]

I first encountered adding an "a" before a verb in songs in phrases such as "I've been a-playing". At first I thought that songwriters add it when they need one more syllable to make a verse sound ...
0
votes
2answers
472 views

phrase or idiom meaning 'I don't have enough money nowadays.' [closed]

Is there any phrase or idiom meaning 'I don't have enough money nowadays'? I just want to know sentences which are used in everyday life.
12
votes
10answers
4k views

Origin of “hating on”

What is the origin of the slang phrase hating on? Google Trends suggests that the phrase did not enter the lexicon until early 2009. I'm curious where the phrase originated. As Stefano Palazzo ...
4
votes
4answers
74 views

final though-tag: That tongue at the end tho; That victory dance though

For the last few years the internet has abounded with expressions ending in a kinda of "though-tag" in final position, especially in comments to GIFs and the like, such as the following: That ...
4
votes
1answer
217 views

History of the phrase “I was like..” or “I was all…”

When telling a story, it's near essential at some point to state what you said or felt. The younger generation uses phrases "I was like...", OR the similar "I was all...", to express a past state or ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

Does English slang have a feminine version of “breaking someone's balls”?

A question out of curiosity. Probably Not Safe For Work. Often times, I come across this phrase especially in Hollywood movies and sitcoms. Depending on how it's used, it either means that "someone ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Etymology of the expression “make a larry”, i.e. turn left

Where I live (Canada) people sometimes say "hang a larry" or "make a larry" when they mean turn left, like when they're driving. I'm at a dinner party and we're trying to figure out where this ...
0
votes
1answer
154 views

Less formal way of saying “I'm going offline”

Imagine a situation I'm going to the subway and will lose signal any moment. How would you tell someone you will lose signal soon? Or that you're going .. Offline essentially? Is "going dark" the ...
8
votes
4answers
16k views

Origin of “toffee-nosed”

What's the origin of toffee-nosed (snobbish, disdainful, stuck-up)? Is it related to "toff" (upper-class)?
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Etymology of 'Pizzazz'

A question from December 2011 asked What is the social context of "pizzazz"?. I'm curious about the word's etymology. I checked some reference books, but they showed very little agreement ...
52
votes
5answers
28k views

“Screwed” vs. “nailed”: why is the slang so different?

While the two names nail and screw have similar shapes and functions, why do the verbs differ so much? Someone has screwed something sounds like they have ruined something to me, while someone has ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

How do I refer to a swear word without saying it?

What is the correct way to indicate a specific swear word without actually writing it? Such as H--- instead of "hell."
6
votes
9answers
3k views

Can the word “special” have a negative connotation?

I am involved with a group that works with children aged about 7, who've been through some difficult things. One of the sessions focuses on how "every one of you is special". Recently, somebody's ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Meaning of “black on black” in Nickelback's “Animals”

The song "Animals" by Nickelback starts with the following lines: I, I'm driving black on black Just got my license back I got this feeling in my veins This train is coming off the ...