Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Origin of “hating on”

What is the origin of the slang phrase hating on? Google Trends suggests that the phrase did not enter the lexicon until early 2009. I'm curious where the phrase originated. As Stefano Palazzo ...
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final though-tag: That tongue at the end tho; That victory dance though

For the last few years the internet has abounded with expressions ending in a kinda of "though-tag" in final position, especially in comments to GIFs and the like, such as the following: That ...
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1answer
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History of the phrase “I was like..” or “I was all…”

When telling a story, it's near essential at some point to state what you said or felt. The younger generation uses phrases "I was like...", OR the similar "I was all...", to express a past state or ...
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Does English slang have a feminine version of “breaking someone's balls”?

A question out of curiosity. Probably Not Safe For Work. Often times, I come across this phrase especially in Hollywood movies and sitcoms. Depending on how it's used, it either means that "someone ...
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Etymology of the expression “make a larry”, i.e. turn left

Where I live (Canada) people sometimes say "hang a larry" or "make a larry" when they mean turn left, like when they're driving. I'm at a dinner party and we're trying to figure out where this ...
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Less formal way of saying “I'm going offline”

Imagine a situation I'm going to the subway and will lose signal any moment. How would you tell someone you will lose signal soon? Or that you're going .. Offline essentially? Is "going dark" the ...
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Origin of “toffee-nosed”

What's the origin of toffee-nosed (snobbish, disdainful, stuck-up)? Is it related to "toff" (upper-class)?
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Etymology of 'Pizzazz'

A question from December 2011 asked What is the social context of "pizzazz"?. I'm curious about the word's etymology. I checked some reference books, but they showed very little agreement ...
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“Screwed” vs. “nailed”: why is the slang so different?

While the two names nail and screw have similar shapes and functions, why do the verbs differ so much? Someone has screwed something sounds like they have ruined something to me, while someone has ...
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How do I refer to a swear word without saying it?

What is the correct way to indicate a specific swear word without actually writing it? Such as H--- instead of "hell."
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Can the word “special” have a negative connotation?

I am involved with a group that works with children aged about 7, who've been through some difficult things. One of the sessions focuses on how "every one of you is special". Recently, somebody's ...
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Meaning of “black on black” in Nickelback's “Animals”

The song "Animals" by Nickelback starts with the following lines: I, I'm driving black on black Just got my license back I got this feeling in my veins This train is coming off the ...
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“~holic” or “~aholic”? Which one could be the most appropriate?

I've heard words like bookaholic, workaholic, etc., but why the 'a' before them? On the other hand, I've also discovered Asian bands, songs or other stuff with names like Swing-Holic, Sound-Holic, etc....
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What is the etymology of “fanboi”?

In a recent Daring Fireball post, John Gruber wondered about the origin of "fanboi" as a spelling of "fanboy". I tried searching for this, but couldn't find anything definitive. Harry McCracken has ...
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In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?

It is clear from this site that the verb to trump has been used extensively across Britain to refer to the breaking of wind. It is especially the case in the North, in Wales and certainly in Norfolk, ...
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1answer
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Meaning and usage of “Make me”

Sometimes the literal translations of "slang" sentences just don't make sense, so after reading a "Make me" answer (which I consider slang, due to its informal use, if I'm not wrong) to a request I ...
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Usage of “got” as a subsitute of “taking care of”?

I want to represent a situation in which the character is sad because her boyfriend isn't there, then a guy says: "in any case don't worry, I got you". It is meant to be something like "I will take ...
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Did the slang term “The Bomb” meaning “Very Cool” come from the American Jazz scene?

Searching Google for the history of the slang term "the bomb" (as in "That song is the bomb") yields a number of results in 40s/50s jazz glossaries, but they tend to at best give an artificial example ...
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Where does the phrase “in good nick” come from?

The term "in good nick" meaning "in a good condition" came up in conversation and I realised I had no idea where it came from. Searching online seems surprisingly fruitless- there are several roots ...
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The origin of the term half assed

Does this slang originate from half asked, since the difinition means exactly that. You only did half what I asked you.
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Can the word God be colloquially replaced with f***? [closed]

I stumbled across these lyrics from "Enter Shikari - The Last Garrison": Head's up and thank fuck you're still alive! It sounds like that there was "God" replaced with "fuck". It even sounds ...
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Meaning of the slang “a”? [duplicate]

What does the a mean in the following sentences? She is a do it like this. Sam is a visit the new market today. Does the word a represent a future action like : Sam will visit the new market ...
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Alternative term to 'Uncle Tom' for a black or colored person who is subservient to whites?

In Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, the eponymous character was meant to be a sort of model of resistance against slavery, a man who whose "devotion to his fellow slaves is so unshakable that he ...
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word for that time of the month where funds are running low and you gotta wait til payday [closed]

Basically title, but is the meaning of the Indonesian phrase "tanggal Tua". Any ideas?
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“lmfaoooooooo”, “nooooooo” and other elongated words [closed]

Is there are phrase for elongating a word based off a less formal way of speaking (or would speak for colloquialisms like lmfao)? examples: noooooooo -> no yeaaaaaahhhh -> yeah loooooool -&...
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Can the term “G-Man” be used to describe a Government official who is not an FBI agent?

Earlier today I was doing Merl Reagle's crossword and one of the clues was "Fraud fighting Fed." The answer turned out to be "T-Man," being short for "Treasury Man." So, this got me thinking... ...
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word for false nostalgia

Is there a word to describe nostalgia for things that never existed? For example, a 1950s-style diner is supposed to reconstruct a cultural archetype, but there never existed such a diner. John Wayne ...
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2answers
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Looking for a slang expression to say “I´m pissed off and sad. I want to be alone” [closed]

I found some things like Being on the dumps, but I would also like to say in the same line that I'd rather to be alone.
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Origin of “how we/I roll”?

The phrase "that's how we roll" (along with variants) seems to have become increasingly popular in recent years. It appears to draw attention to one's behavior or policies, asserting -- sometimes ...
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2answers
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What does the colloquial “b” mean? Is it a gangland expression?

If you watch The Wire, you'll notice that Stringer calls Avon "B" quite often. What does it mean? Is it short for "buddy"? When and where did people start using this expression?
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What do you call someone who solves puzzles?

What is a term or name for someone who is very adept at solving puzzles or situations that require though processing and logic. I ran across this question, however this only deals with crossword ...
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A slang word for person who is addicted to mass media promoted pop-culture [closed]

I am looking for a slang term which describes people who are all about contemporary mass media promoted pop culture: pop song charts, YouTube likes, dislikes and comments, celebrities' instagrams, etc....
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Is there an online site or API that provides definitive, uncensored translations of internet slang words?

I am a computer scientist studying on sentiment analysis. I need to retrieve uncensored translations of internet slang words such as wtf, lmfao. There are some websites that provide translations for ...
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Where did the phrase “shut up” as an expression of disbelief or amazement originate?

I recently heard shut up used according to this definition in Urban dictionary. shut·up (shuht-up) --interjection 1. An expression of disbelief. 2. Amazement; astonishment. I've only ...
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If the use of the word “Exes” being the plural of the word Ex is fine [ 2 ] How come former boy/girl friends are also described as Ex?

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2015 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved defines the word "ex" as below: "ex 3 (...
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“Giver of false hope” translation?

The term "PHP" (no, not the programming language) stands for pemberi harapan palsu which roughly means giver of false hope in English. An example of usage would be: "Sialan lo, PHP ya! Katanya mau ...
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If you're “balled up” why are you confused?

I believe the expression 'balled up' dates back to the first decade of the twentieth century and I believe it means 'confused' but I'm all balled up as to why it means 'confused'. The only ...
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What is the exact meaning of “You've got yourself a deal”? Is it only an American slang?

I came across the phrase, ‘got yourself a deal’ being introduced as a vulgar American English by a character in Jeffery Archer’s, fiction “The Fourth Estate.” In the scene Keith Townsend, Australian ...
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All up in my grill?

Is the phrase [all] up in $POSSESSIVE_PRONOUN grill which is synonymous with the figure of speech in one's face an automotive metaphor? If so, would it be more correct to spell the last ...
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Date as a synonym for anus

In the Song "Ten Foot Cock And A Few Hundred Virgins" Tim Minchin uses the phrase "it's a sin to take it up the date, even if it's great, even with your cowboy mate". I'm not a native English speaker -...
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7answers
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What do you call someone who is obsessed with video games?

I need a slang word which means someone addicted to playing video or computer games. Could gameaholic work? It can't be nerd or geek because although those expressions denote someone who is ...
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2answers
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What do you call that annoying toddler that whines about everything?

You know that kid you see in a supermarket with his/her mom, and the kid is all like: "I don't like that", and starts to scream? What is a good word or slang term for that?
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What does “flustrated” mean, and is it a word?

What does the flustrated mean? Is it even a word? I am using Lingea Lexicon and it doesn’t know this word, but the Internet is full of it. I find myself getting mad at people for using it both in ...
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3answers
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Why is German anti-aircraft fire called “Archibald”?

Reading The War Illustrated (January 30th, 1915 number), I came across this passage:- At this speed they offer a comparatively stationary mark for the German anti-aircraft guns, always known as ...
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2answers
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Is there a term for someone who barely moves their arms whilst walking?

I know someone who barely moves his arms when he walks, a bit like Frankenstein's monster. There is a Seinfeld episode ("The Summer of George") in which someone with the same behaviour is made fun of ...
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What's “quippy messages”? [closed]

When someone was talking about the online dating, like... "It's addicting. The pictures and quippy messages." What does "quippy message" mean?
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Word meaning “to startle someone by surreptitiously poking them in the sides, from behind”

I inadvertently caused a great deal of amusement among a group of friends by incorrectly using the word "goose" to describe the action of sneaking up behind a person and poking, tickling, or touching ...
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The meaning of the following lines?

I encountered the following sentence when reading the book "Algebra for young mind": For others, however, mathematics is a daunting subject, whether it takes the form of equations on a whiteboard or ...
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Why do Aussies use “cactus” to mean “dead,” “useless,” or “broken”?

This bloody washing machine is cactus! Glossaries / dictionaries of Australian slang (like this one, and this one) list cactus as meaning "dead, useless, or broken." How did this usage come about?
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What is the expression/slang to describe that you suddenly decided to go [travel, change environment]?

For example you get tired of your job and saying: Oh,[expression, meaning to go] overseas/bar? I'm translating songs from Russian..