Slang is a type of language that consists of words, and phrases, that are regarded as very informal.

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Derogatory term for a corporate employee

I’m looking for a derogatory term for a person who works in a big, international business. In Polish we have a few informal words for that, like korpoludek (“corpo little guy”) and korpoczłowiek ...
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2answers
105 views

What does the phrase “Have weight to ” mean?

I've watched a TV show about house renovation. After they take down a old window and carry it away. A guy says something like: It was a decent window. Jeepers have some weight to it What does ...
4
votes
1answer
197 views

Whatchamacallit is short for what? [closed]

Wikipedia says the slang "whatchamacallit" is short for "what you might call it", but I remember hearing at some point that it's actually short for "what'd your ma call it?" What is it short for?
6
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2answers
406 views

Why are Irish people called “turk” and “turkey”?

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (edited by John Ayto, John Simpson) lists the following slang words used for Irish people: bog-trotter, harp, Mick, Paddy, Pat, turk, turkey I can guess why ...
0
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1answer
164 views

The meaning and etymology of the exclamation “Lawdy me!”

What does a speaker mean if he/she exclaims "Lawdy me!"? I noticed this exclamation when I was reading a short story "the Conscience of the Court" by Zora Neale Hurston. There was one brown-skinned ...
0
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1answer
46 views

Is 'dicing' a verb in dice games?

When you're playing Yahtzee or any other dice game, is it correct to use the verb "dicing" when you want to notify whoever is listening? Or is "dicing" a slang word ? Or is it neither? Could it be my ...
15
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8answers
795 views

A wife who knows and accepts her husband's infidelity

What do you call a wife or woman who knows their spouse or partner is unfaithful but pretends either to (1) not care or (2) to not know? In this scenario it's important that the cheating spouse or ...
14
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2answers
985 views

What do “orange” and “spindle-shanked beaux” mean in this quote?

While looking up the word "bye" I found this 18th century quotation. Our present race of spindle-shanked beaux had rather close with an orange wench at the playhouse, than engage in a bye battle ...
0
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1answer
504 views

Photo creds or photo cred?

A lot of people nowadays use the phrase "photo creds" eg: Here's an awesome photo of me! Photo creds to John! Creds usually means credit or credits. But then you get the sentences: Photo ...
0
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2answers
97 views

the slang contraction of “what'd he” as in the sentence “what'd he come at you with”

What is the slang contraction of "What'd he" as in the sentence "What'd he come at you with"? "What'd he" is already a contraction but I mean in the same manner like whatcha = what're you=what've you, ...
2
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3answers
88 views

Are slang usages of “bud” common?

Are the slang usages of "bud" (mainly meaning cannabis, and occasionally clitoris, from what I understood) prevalent enough that I should avoid using them in a product intended for international ...
0
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2answers
33 views

what is a word or a phrase to convey -" no more?

What is a word or a phrase to say when we had too much of something weird. Example- An enthusiastic friend takes me to a play and its puzzling and rather unimpressive to me and I want to yell- ...
0
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0answers
792 views

What does 'Flipperhead' mean?

Seen this in a few movies, spelling is probably incorrect. It appears to be an irish-american slang for an idiot in usage. Mostly interested in the correct spelling/actual word(s) and origin. The ...
6
votes
1answer
208 views

How and when did “bash” and “do” come to mean party?

I am on my way to a faculty party at the university. The Head of Sciences is retiring and is throwing a huge bash, all his staff, selected external examiners like me and various scientists from ...
0
votes
2answers
131 views

Night do? What does it mean?

I'm watching a TV show about midwife, two ladies are taking: A: next year I'm gonna work Christmas because I'm getting married in the new year. B: are you? Is that when it is? Am I coming to the ...
2
votes
2answers
118 views

Is there an abbreviation to denote "f***k You? [closed]

I frequently see people using various facebook expressions in official e-mails or in general text message. What bemuses me is that most of the time ""F***K you" is written/put as "f**K you". Please ...
3
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2answers
104 views

Origin of golden parachute

noun 1. an employment contract or agreement guaranteeing a key executive of a company substantial severance pay and other financial benefits in the event of job loss caused by the company's being ...
8
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1answer
167 views

Who was “Toody Hotpot”?

My late mother (born in the 1920s in London, where she lived all her life) was fond of saying of anyone who wasn't helping in any particular job or activity that they were "Just standing around, like ...
0
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1answer
75 views

How to learn slang and idioms [closed]

I'm leaning English, but as you know using some slang sentences or idioms make your speaking more interesting than usual, so I just want to ask a question "How to learn slang ?" or "How to understand ...
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votes
1answer
68 views

Is there an idiom or slang word for “the last round of beer”?

I'm looking for a word or phrase that would fit here, where a few guys are drinking at a pub. A. "I must be going now." B. "Hey, wait, let's have ..............." which would mean a final drink ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is such usage of negation acceptable in everyday conversation? [duplicate]

Let's begin with a sentence such as: We can't do this any more. This is the most standard form and grammatically perfect. But I have also seen or heard many times in some informal occasions ...
2
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3answers
66 views

Why do people substitute “Way” for “Much”?

Nowadays people often say "way more", "way better" etc. instead of using the word "much". How did this become popular usage?
2
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4answers
167 views

A word to describe the type of literature read on toilet?

Is there an English word (recognised or slang) that describes the type of literature that is intended to be read in the toilet/bathroom/restroom? I've seen books in the past that seemed aimed ...
5
votes
1answer
149 views

Martini, Extra Dirty

This expression is from the show "True Detective" (Session 1 Episode 6) A guy buys a woman a drink when they have just met, then she asks waiter to "martini, extra dirty". This is the first time I've ...
0
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3answers
508 views

Antonym of “misnomer”

I believe I have heard the word "nomer" used before? It is not in the dictionary, but I was under the assumption that "nomer" was the opposite of "misnomer"? From the thesaurus references I have seen, ...
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2answers
109 views

She kicked me in the “sac” or “sack”? Reference is to the testicles

How do we spell "sac" / "sack" when referring to the testicles? Is it: She kicked me in the "sack" or "sac"?
0
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1answer
170 views

Is there an idiom about “dying monkey”?

is there an idiom sounding like "monkey dies" or "monkeys died"? What does it mean? I've been wondering since I heard Robert Plant's song "Monkey": Tonight you will be mine | Tonight the monkey'll ...
5
votes
2answers
162 views

What is the etymology of “word!” [duplicate]

Many people have begun to use the word "word" seemingly as an exclamation point or as a means to be emphatic. Where and why did this begin?
0
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1answer
99 views

Calculus vs calculation

It is becoming more popular on American talk shows to say "calculus" instead of "calculation." To my mind, calculus is either a branch of Mathematics or a stone like in the gall bladder. Any comments? ...
0
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2answers
269 views

what does the sentence “You wouldn't know a hospital corner if it bit you on the arse” mean?

The conversation goes something like this: Woman: I'll change the bed sheets. Man: No, I'll do it! Woman: I can make a bed! Man : You wouldn't know a hospital corner if it bit you ...
-5
votes
1answer
164 views

Tolerance in English for names with vulgar everyday meaning? [closed]

Why does English (and perhaps other languages) allow collisions between names and nouns with vulgar/offensive meanings? I'm thinking of course of Dick vs. dick. Possible explanations (in no ...
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3answers
756 views

What do you call someone who knows multiple programming languages?

Someone who knows multiple languages is called polyglot or multilingual (There can be nuances between two words also.). I'm not sure if we can apply these terms to someone who knows multiple ...
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3answers
439 views

What does the verb “nig” mean?

I have seen a photo on the Internet of a customer filling a large empty jug from a soda fountain at a fast food restaurant. It had caption that someone is "gonna nig". What does "nig" mean? Among ...
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2answers
1k views

Why do Aussies use “cactus” to mean “dead,” “useless,” or “broken”?

This bloody washing machine is cactus! Glossaries / dictionaries of Australian slang (like this one, and this one) list cactus as meaning "dead, useless, or broken." How did this usage come ...
2
votes
3answers
147 views

What’s the verb for discontinuing a call on a mobile phone?

What is the correct term for stopping a conversation on a mobile phone? In the old days we used to put the phone down when we were done talking. Do we now put the mobile down instead of putting the ...
3
votes
2answers
159 views

Does “selfie” refer to the picture's taker, the picture's poster, or both

I'm a middle-aged person who is not up on the latest trends and am not a social media user. But a few days ago on CNN, the anchors were going on about the latest celebrity "selfie" that had "gone ...
2
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1answer
85 views

Is “Christmas for Bogans” a metaphor?

If someone describes Australia day as "Christmas for Bogans", would that be a metaphor? What stereotype is implied in this statement? The term bogan (/ˈboʊɡən/) is Australian and New Zealander ...
1
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1answer
160 views

Would the slang version, yessir, of yes, sir, be deemed as derogatory, offensive, or simply disrespectful to someone your senior?

I use yessir as a slang form of yes, sir all the time. Is it even a word? Would the slang version, yessir, be deemed as derogatory, offensive, or simply disrespectful to someone your senior?
1
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1answer
269 views

Is there a slang word or phrase for a middle-aged woman who serially dates much younger men? [closed]

Such practice is observed more often in the artistic world and among socialites. Is there a slang word or frase for these ladies?
1
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1answer
462 views

What are the origins of using the abbreviation “v.” for “very”?

Looking to figure out where the abbreviation "v." originates from. I know "v." was heavily used in "Bridget Jones Diary," but that movie came out over a decade ago and was British. What are the ...
103
votes
7answers
10k views

What’s a “handegg”?

What’s a handegg? NOTE: This question is primarily related to the etymology of a compound noun which is not in The Dictionary. There is a hat this year called “Handegg”, given out for a posting that ...
4
votes
3answers
258 views

What do you call something that everyone says will happen but never does?

Is there a term for something that lots of people say is going to happen, but it never happens (at least in the immediate future)? For example, say everyone says "the tech bubble's going to burst" - ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Do lexicographers have a formal term for Insta-cant

With twitter and social media, it is possible for new cant to appear suddenly and spread widely in weeks or days, often via internet-memes, only to fall out of use just as quickly. Do lexicographers ...
8
votes
4answers
91k views

What does “fleek” mean and when was it first used?

The word fleek is all over Twitter. The @lovihatibot Twitterbot routinely finds it in searches for "I love the word [X]" and "I hate the word [X]", in fact it's the third most hated word over the ...
7
votes
7answers
543 views

Word or idiom to describe someone who always tries to inflate his skills/properties/experiences when talking with others? [duplicate]

Is there a word or idiom to describe someone who is always trying to create a good impression when talking about himself? Someone who is always trying to show that he is better than others even if he ...
5
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2answers
325 views

19th century American English “slang”?

As I was doing a bit of research online I stumbled on this Children's Corner page 311 from the American Farmers' Magazine 1858. And, frankly, there are a lot of words that look totally foreign to me. ...
2
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2answers
832 views

What does “Jungle Fever” mean?

I have just watched the "Jungle Fever 1991" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jungle_Fever) film which tell a story a white woman dates a black man. So, Does "Jungle Fever" mean a white woman dates a ...
1
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5answers
233 views

I'm looking for a slang word or idiom for someone who insists on intruding his presence on two others who would rather be alone

This person usually pretends not to see that he is unwelcome at the moment, but it may be that he just doesn't notice it. Depending on the circumstances, one of the two persons (typically lovers) ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

What would be an English equivalent for the Mexican Spanish word tocayo? [duplicate]

In Mexican Spanish (not sure if other Spanish speaking countries use the word too) we call "tocayo" to those people that share the same name as us (but not necessarily the same last name i.e., Juan ...
1
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2answers
348 views

Old timers referring to a “bad penny”

What is the source and meaning of "turning up like a bad penny?"